Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

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Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Hello everyone. My question might sound simple but I would like to know if there is any drawback from using direct light in terms of color or any other technical issue against soft boxes and umbrellas.

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2 (of course that I adjust the light so it have the same exposure for the sake of the comparison), but I want to know if there is anything that I'm missing, for example if editing later I will find any difference that I can't see at first glance.

I hope I made sense and thanks in advance for taking the time

Cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

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Bob
Bob Senior Member • Posts: 2,753
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.
1

Direct, softbox, and umbrellas produce different types of shadows.  It's not a matter of advantage or disadvantage, but just depends on what look the photographer is trying to achieve.

Alex Ethridge
Alex Ethridge Veteran Member • Posts: 5,208
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Same light source, same color.

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Dave_J_E Regular Member • Posts: 114
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.
1

Hi Alexis

The reflector material and the diffusing materials used in the softbox/umbrella could have an effect on the color of the light hitting the subject. A recent test I did with a white balance card showed a slight change in Color Temp (CCT actually) and a more significant change in Tint, comparing a Godox TT685 speedlight by itself, with an Octogonal Softbox, and through a translucent umbrella. Numbers (temp/tint) were 5743/2.9, 5744/4.3 and 5657/3.1.

This shouldn't be a problem if you shoot raw and use a test shot with a white balance card so you can adjust White balance in post.

Dave

kli
kli Veteran Member • Posts: 3,799
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.
4

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Hello everyone. My question might sound simple but I would like to know if there is any drawback from using direct light in terms of color or any other technical issue against soft boxes and umbrellas.

Just FYI, there's a Studio and Lighting Technique Forum that lives to answer questions like this :).

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting

Are you sure? Because shadows are often how you define a shape in 3D in a 2D image.

and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

There are four main factors by which our eyes judge light in an image:

  • intensity
  • direction
  • quality
  • color

Between using a modifier and not using a modifier (umbrella, softbox, etc.), the color and direction won't change. But the intensity might (some modifiers absorbs some of the light, as does bouncing).  But most importantly, the quality of the light changes. A bare flash gives hard light (sharply defined shadows), while a diffused flash behind a modifier is often going to give softer light (more diffused shadows).

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2

Well, it will depend on the size of your modifiers, and how closer/far you're using them from the subject.  It's the relative size of the light vs. the subject that determines how hard/soft the light gets.  If you're using an 8" softbox from 10' away from a large subject, it's going to look pretty much the same as hard bare flash.

Just me, but maybe consider trying bare direct flash vs bouncing  with any direct light flagged off with a BFT.

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NikonNature Veteran Member • Posts: 4,350
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Hello everyone. My question might sound simple but I would like to know if there is any drawback from using direct light in terms of color or any other technical issue against soft boxes and umbrellas.

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2 (of course that I adjust the light so it have the same exposure for the sake of the comparison), but I want to know if there is anything that I'm missing, for example if editing later I will find any difference that I can't see at first glance.

I hope I made sense and thanks in advance for taking the time

Cheers.

Lighting is a huge topic. To try to simplify it, direct light makes your flash/strobe a small light source resulting in harsh light with sharp well-defined shadows. A modifier - umbrella, softbox, etc. - will turn it into a large light source, especially if positioned close to the subject.

With either one, if the light is positioned in front of the subject you will wash out any shadows and won't see much form or shape. If you move the light 45 degrees to the side, you get more shadows and shape, which is usually desirable. Many will use a second light on the opposite side set to a lower power to temper the shadows from the first (key) light. Many strobes or monolights have a modeling lamp that allow you to move the light around and see where highlights and shadows will fall.

Check out the Strobist website for lots of good information.

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Bob wrote:

Direct, softbox, and umbrellas produce different types of shadows. It's not a matter of advantage or disadvantage, but just depends on what look the photographer is trying to achieve.

Thanks you for the answer. I don't use shadows because I need a flat photo of the product. I edit out the product and remove any shadows along with the white background and then edit in the plain color or background I require. I am going to test everything once again, but from what I tested, there was not difference when I adjusting the light so that direct light takes have the same exposure than the modifiers, that is why I wanted to know if maybe it altered the color beyond what I can notice at simple glance.

I'm just trying to learn by doing even if some of the question might some amateur. This forum continues to provide me with helpful answers that I wish one day I can give to someone else myself.

Cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Thank you for the reply.

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Alexis Cantury

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Dave_J_E wrote:

Hi Alexis

The reflector material and the diffusing materials used in the softbox/umbrella could have an effect on the color of the light hitting the subject. A recent test I did with a white balance card showed a slight change in Color Temp (CCT actually) and a more significant change in Tint, comparing a Godox TT685 speedlight by itself, with an Octogonal Softbox, and through a translucent umbrella. Numbers (temp/tint) were 5743/2.9, 5744/4.3 and 5657/3.1.

I have a 55" godox octobox and several 35" as well as a couple of 35 shoot throughs umbrellas both with dark background and without.

I have sk400ii godox strobes x4. I bought all my equipment in a short period of time because the prices were extremely convenient and a couple months laters due to import taxes they went almost double here. So that is why I have this set up.

I tested and did not notice a different other than maybe not getting the exact same intensity with than without modifiers once I compensated. But the results were quite similar.

This shouldn't be a problem if you shoot raw and use a test shot with a white balance card so you can adjust White balance in post.

Indeed I take pictures both in raw and jpg+ so your answer was quite helpful.

I just wanted to ask to be on the safe side because I have to make a gallery so it's not just for show in a catalog. And if I can edit the difference later in photoshop it helps me get on with it knowing I can fix it.

My point is not using a modifier only because I bought them. I will make good use of them in other works, but on this one I don't need shadows as I cut out them in photoshop along with the background to add a plain color or another pattern to the photos.

Thank you for the time and any other tips are welcomed.

Cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting

Are you sure? Because shadows are often how you define a shape in 3D in a 2D image.

Indeed. I cut out shadows and the white background in photoshop and add in a plain color or a pattern depending on the product. That is why I am just interested in how it affect how the product looks.

and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

There are four main factors by which our eyes judge light in an image:

  • intensity
  • direction
  • quality
  • color

Between using a modifier and not using a modifier (umbrella, softbox, etc.), the color and direction won't change. But the intensity might (some modifiers absorbs some of the light, as does bouncing). But most importantly, the quality of the light changes. A bare flash gives hard light (sharply defined shadows), while a diffused flash behind a modifier is often going to givesofter light (more diffused shadows).

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2

Well, it will depend on the size of your modifiers, and how closer/far you're using them from the subject. It's the relative size of the light vs. the subject that determines how hard/soft the light gets. If you're using an 8" softbox from 10' away from a large subject, it's going to look pretty much the same as hard bare flash.

I tested bare lights (not even with the beauty dish they come with) against 35" softbox and shootthrough umbrellas, both with and without the black sleeve on the back.

I have 4 godox sk400ii strobes and test with the 4 of them, because like I said, I want the product looking with plain light so I pointed each of them so every part is lighted up.

After compensating for the dim of the modifiers, to test if the colors look the same, I didn't find any difference, except maybe a bit more light or dark depending on if I nailed exactly the exposure.

I understand that some or most of the things I said might be amateur, but I well, I try to learn by doing and I this forum is quite good.

So what I mean is, if I cut out the shadows, increase the power on the strobes, does it make a difference when using 4 55" octoboxes quite close to the subject? I know it's not a typical setup but it is the answer that would help me the most.

I appreciate your time and the thoughtful explanation.

Hope I made sense and looking forward to the answer of what I asked here, if you have the time.

Cheers to you.

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Alexis Cantury

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

NikonNature wrote:

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Hello everyone. My question might sound simple but I would like to know if there is any drawback from using direct light in terms of color or any other technical issue against soft boxes and umbrellas.

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2 (of course that I adjust the light so it have the same exposure for the sake of the comparison), but I want to know if there is anything that I'm missing, for example if editing later I will find any difference that I can't see at first glance.

I hope I made sense and thanks in advance for taking the time

Cheers.

Lighting is a huge topic. To try to simplify it, direct light makes your flash/strobe a small light source resulting in harsh light with sharp well-defined shadows. A modifier - umbrella, softbox, etc. - will turn it into a large light source, especially if positioned close to the subject.

With either one, if the light is positioned in front of the subject you will wash out any shadows and won't see much form or shape. If you move the light 45 degrees to the side, you get more shadows and shape, which is usually desirable. Many will use a second light on the opposite side set to a lower power to temper the shadows from the first (key) light. Many strobes or monolights have a modeling lamp that allow you to move the light around and see where highlights and shadows will fall.

Check out the Strobist website for lots of good information.

Hello and thanks for the time.

I have 4 35" octoboxes that I use with 4 godox sk400ii strobes. I want the end product to look without shadows and I point the 4 lights directly to the product in a top down fashion. I cut out any shadows and the background and edit that in photoshop. This is the end result I'm looking for.

I tested bare light against the modifiers (compensating so the exposure is the same or similar) and did not see a difference, except maybe not getting exactly the same light output but editing a bit of exposure got to the same result.

I just don't want to use the modifiers only because I bought them. I know I will make good use of them on others projects.

If I understood what you said is that if I point the lights (be it bare or with modifiers directly to the product, and if I adjust the output of the strobes then there would be no change, except maybe a bit more or less bright depending how fine tuned the adjustment is)?

I know it is not a typical setup up, but it is what the job requires so I just want to know that by no using any modifiers, I am not missing on any color different or any other technical aspect that I might regret down the round, as once I start taking, I do dozens of products at once and I can not then redo everything.

I hope I made sense and I'm looking forward to your reply if you have the time.

Thanks and cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

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Bob
Bob Senior Member • Posts: 2,753
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.
2

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Bob wrote:

Direct, softbox, and umbrellas produce different types of shadows. It's not a matter of advantage or disadvantage, but just depends on what look the photographer is trying to achieve.

Thanks you for the answer. I don't use shadows because I need a flat photo of the product. I edit out the product and remove any shadows along with the white background and then edit in the plain color or background I require. I am going to test everything once again, but from what I tested, there was not difference when I adjusting the light so that direct light takes have the same exposure than the modifiers, that is why I wanted to know if maybe it altered the color beyond what I can notice at simple glance.

I'm just trying to learn by doing even if some of the question might some amateur. This forum continues to provide me with helpful answers that I wish one day I can give to someone else myself.

Cheers.

Experimentation is the BEST way to learn!!   I would suggest that you think about lighting differently.   It is ALL about shadows.   You say you don't use shadows - well that translates to having the type of lighting that is a large source coming from multiple angles.  So, by wanting a "flat" image, you're actually doing quite a bit of shadow management.

We also need to think about what exactly we mean by 'shadows'.

These kinds are shadows are distracting:

But you need some 'shadow' to bring out the three dimensional characteristics of your products.  Like this.... Notice the subtle EV difference in the front vs right side.  This was likely a three-light rig.  One to blast the white backdrop. One main light to the left, and another weaker light to the right (or a reflector).  There's also a slight shadow under the camera to indicate it's resting on a surface (not floating in the air).  So, if you want "zero shadow" be careful what you wish for

KCook
KCook Forum Pro • Posts: 19,296
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

kli wrote:

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Hello everyone. My question might sound simple but I would like to know if there is any drawback from using direct light in terms of color or any other technical issue against soft boxes and umbrellas.

Just FYI, there'sa Studio and Lighting Technique Forum that lives to answer questions like this :).

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting

Are you sure? Because shadows are often how you define a shape in 3D in a 2D image.

and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

There are four main factors by which our eyes judge light in an image:

  • intensity
  • direction
  • quality
  • color

Between using a modifier and not using a modifier (umbrella, softbox, etc.), the color and direction won't change. But the intensity might (some modifiers absorbs some of the light, as does bouncing). But most importantly, the quality of the light changes. A bare flash gives hard light (sharply defined shadows), while a diffused flash behind a modifier is often going to givesofter light (more diffused shadows).

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2

Well, it will depend on the size of your modifiers, and how closer/far you're using them from the subject. It's the relative size of the light vs. the subject that determines how hard/soft the light gets. If you're using an 8" softbox from 10' away from a large subject, it's going to look pretty much the same as hard bare flash.

Just me, but maybe consider trying bare direct flash vs bouncing with any direct light flagged off with a BFT.

+ 1 Good summary.

Plus, the quality of the light affects how highlights and texture appears.  Even after you have somehow eliminated the shadows.

Kelly

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Bob wrote:

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Bob wrote:

Direct, softbox, and umbrellas produce different types of shadows. It's not a matter of advantage or disadvantage, but just depends on what look the photographer is trying to achieve.

Thanks you for the answer. I don't use shadows because I need a flat photo of the product. I edit out the product and remove any shadows along with the white background and then edit in the plain color or background I require. I am going to test everything once again, but from what I tested, there was not difference when I adjusting the light so that direct light takes have the same exposure than the modifiers, that is why I wanted to know if maybe it altered the color beyond what I can notice at simple glance.

I'm just trying to learn by doing even if some of the question might some amateur. This forum continues to provide me with helpful answers that I wish one day I can give to someone else myself.

Cheers.

Experimentation is the BEST way to learn!! I would suggest that you think about lighting differently. It is ALL about shadows. You say you don't use shadows - well that translates to having the type of lighting that is a large source coming from multiple angles. So, by wanting a "flat" image, you're actually doing quite a bit of shadow management.

We also need to think about what exactly we mean by 'shadows'.

These kinds are shadows are distracting:

But you need some 'shadow' to bring out the three dimensional characteristics of your products. Like this.... Notice the subtle EV difference in the front vs right side. This was likely a three-light rig. One to blast the white backdrop. One main light to the left, and another weaker light to the right (or a reflector). There's also a slight shadow under the camera to indicate it's resting on a surface (not floating in the air). So, if you want "zero shadow" be careful what you wish for

Hello again. I completely get this type of shadow and it suits perfectly with the product in this case. But in my case since I'm taking flat top down photos of fabric products and I'm going for a flat sense of the piece, shadows actually go against the desired result.

I will try to post a "finished" demo at least when I edit one, because it will make a lot more sense than the explanation I made lol.

But yes, if I was not taking top down pictures, I would try the approach you described here. I am actually doing some work ad honorem for a couple of friends that allows me to practice while actually help them get a somewhat professional picture for their product (as in the camera is the professional part, but I'm really putting the effort as they were the best paid projects). Thank you and I hope I made myself a bit clearer. I thought I stated the top down orientation of the takes, but maybe I mentioned it in another answer I simply confused them.  Cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

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NikonNature Veteran Member • Posts: 4,350
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.
1

Alexis Cantury wrote:

NikonNature wrote:

Alexis Cantury wrote:

Hello everyone. My question might sound simple but I would like to know if there is any drawback from using direct light in terms of color or any other technical issue against soft boxes and umbrellas.

I don't need any shadow on the products I'm shooting and I take them in a flat surface with more than 1 strobe light so my question goes to how does the color and or any other parameter might get affected?

I don't see any difference comparing the shoots from the direct light vs the other 2 (of course that I adjust the light so it have the same exposure for the sake of the comparison), but I want to know if there is anything that I'm missing, for example if editing later I will find any difference that I can't see at first glance.

I hope I made sense and thanks in advance for taking the time

Cheers.

Lighting is a huge topic. To try to simplify it, direct light makes your flash/strobe a small light source resulting in harsh light with sharp well-defined shadows. A modifier - umbrella, softbox, etc. - will turn it into a large light source, especially if positioned close to the subject.

With either one, if the light is positioned in front of the subject you will wash out any shadows and won't see much form or shape. If you move the light 45 degrees to the side, you get more shadows and shape, which is usually desirable. Many will use a second light on the opposite side set to a lower power to temper the shadows from the first (key) light. Many strobes or monolights have a modeling lamp that allow you to move the light around and see where highlights and shadows will fall.

Check out the Strobist website for lots of good information.

Hello and thanks for the time.

I have 4 35" octoboxes that I use with 4 godox sk400ii strobes. I want the end product to look without shadows and I point the 4 lights directly to the product in a top down fashion. I cut out any shadows and the background and edit that in photoshop. This is the end result I'm looking for.

I tested bare light against the modifiers (compensating so the exposure is the same or similar) and did not see a difference, except maybe not getting exactly the same light output but editing a bit of exposure got to the same result.

I just don't want to use the modifiers only because I bought them. I know I will make good use of them on others projects.

If I understood what you said is that if I point the lights (be it bare or with modifiers directly to the product, and if I adjust the output of the strobes then there would be no change, except maybe a bit more or less bright depending how fine tuned the adjustment is)?

I know it is not a typical setup up, but it is what the job requires so I just want to know that by no using any modifiers, I am not missing on any color different or any other technical aspect that I might regret down the round, as once I start taking, I do dozens of products at once and I can not then redo everything.

I hope I made sense and I'm looking forward to your reply if you have the time.

Thanks and cheers.

So from this and one of your other comments it sounds like you are doing clothing 'flats'. It is also worth pointing out that shadows and highlights will be present on the clothing - slight wrinkles, buttons, seems, etc. I think the shadows you are worried about the shadows from the garment that show on the background. The best way to deal with that is to have at least two lights coming from opposite sides. You said you have 4, so you can play with the remaining two to see if you can get even better results.

A quick search turned up this video that might give you some ideas. Basically, shooting straight down on your garment which is laying flat on a white background. Lights with softboxes (bare flash can work too, but a softbox will create soft even light) coming from above, but two opposing angles.

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LordKOTL
LordKOTL Senior Member • Posts: 1,610
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

If you use bare flashes your light source will be very small with respect to your subject (unless you're shooting something smaller than the flashhead itself).  Your light will be hard.  Even if you use multiple flashes, in the areas where a single flash is the only illumination (the rest being shaded from the subject itself), the light will be hard within that zone.  Hard light isn't bad, per se, but if you don't want shadows, you want softer light.

The only other thing I can think of is there might be a chance that your flashes have an uneven light beam with "hot spots" (I haven't used the strobes you're using), which could make getting even light over the subject difficult.

Either way, I think its well within the realm of possibility for you to not have to use a large softbox or umbrella, you just might have to play with the lighting a lot to get what you're going for.  Good luck!

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

NikonNature wrote:

So from this and one of your other comments it sounds like you are doing clothing 'flats'. It is also worth pointing out that shadows and highlights will be present on the clothing - slight wrinkles, buttons, seems, etc. I think the shadows you are worried about the shadows from the garment that show on the background. The best way to deal with that is to have at least two lights coming from opposite sides. You said you have 4, so you can play with the remaining two to see if you can get even better results.

A quick search turned up this video that might give you some ideas. Basically, shooting straight down on your garment which is laying flat on a white background. Lights with softboxes (bare flash can work too, but a softbox will create soft even light) coming from above, but two opposing angles.

Hello there.

The setup shown in the video is somewhat similar to the one I build for myself while I was practicing and learning. I even started using about a couple of weeks ago the hair and dirt removal spinner that I use to remove my dog's hair from day to day clothing so it is great for flattening and polishing the look on the piece.

I also got a manfrotto tripod for top down view and I use 4 flashes instead of 2 but the setup is the same, in principle.

Indeed the shadows I'm worried about are the outer ones.

I bought the soft boxes and umbrellas to try, but after a few test, I found that the images tend to be darker all around even when compensating for the project I need.

When I used bare light, while the outer shadows were harsh, the image didn't get an orangy look to it. I also tested with a few portraits and in this case the soft boxes AMAZING, so it is indeed a case for the right tool for the right job.

I know I am doing my own setup and I'm no professional but I do have my particular vision even if it does not goes as per the norm.

Having said that, all my questions here were related as to how the color and/or other aspects would be affected if I used only bare light. To further remove shadows I use all four coming from each direction so the shadows on the surface of the piece of garment are not present.

I thank you for your time and I have already watched the video of course, and all this helps me to get to a better choice.

Cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

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OP Alexis Cantury Junior Member • Posts: 37
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

LordKOTL wrote:

If you use bare flashes your light source will be very small with respect to your subject (unless you're shooting something smaller than the flashhead itself). Your light will be hard. Even if you use multiple flashes, in the areas where a single flash is the only illumination (the rest being shaded from the subject itself), the light will be hard within that zone. Hard light isn't bad, per se, but if you don't want shadows, you want softer light.

The only other thing I can think of is there might be a chance that your flashes have an uneven light beam with "hot spots" (I haven't used the strobes you're using), which could make getting even light over the subject difficult.

Either way, I think its well within the realm of possibility for you to not have to use a large softbox or umbrella, you just might have to play with the lighting a lot to get what you're going for. Good luck!

Hello there.

Yes. I tested with and without modifiers and found no different (compensating output power of the strobes and once I removed the outer shadows and white background). I think that even with the modifiers, seeing as how I use the four of them close to the piece, and ironing it so it is absolutely flat, the shadows are gone without the need of the modifiers.

Having said that, the thread was to get some opinions and ideas from you guys as to what difference in color or any other aspect can be different even if at looking at the photos I don't see any difference. What I mean is that maybe I don't see it but when you edit a bit more some parameter is worse or better with or without modifiers.

I hope what I said made any sense. In any case I wanted to know if there was something I was missing before starting because I have a lot of items to photograph and wanted to start with a somewhat decent plan.

Thanks for your time and your help. This forum is great and the opinions I get are of great value to me.

Cheers.

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Alexis Cantury

 Alexis Cantury's gear list:Alexis Cantury's gear list
Sony a7R IV Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM
LordKOTL
LordKOTL Senior Member • Posts: 1,610
Re: Strobes direct light vs softbox or shoot through umbrella.

Alexis Cantury wrote:

LordKOTL wrote:

...

Hello there.

Yes. I tested with and without modifiers and found no different (compensating output power of the strobes and once I removed the outer shadows and white background). I think that even with the modifiers, seeing as how I use the four of them close to the piece, and ironing it so it is absolutely flat, the shadows are gone without the need of the modifiers.

Having said that, the thread was to get some opinions and ideas from you guys as to what difference in color or any other aspect can be different even if at looking at the photos I don't see any difference. What I mean is that maybe I don't see it but when you edit a bit more some parameter is worse or better with or without modifiers.

I hope what I said made any sense. In any case I wanted to know if there was something I was missing before starting because I have a lot of items to photograph and wanted to start with a somewhat decent plan.

Thanks for your time and your help. This forum is great and the opinions I get are of great value to me.

Cheers.

If you don't see any appreciable difference between bare strobes and softboxes, then I would run with the bare strobes if that's how you want to shoot--my $0.02 (no refunds).

Truth be told I'm not a stickler for perfect color since I tend to edit to what looks good to my eye, and I personally haven't noticed anything that would prevent getting a good WB color between using a bare strobe/speedlight (Godox AD200, Godox TT685, or a Nikon SB-500) with or without a softbox and with the flashes at different power levels.  The only difference I notice between softbox and not is the hardness of the light and/or hotspots--usually with the fresnel heads as opposed to bare bulb

You and others may be more exacting than I am, so take my opinion with a grain of salt if necessary.

Good luck and happy shooting.

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There's no shame in using auto or semiauto modes--no matter what the salesdroids at Best Buy tell you.

 LordKOTL's gear list:LordKOTL's gear list
Nikon D750 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR Nikon 85mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED +3 more
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