Purpose-centric advice buying a new camera

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
Digital Sky New Member • Posts: 1
Purpose-centric advice buying a new camera

Hello there. I'm going to be purchasing a new camera soon and was looking for some advice. Functionality, quality, size, and budget have landed me on the Canon EOS R. I'm not a professional. I have a non-photography related career so this is just an entry into photography for me. My work gives me the opportunity to travel and I have missed many countless potential shots that I now recognize after picking this up as a hobby. Soon to be side gig. I don't really want specialized use, more general capability. Landscape, wildlife, portrait, street etc. I am aware that the EOS R is not the best on the market for any of these and is older technology now, but in researching, I've found that it will suit my needs just fine. Being unfamiliar with optics, and the lens options, my question is this: I would need to carry one lens due to space limitations and I want to know what the best general use lens would be. Something that may be not the best at any one thing, but works ok for everything. If that makes sense. I'm aware as well that Canon has an EF adapter that would allow for the use of their EF lenses on the EOS R. Camera + lens + transport/storage gear i would prefer to stay under $3500 but could go as high as $4k.

Sorry for being so long winded about this and look forward to getting some knowledge dropped.

JustUs7 Senior Member • Posts: 1,778
Re: Purpose-centric advice buying a new camera

I would post this in the EOS R forum.  Might get some camera choice push back in here.

If you’re only willing to get one lens you might want a speed light with the R with no built in flash.  The RF 24-240mm USM covers a 10x’s zoom. JPEG’s are great and raw files opened in Canon’s DPP4 software are also great and easy to work on.

Being a 10x zoom, it benefits from Digital Lens Corrections, especially at the wide end. Users love it, but people looking at uncorrected raw files on test charts like to dump on it.  It’s not meant to be used without lens corrections. 
If big range isn’t a concern, then the 24-105 f/4 L lens would be good.

If you want a second lens for lowlight, indoors, use your speed light money on the RF 35mm f/1.8 IS STM Macro or the RF 50mm F/1.8 STM.

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ZilverHaylide Contributing Member • Posts: 992
Re: Purpose-centric advice buying a new camera

JustUs7 wrote:

I would post this in the EOS R forum. Might get some camera choice push back in here.

If you’re only willing to get one lens you might want a speed light with the R with no built in flash. The RF 24-240mm USM covers a 10x’s zoom. JPEG’s are great and raw files opened in Canon’s DPP4 software are also great and easy to work on.

Being a 10x zoom, it benefits from Digital Lens Corrections, especially at the wide end. Users love it, but people looking at uncorrected raw files on test charts like to dump on it. It’s not meant to be used without lens corrections.
If big range isn’t a concern, then the 24-105 f/4 L lens would be good.

If you want a second lens for lowlight, indoors, use your speed light money on the RF 35mm f/1.8 IS STM Macro or the RF 50mm F/1.8 STM.

Good advice, though personally I think the 10x zooms are pushing things a bit. But it very much depends on the person's end use. Social media? Newsprint? Fine. Giant prints? No. In between? Depends.

To the OP, expanding a bit on what @JustUs7 has said:

Probably the most "general purpose" lens one can buy for full frame is a zoom that starts around 24mm (half the mm of the "nifty fifty" that was the "standard" prime decades ago, so moderately wide, and wide enough for most general purpose uses), and goes to about 105mm (double the "reach" of the "standard" 50mm, and with a better perspective for uses such as portraits).

Canon has several 24-105, I'll have to defer to others to evaluate their performance, since I use Sony, not Canon mirrorless.

Even though you only want one lens (initially), before long you might find it advantageous to add one "prime" (a non-zoom) in your carry bag. As @JustUs7 has said, I'd consider the RF 35 or 50 (with a maximum aperture of f/1.8 - 2, they are smaller and less expensive than the "big guns" they sell to pros). But I'd also add the 85mm as deserving of consideration. 35-50-85 choice depends on usage preferences, which you'll come to know after using your zoom for awhile. That kind of lens (single focal length) will give you higher optical performance (usually sharper, but more importantly, lets you operate in lower lighting without having to boost camera ISO too much, which makes things grainy), and will be lighter and more compact than a zoom. Also lets you blur background more than a zoom because of smaller "depth of field". An 85mm deserves consideration because it is the traditional focal length on full frame for a portrait lens, and also produces a slightly-flatter perspective that can be good for other uses. (My mom used an 85mm as a travel lens, with good results (though most people would find it too long)).

Good shooting with whatever you choose.

ZilverHaylide Contributing Member • Posts: 992
An important consideration choosing equipment.

Important:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64386067

Read thru this thread which states that the R6 can't do multiple exposures with the 24-105mm kit lens. It's not entirely clear what types of multiple exposures they are referencing, and whether that includes what is called focus bracketing/stepping, which is an extremely useful technique, but some restrictions on some types of "multiple exposures" are apparently the case with several different lenses on one or more of the Canon R-family bodies.

I would thoroughly research this before purchase. (Including whether the R camera you are interested in allows such techniques -- not all cameras do. (In checking for a feature, always consult the latest instruction manual, as sometimes features not present when released get added later in a firmware update)). Frankly, nowadays, unless there was some OTHER unique feature that I needed and which that equipment and no other had, I simply would not buy any lens, or camera, that prevented me from using various "multiple exposure" techniques. They are that useful.

KCook
KCook Forum Pro • Posts: 19,308
Re: Purpose-centric advice buying a new camera

I would need to carry one lens due to space limitations and I want to know what the best general use lens would be.

If 1 lens is the permanent condition, it will need extreme zoom for wildlife.  And extreme zoom is more practical with small sensors, not full frame.

Kelly Cook

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