darktable 3.4.0 released

Started Dec 24, 2020 | Discussions
- Ken - Contributing Member • Posts: 637
Re: what is an autogenerated tarball

Thanks for explaining. I am not interested in compiling and only ended up at the GitHub site because the Darktable site did not have version 3.4.

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Enjoy the light,
Ken

Fazal Majid
Fazal Majid Senior Member • Posts: 2,304
Re: You got 3.5.0, not 3.4.0!
1

sluggy_warrior wrote:

I think only the even numbers (3.2, 3.4, ...) are stable public releases, the odd numbers (3.1, 3.3, 3.5, ...) are development cycles only.

That's a fairly common, if not universal convention in the Linux world.

The time-bomb crashes in Lightroom 6.14 in the face recognition module have lent a new urgency to my migration away.

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Fazal Majid (www.majid.info)

 Fazal Majid's gear list:Fazal Majid's gear list
Ricoh GR III Nikon Z7 Leica M11 Leica APO-Summicron-M 50mm f/2 ASPH Nikkor AF-S 300mm f/4E PF ED VR +33 more
OP Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,297
Canon RP: Canon CR3 files
5

CAcreeks wrote:

Why would you buy an RP? Image quality is no better than APS-C, and lenses are bigger and more expensive because it's full frame.

  • Not so expensive -- also easily available used.
  • Menus can be changed to English, unlike Sony cameras sold here in Japan.
  • Nice ergonomics.
  • I like the size, weight, and shape with no big EVF hump.
  • I have owned or still own a bunch of Canon cameras (10) and every single one of them were/are problem free with good ergonomics. Every single Sony camera I own (3) developed control wheel problems in a short time and have other things about them I don't like.
  • For use with old manual focus lenses so don't want to spend much for a FF super duper body. Don't care about AF.
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Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

OP Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,297
darktable 3.4.0 installed
1

Henry Richardson wrote:

darktable 3.4.0 released:

https://github.com/darktable-org/darktable/releases

Also there is a new, updated manual.

I downloaded it yesterday. Looks pretty good with lots of nice changes.

I still use Lightroom Classic, but since darktable is free I like to keep up to speed on it too. Although I like Lightroom and I have tons of edited photos in it don't like the future uncertainty associated with the yearly rental model.  One day I may decide to say adios to Adobe.

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Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,002
Re: darktable 3.4.0 installed

Henry Richardson wrote:

I downloaded it yesterday. Looks pretty good with lots of nice changes.

I still use Lightroom Classic, but since darktable is free I like to keep up to speed on it too. Although I like Lightroom and I have tons of edited photos in it don't like the future uncertainty associated with the yearly rental model. One day I may decide to say adios to Adobe.

Henry, have you tried importing Lightroom edits (xmp files) into darktable?

https://www.darktable.org/2013/02/importing-lightroom-development/

I know nothing about interoperability of sidecar files. DxO PhotoLab has dop(e) files.

I2K4
I2K4 Senior Member • Posts: 1,398
Re: darktable 3.4.0 released

Bruce Williams already has a four-part Youtube series on changes in 3.04.

His Dudeness
His Dudeness Contributing Member • Posts: 502
...moved...
 His Dudeness's gear list:His Dudeness's gear list
Nikon D300 Nikon D700 Fujifilm X-E2 Nikon D750 Fujifilm X-T3 +12 more
His Dudeness
His Dudeness Contributing Member • Posts: 502
workflow for newbies
2

This triggered me to propose a setting for beginners

jthomas39 wrote:

I clicked the "hamburger" 3-bar menu icon, and switched to "Beginner" for now. That's a much smaller subset of modules.

I say: don't use this setting. If you are a beinner, I defenitely encourage you to learn the scene-reffered workflow right from the beginning. I don't know why they added this "beginner" preset. For sure it will feel more familiar to users of other software, but it just doesn't make sense to me.

in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply pixel workflow defaults" is set to "scene-reffered"

Most important modules (IMHO):

  • (white balance... see below)
  • crop & rotate (also for manual keystone correction, if automatic correction does not work)
  • exposure (set middle gray)
  • tone equalizer (dodging and burning)
  • contrast equalizer (for sharpening)
  • color calibration (as a wonderful channel mixer, but may also perform white balance... read below)
  • color balance (global contrast and color grading)
  • filmic (tone mapping... e.g if you bumped up your exposure)
  • local contrast (first steps may "kill" the local contrast, get it back here. I recommend to use a parametric mask with focus on mid tones here)

Apart from that, these modules may be useful (not mentioning all the eye-candy stuff):

  • color zones
  • lens correction (can be applied automatically)
  • "denoise (profiled)" (general noise reduction)
  • perspective correction
  • retouch for removing sensor dirt, for cloning or for portrait retouch (don't use spot removal)

What about white balance?

Sorry, this became slightly more complicated, because you need to decide for one way:

1) legacy way: add the white balance module to the important modules above and use it as you are probably used to do.

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "legacy"
  • Use color calibration as channel mixer only
  • When using color calibration tool, make sure that the in the tab CAT the adaption is set to 'none (bypass)', otherwise it will do another WB correction. (should be automatically)

2) "modern" way: In this release the "color calibration" module has been released. It is a generalized channel mixer, which is also capable of performing advanced white balance. Nevertheless, the white balance module is required in the pipeline and must be in a specific mode (camera reference).

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "modern"
  • WB module should be set to "camera reference" automatically and it is no longer required to be displayed in your list of essential modules
  • WB is now configured in the "color calibration" module
  • There may exist certain camera models, for which the "camera reference" data may be slightly off, which may be confusing for beginners.

As a beginner: Decide for an option. Maybe the first one is easier for now. You can always play with the other options by setting the WB module in the correct mode.

 His Dudeness's gear list:His Dudeness's gear list
Nikon D300 Nikon D700 Fujifilm X-E2 Nikon D750 Fujifilm X-T3 +12 more
JeremieB Senior Member • Posts: 1,496
Re: workflow for newbies

His Dudeness wrote:

This triggered me to propose a setting for beginners

jthomas39 wrote:

I clicked the "hamburger" 3-bar menu icon, and switched to "Beginner" for now. That's a much smaller subset of modules.

I say: don't use this setting. If you are a beinner, I defenitely encourage you to learn the scene-reffered workflow right from the beginning. I don't know why they added this "beginner" preset. For sure it will feel more familiar to users of other software, but it just doesn't make sense to me.

in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply pixel workflow defaults" is set to "scene-reffered"

Most important modules (IMHO):

  • (white balance... see below)
  • crop & rotate (also for manual keystone correction, if automatic correction does not work)
  • exposure (set middle gray)
  • tone equalizer (dodging and burning)
  • contrast equalizer (for sharpening)
  • color calibration (as a wonderful channel mixer, but may also perform white balance... read below)
  • color balance (global contrast and color grading)
  • filmic (tone mapping... e.g if you bumped up your exposure)
  • local contrast (first steps may "kill" the local contrast, get it back here. I recommend to use a parametric mask with focus on mid tones here)

Apart from that, these modules may be useful (not mentioning all the eye-candy stuff):

  • color zones
  • lens correction (can be applied automatically)
  • "denoise (profiled)" (general noise reduction)
  • perspective correction
  • retouch for removing sensor dirt, for cloning or for portrait retouch (don't use spot removal)

If I may ask, what's wrong with spot removal in your opinion ?

I used it regularly and didn't notice any issue.

I didn't take the time to dig into retouch module (yet), at first glance it's very mysterious to me

What about white balance?

Sorry, this became slightly more complicated, because you need to decide for one way:

1) legacy way: add the white balance module to the important modules above and use it as you are probably used to do.

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "legacy"
  • Use color calibration as channel mixer only
  • When using color calibration tool, make sure that the in the tab CAT the adaption is set to 'none (bypass)', otherwise it will do another WB correction. (should be automatically)

2) "modern" way: In this release the "color calibration" module has been released. It is a generalized channel mixer, which is also capable of performing advanced white balance. Nevertheless, the white balance module is required in the pipeline and must be in a specific mode (camera reference).

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "modern"
  • WB module should be set to "camera reference" automatically and it is no longer required to be displayed in your list of essential modules
  • WB is now configured in the "color calibration" module
  • There may exist certain camera models, for which the "camera reference" data may be slightly off, which may be confusing for beginners.

As a beginner: Decide for an option. Maybe the first one is easier for now. You can always play with the other options by setting the WB module in the correct mode.

 JeremieB's gear list:JeremieB's gear list
Pentax K-70 Pentax K-3 Mark III Pentax smc FA 50mm F1.4 Pentax smc DA 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 AL Pentax smc D-FA 100mm F2.8 Macro WR +9 more
His Dudeness
His Dudeness Contributing Member • Posts: 502
Re: workflow for newbies
2

JeremieB wrote:

His Dudeness wrote:

This triggered me to propose a setting for beginners

jthomas39 wrote:

I clicked the "hamburger" 3-bar menu icon, and switched to "Beginner" for now. That's a much smaller subset of modules.

I say: don't use this setting. If you are a beinner, I defenitely encourage you to learn the scene-reffered workflow right from the beginning. I don't know why they added this "beginner" preset. For sure it will feel more familiar to users of other software, but it just doesn't make sense to me.

in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply pixel workflow defaults" is set to "scene-reffered"

Most important modules (IMHO):

  • (white balance... see below)
  • crop & rotate (also for manual keystone correction, if automatic correction does not work)
  • exposure (set middle gray)
  • tone equalizer (dodging and burning)
  • contrast equalizer (for sharpening)
  • color calibration (as a wonderful channel mixer, but may also perform white balance... read below)
  • color balance (global contrast and color grading)
  • filmic (tone mapping... e.g if you bumped up your exposure)
  • local contrast (first steps may "kill" the local contrast, get it back here. I recommend to use a parametric mask with focus on mid tones here)

Apart from that, these modules may be useful (not mentioning all the eye-candy stuff):

  • color zones
  • lens correction (can be applied automatically)
  • "denoise (profiled)" (general noise reduction)
  • perspective correction
  • retouch for removing sensor dirt, for cloning or for portrait retouch (don't use spot removal)

If I may ask, what's wrong with spot removal in your opinion ?

Nothing wrong, but the cloning algorithm is available in retouch as well and retouch additionally offers the healing mode, which often produces better results. I terms of removing spots (or other distracting things) retouch is as easy to use as spot removal. So not much point in using spot removal That's all.

I used it regularly and didn't notice any issue.

I didn't take the time to dig into retouch module (yet), at first glance it's very mysterious to me

What about white balance?

Sorry, this became slightly more complicated, because you need to decide for one way:

1) legacy way: add the white balance module to the important modules above and use it as you are probably used to do.

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "legacy"
  • Use color calibration as channel mixer only
  • When using color calibration tool, make sure that the in the tab CAT the adaption is set to 'none (bypass)', otherwise it will do another WB correction. (should be automatically)

2) "modern" way: In this release the "color calibration" module has been released. It is a generalized channel mixer, which is also capable of performing advanced white balance. Nevertheless, the white balance module is required in the pipeline and must be in a specific mode (camera reference).

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "modern"
  • WB module should be set to "camera reference" automatically and it is no longer required to be displayed in your list of essential modules
  • WB is now configured in the "color calibration" module
  • There may exist certain camera models, for which the "camera reference" data may be slightly off, which may be confusing for beginners.

As a beginner: Decide for an option. Maybe the first one is easier for now. You can always play with the other options by setting the WB module in the correct mode.

 His Dudeness's gear list:His Dudeness's gear list
Nikon D300 Nikon D700 Fujifilm X-E2 Nikon D750 Fujifilm X-T3 +12 more
JeremieB Senior Member • Posts: 1,496
Re: workflow for newbies

His Dudeness wrote:

Nothing wrong, but the cloning algorithm is available in retouch as well and retouch additionally offers the healing mode, which often produces better results. I terms of removing spots (or other distracting things) retouch is as easy to use as spot removal. So not much point in using spot removal That's all.

Thank you !

 JeremieB's gear list:JeremieB's gear list
Pentax K-70 Pentax K-3 Mark III Pentax smc FA 50mm F1.4 Pentax smc DA 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 AL Pentax smc D-FA 100mm F2.8 Macro WR +9 more
JasonTheBirder
JasonTheBirder Senior Member • Posts: 2,892
Re: workflow for newbies

JeremieB wrote:

His Dudeness wrote:

This triggered me to propose a setting for beginners

jthomas39 wrote:

I clicked the "hamburger" 3-bar menu icon, and switched to "Beginner" for now. That's a much smaller subset of modules.

I say: don't use this setting. If you are a beinner, I defenitely encourage you to learn the scene-reffered workflow right from the beginning. I don't know why they added this "beginner" preset. For sure it will feel more familiar to users of other software, but it just doesn't make sense to me.

in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply pixel workflow defaults" is set to "scene-reffered"

Most important modules (IMHO):

  • (white balance... see below)
  • crop & rotate (also for manual keystone correction, if automatic correction does not work)
  • exposure (set middle gray)
  • tone equalizer (dodging and burning)
  • contrast equalizer (for sharpening)
  • color calibration (as a wonderful channel mixer, but may also perform white balance... read below)
  • color balance (global contrast and color grading)
  • filmic (tone mapping... e.g if you bumped up your exposure)
  • local contrast (first steps may "kill" the local contrast, get it back here. I recommend to use a parametric mask with focus on mid tones here)

Apart from that, these modules may be useful (not mentioning all the eye-candy stuff):

  • color zones
  • lens correction (can be applied automatically)
  • "denoise (profiled)" (general noise reduction)
  • perspective correction
  • retouch for removing sensor dirt, for cloning or for portrait retouch (don't use spot removal)

If I may ask, what's wrong with spot removal in your opinion ?

I used it regularly and didn't notice any issue.

I didn't take the time to dig into retouch module (yet), at first glance it's very mysterious to me

Nothing is wrong with it. Spot removal works very well in many cases for dirt on a uniform background. If the background is a little more complex, retouch can sometimes work better because it has a smoother merging algorithm that blends the retouch in with the rest of the image.

OP Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,297
workflow: scene-referred
1

His Dudeness wrote:

This triggered me to propose a setting for beginners

jthomas39 wrote:

I clicked the "hamburger" 3-bar menu icon, and switched to "Beginner" for now. That's a much smaller subset of modules.

I say: don't use this setting. If you are a beinner, I defenitely encourage you to learn the scene-reffered workflow right from the beginning. I don't know why they added this "beginner" preset. For sure it will feel more familiar to users of other software, but it just doesn't make sense to me.

In addition one can also select workflow: scene-referred to get a set of modules that work well with it,

in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply pixel workflow defaults" is set to "scene-reffered"

Most important modules (IMHO):

  • (white balance... see below)
  • crop & rotate (also for manual keystone correction, if automatic correction does not work)
  • exposure (set middle gray)
  • tone equalizer (dodging and burning)
  • contrast equalizer (for sharpening)
  • color calibration (as a wonderful channel mixer, but may also perform white balance... read below)
  • color balance (global contrast and color grading)
  • filmic (tone mapping... e.g if you bumped up your exposure)
  • local contrast (first steps may "kill" the local contrast, get it back here. I recommend to use a parametric mask with focus on mid tones here)

Apart from that, these modules may be useful (not mentioning all the eye-candy stuff):

  • color zones
  • lens correction (can be applied automatically)
  • "denoise (profiled)" (general noise reduction)
  • perspective correction
  • retouch for removing sensor dirt, for cloning or for portrait retouch (don't use spot removal)

What about white balance?

Sorry, this became slightly more complicated, because you need to decide for one way:

1) legacy way: add the white balance module to the important modules above and use it as you are probably used to do.

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "legacy"
  • Use color calibration as channel mixer only
  • When using color calibration tool, make sure that the in the tab CAT the adaption is set to 'none (bypass)', otherwise it will do another WB correction. (should be automatically)

2) "modern" way: In this release the "color calibration" module has been released. It is a generalized channel mixer, which is also capable of performing advanced white balance. Nevertheless, the white balance module is required in the pipeline and must be in a specific mode (camera reference).

  • in preferences -> processing: make sure "auto-apply chromatic adaption defaults" is set to "modern"
  • WB module should be set to "camera reference" automatically and it is no longer required to be displayed in your list of essential modules
  • WB is now configured in the "color calibration" module
  • There may exist certain camera models, for which the "camera reference" data may be slightly off, which may be confusing for beginners.

As a beginner: Decide for an option. Maybe the first one is easier for now. You can always play with the other options by setting the WB module in the correct mode.

Good post.

-- hide signature --

Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

rambling robin
rambling robin Contributing Member • Posts: 992
Re: workflow: scene-referred

So far I have found the workflow:display-referred set provides all I need

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OP Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,297
Lightroom to darktable migration
4

I will write about my experience playing around with the darktable import function that imports Lightroom XMP files along with images and tries to translate some of the data for use by darktable. First, take a look at the following 2 links and then below you will see things I learned that are undocumented and I have never seen written about anywhere despite having searched, watching a couple of videos, etc.

Here is a 2013 article written by the developer about importing Lightroom XMP files along with image files into darktable:

https://www.darktable.org/2013/02/importing-lightroom-development/

You can also read the 3.4 manual info about importing Lightroom XMP files here:

https://www.darktable.org/usermanual/en/overview/sidecar-files/sidecar-import/

There are 2 different types of data to import:

  1. metadata (keywords (tags), star ratings, color labels, etc.)
  2. editing instructions

I experimented with it this year by importing a few of my files along with their Lightroom XMP sidecar files to see what darktable would do. I was using darktable 3.2.1 which was the release before this new 3.4.0.

I have 112k photos in my Lightroom catalog: 110k out-of-camera originals + 2k scanned film files. They all have keywords (tags), most have star ratings, many have color labels, many are in collections, etc. About 50k have been edited. I often go back to earlier edited photos and tweak them a bit. On rare occasions I undo all the edits and start over, but mostly just a few changes to an already edited photo. Some people suggest saving all the edited files to 16-bit TIFF files with the Lightroom editing baked in (sRGB or Adobe RGB or some other color space) which turns my 16.5mb Olympus PEN-F 20mp raw file into an 86mb compressed 16-bit TIFF file. And it turns my 3.85mb Olympus E-M10II 16mp JPEG file into an 83.5mb compressed 16-bit TIFF file. Now multiply that by all my files. And besides the explosion of storage space you are still stuck with baked in editing, baked in color space, etc. And you have thrown away all the advantages of non-destructive editing. So, for some people this is a reasonable solution, but it is not for me. On1, C1, ACDSee, and probably others also try to import the editing data from Lightroom, but none are even close to perfect. This is a very difficult thing to do and I no longer have any expectation that it is worthwhile to even do it to my photos.

My feeling these days is if I switch away from Lightroom then I most care about getting my keywords (tags), star ratings, color labels, collections, etc. since the editing translation to a different program is so far from perfect. With darktable you can get keywords (tags), star ratings, and color labels, but not collections. On1, C1, and ACDSee use the Lightroom catalog for the migration which has the collection data too whereas darktable uses the optional XMP files for each individual image file which is generated by Lightroom (you can get them by selecting your images and then hitting Ctrl-S to get them written). It is understandable why the free darktable uses the XMP files rather than the catalog. Adobe pretty regularly (every 2-3 years) changes the format of the catalog so if someone decodes it they have to keep decoding the new formats and updating the source code for the importer. The XMP files are text files and (presumably) are much easier to work with and they don't change.

Here are some important undocumented things I discovered:

  1. When you create the XMP files in Lightroom it only writes XMP files for raw files. If you have edited TIFFs and JPEGs also then there will be no XMP file for them so the editing info is lost and cannot be imported by darktable. Turns out this is very good thing for the reason I will mention below. The keywords (tags), star ratings, color labels, etc. are written in the XMP file for raw files and are written directly into the TIFF and JPEG files.
  2. When you import with darktable it picks up the keywords (tags), star ratings, color labels, etc. from the XMP file and also from the embedded data in TIFFs and JPEGs.
  3. You will see from the links above that darktable can only translate a small subset of the Lightroom editing instructions so right off the bat you can see this is not all that useful.
  4. The documentation says nothing about base curve (display-preferred), filmic (scene-preferred), or none. The darktable default is to use base curve (display-preferred), but it can be changed in preferences to either filmic (scene-preferred) or none. I spent a lot of time trying to figure this out with regards to importing Lightroom XMP files. After some research I found that the importer should not use either base curve or filmic when importing these, but it does. You have to set your preferences to none and then import. Even now I am not 100% sure about this, but from asking it seems like most people think that is what needs to be done and if you think about it then it probably makes sense.
  5. The darktable translation of even the subset of editing instructions is poor. I imported a few test photos with Lightroom XMP and the results were not good. Better off to not even do it since you have to undo it all and then manually turn on the base curve or filmic (depending on whether you want to use the old display-referred editing or the new scene-referred editing) before starting your editing. If you had any dust spot removal in Lightroom then darktable tries to duplicate it, but in my test it often did it in the wrong location so worse than not doing anything.
  6. Very unfortunately darktable gives you absolutely no control over how or even if it imports stuff from a Lightroom XMP file. Extremely bizarre because the darktable developers are constantly making everything even more complex with a huge number of often almost redundant modules, many knobs and levers to control every cryptic aspect of the module, etc. But in this case if there is an XMP file darktable automatically imports the data and does imperfect, incorrect edits on the subset of Lightroom instructions that it recognizes. You can't turn that off and you have zero control.
  7. One might think that you can use the darktable discard history command to get rid of the incorrect steps that the import function put in there. Wrong. This is not documented and almost certainly a bug, but discard history will not discard the steps that got added. It will only discard steps you did yourself. If it worked properly then you could select all your imported photos and discard the history to get rid of the mess the importer created. To get rid of the mess you will have to open each one up individually and manually remove the bad stuff from the history stack. Over and over for tens of thousands of photos.
  8. The thumbnails in the lighttable view are generated from the raw file after the editing steps have been applied. That means all the garbage images created by the importer will have garbage thumbnails too.

As it is now it is worse than useless, IMO. I most definitely want the metadata (keywords (tags), star ratings, color labels, etc.), but the editing stuff also gets automatically imported, translated incorrectly, and applied with no control over it. At the very least I would like to be able to tell it to import only the metadata, only the editing instructions, or both. Or a version of darktable that only imports the metadata since it seems to do that part correctly. It would probably only be about one line of code to disable the import of the editing stuff too or just use a conditional compilation instruction in the source code (#ifdef, etc. in C) when darktable is built.

-- hide signature --

Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

OP Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,297
darktable importing Lightroom XMP files
1

CAcreeks wrote:

Henry Richardson wrote:

I downloaded it yesterday. Looks pretty good with lots of nice changes.

I still use Lightroom Classic, but since darktable is free I like to keep up to speed on it too. Although I like Lightroom and I have tons of edited photos in it don't like the future uncertainty associated with the yearly rental model. One day I may decide to say adios to Adobe.

Henry, have you tried importing Lightroom edits (xmp files) into darktable?

https://www.darktable.org/2013/02/importing-lightroom-development/

I know nothing about interoperability of sidecar files. DxO PhotoLab has dop(e) files.

Yes, I saw that 2013 article a few years ago. I checked and the implementation of importing Lightroom XMP files has not been expanded or improved since it first became available.

You can also read the 3.4 manual info about importing Lightroom XMP files here:

https://www.darktable.org/usermanual/en/overview/sidecar-files/sidecar-import/

See my post below:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64696207

-- hide signature --

Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

His Dudeness
His Dudeness Contributing Member • Posts: 502
Re: Lightroom to darktable migration
1

Henry Richardson wrote:

[...] the editing stuff also gets automatically imported, translated incorrectly, and applied with no control over it. At the very least I would like to be able to tell it to import only the metadata, only the editing instructions, or both. Or a version of darktable that only imports the metadata since it seems to do that part correctly.

I think this import stuff exists just because someone wanted to migrate his LR data to darktable. It is not there because the darktable project tries to attract LR users and pull them away from LR. That is what other commercial tools do and why it makes sense for them to invest effort. I think in case of darktable it is up to the community of LR users, who are willing to switch, to fix and improve the import code. People, who currently use LR own data to test with and know LR better than most darktable devs.

It would probably only be about one line of code to disable the import of the editing stuff too or just use a conditional compilation instruction in the source code (#ifdef, etc. in C) when darktable is built.

Seems like you know at least a little bit about coding C. Did you try to look into the code?

I just took a quick look into 'src/develop/lightroom.c' and yes, it seems pretty easy to focus on meta data.

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Nikon D300 Nikon D700 Fujifilm X-E2 Nikon D750 Fujifilm X-T3 +12 more
sluggy_warrior Senior Member • Posts: 2,882
Re: Lightroom to darktable migration

His Dudeness wrote:

I think this import stuff exists just because someone wanted to migrate his LR data to darktable. It is not there because the darktable project tries to attract LR users and pull them away from LR. That is what other commercial tools do and why it makes sense for them to invest effort. I think in case of darktable it is up to the community of LR users, who are willing to switch, to fix and improve the import code. People, who currently use LR own data to test with and know LR better than most darktable devs.

Agreed. LR edits and structure change overtime, so is darktable's. Nobody is interested in wasting effort into a small translation use case with constantly moving targets at both ends. It's discouraging that your code is only valid for a few months.

Seems like you know at least a little bit about coding C. Did you try to look into the code?

I just took a quick look into 'src/develop/lightroom.c' and yes, it seems pretty easy to focus on meta data.

If I have to migrate from LR, given both use SQLite, I'd inspect the table structure in both LR and darktable, then query the needed data from LR, massage/transform them to match then insert into darktable' SQLIte DB. It's probably easiest that way, tinkering only with just the SQLite DBs.

Agree with Henry that it's not worth trying to import the edits, just the metadata. The edits changed even between darktable's versions, e.g., I now use Filmic instead of base curve, thus, I always reset/discard history when loading old RAWs.

CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,002
Re: workflow: scene-referred

rambling robin wrote:

So far I have found the workflow:display-referred set provides all I need

That might be advisable if your goal is to produce images for online display.

I keep wondering that requirements will be when displays with DCI-P3 gamut are available, as they are for Apple cellphones and new-ish Macs.

OP Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,297
Re: Lightroom to darktable migration

sluggy_warrior wrote:

Agree with Henry that it's not worth trying to import the edits, just the metadata. The edits changed even between darktable's versions, e.g., I now use Filmic instead of base curve, thus, I always reset/discard history when loading old RAWs.

All I want it the metadata, but darktable automatically imports and does garbage application of a subset of edits.  How did you discard history?  See my post.  That doesn't work.

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Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

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