My Experience with the RX100 in Disney (Example Striking Differences)

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agentBG425 New Member • Posts: 1
My Experience with the RX100 in Disney (Example Striking Differences)

Hello! New to the forum, but wanted to share a few pics.

Last Christmas, before the craziness of COVID, we visited the crowded Disney parks in Florida. I took the first picture with the RX100 vii. The camera was in auto mode, I was in the middle of a crowd, I didn't even try to take a good shot. I think most of us, even with a critical eye, would agree it is a good shot given the circumstances I just described, and especially for a camera that fits in my pocket!

But then how do I explain the second and third pictures? They were taken within an hour of the first picture, and there are many like them in the library. In the first pic where you can kind of see the plastic Santas, there are several shots in a row like this, even though I was standing still.

The third shot, again there are many like it, were in a slow moving boat ride (It's a Small World).

I am sure many of you are going to say this could have been avoided by properly setting up the camera, and I don't disagree for a second, but the reality is that there are times in life (like in Disney of all places) where that is not possible - and it would be great to have an understanding how the same camera can produce such different results on the same night. Was this user error? Just the reality of auto modes?

I'm new here so please go easy! But thoughts/input is greatly appreciated!

Sony RX100
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poipoipoi_2016 Contributing Member • Posts: 888
Re: My Experience with the RX100 in Disney (Example Striking Differences)

agentBG425 wrote:

Hello! New to the forum, but wanted to share a few pics.

Last Christmas, before the craziness of COVID, we visited the crowded Disney parks in Florida. I took the first picture with the RX100 vii. The camera was in auto mode, I was in the middle of a crowd, I didn't even try to take a good shot. I think most of us, even with a critical eye, would agree it is a good shot given the circumstances I just described, and especially for a camera that fits in my pocket!

But then how do I explain the second and third pictures? They were taken within an hour of the first picture, and there are many like them in the library. In the first pic where you can kind of see the plastic Santas, there are several shots in a row like this, even though I was standing still.

The third shot, again there are many like it, were in a slow moving boat ride (It's a Small World).

I am sure many of you are going to say this could have been avoided by properly setting up the camera, and I don't disagree for a second, but the reality is that there are times in life (like in Disney of all places) where that is not possible - and it would be great to have an understanding how the same camera can produce such different results on the same night. Was this user error? Just the reality of auto modes?

I'm new here so please go easy! But thoughts/input is greatly appreciated!

Well, the third shot is easy. You were on a moving boat, and in 1/8th of a second, you moved quite a lot.

General rule with IBIS on mid-MP sensors *with stable footing and prep* is 1.5/FL Shutter speed, and if the camera wasn't doing 1/FL (1/8 at 24mm?) on auto mode, that suggests there was so little light that it hit the limits of the auto ISO setting. And that's when you're, and I cannot stress this enough, *not on a moving boat*.

The second shot looks like an AF miss off a cheap camera in low light which happens to the best of us on the most expensive gear (at lower miss rates). Part of the reason to take 3-4 shot bursts and give the AF half a second to settle. Also at 1/13 second at ~40mm equivalent which is really pushing the IBIS.

The first shot meanwhile is 1/250 in high light, which both means that the camera doesn't have time to shake *and* the AF has plenty of light to find a subject. Even better, f/4 on a small sensor which is ~f/10 in Full Frame. Plenty of depth in your field even if it misses a bit.

/I shoot landscape and obviously people shooters will have different ideas, but I use Aperture mode during the day and manual mode with auto ISO at night when handheld, then back out to Aperture with fixed ISO 100 and automatic shutter speed on a tripod.

 poipoipoi_2016's gear list:poipoipoi_2016's gear list
Sony RX100 V Sony a7R III Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 Sony FE 24-105mm F4 Sony FE 24mm F1.4 GM +3 more
Craig Gillette Forum Pro • Posts: 11,029
Re: My Experience with the RX100 in Disney (Example Striking Differences)

agentBG425 wrote:

Hello! New to the forum, but wanted to share a few pics.

Last Christmas, before the craziness of COVID, we visited the crowded Disney parks in Florida. I took the first picture with the RX100 vii. The camera was in auto mode, I was in the middle of a crowd, I didn't even try to take a good shot. I think most of us, even with a critical eye, would agree it is a good shot given the circumstances I just described, and especially for a camera that fits in my pocket!

But then how do I explain the second and third pictures? They were taken within an hour of the first picture, and there are many like them in the library. In the first pic where you can kind of see the plastic Santas, there are several shots in a row like this, even though I was standing still.

The third shot, again there are many like it, were in a slow moving boat ride (It's a Small World).

I am sure many of you are going to say this could have been avoided by properly setting up the camera, and I don't disagree for a second, but the reality is that there are times in life (like in Disney of all places) where that is not possible - and it would be great to have an understanding how the same camera can produce such different results on the same night. Was this user error? Just the reality of auto modes?

I'm new here so please go easy! But thoughts/input is greatly appreciated!

As above, the first shot has plenty of light so it was able to achieve focus and doesn't require so long a shutter time that either camera or subject motion is shown.

The second shot didn't acquire focus.  That could be a couple of things.  A quick glance on line didn't show if the RX100s had a release priority setting.  Some cameras can be set so they will not release the shutter if not in focus, the alternative being allow the camera to release the shutter when the shutter button is pressed, regardless of focus.   Or, maybe it just allows shutter release when it's fully presses.  In which case, being sure the focus was acquired would be needed.  Now it is possible that sometimes a focus will acquire and then depending on motion, light levels, etc. lose focus again.  It might be that you'd need to be more deliberate, half pressing, pausing to be sure then firing.

The third, again, a fairly dark environment.  Because you will be getting a slow exposure, you might try panning, holding on the main subject and moving the camera.  If the boat is moving to the left, the pan will be to the right.

Digital Nigel Forum Pro • Posts: 13,522
Re: My Experience with the RX100 in Disney (Example Striking Differences)
1

You've had some good answers here, but you might want to try the Cyber-shot forum for queries about this camera.

The RX100M7 isn't a good camera for use in low light conditions. The price for the relatively long zoom in a very small camera is that the lens is quite slow. For shots like these, the cheaper RX100M5A would produce better results with its one stop faster lens, but to get good results you need a larger sensor camera that can use higher ISOs.

ISO6400 is about as high as you can go with a 1" sensor, whereas with APS-C, ISO12800 can be used if necessary, and I go up to ISO20000 with my A7RM3.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +19 more
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