Star photos

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
Lori2
Lori2 Forum Member • Posts: 59
Star photos

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings. 
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200.  I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try?? 
lori

Canon EOS M50 (EOS Kiss M)
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dan the man p Regular Member • Posts: 294
Re: Star photos

Lori2 wrote:

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings.
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200. I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try??
lori

Which star are you talking about?

For astrophotography in general, if you don't have a tracking mount, you are going to be limited by the exposure time to avoid streaks, so you want something with a large aperture, and don't be afraid to pump up the ISO a bit. I've gotten good results with my EF-50 f/1.8, up to about a 4-second exposure without too obvious streaking. Obviously, the more magnification you have, the more noticeable the Earth's rotation will be and the shorter the exposure will have to be. However, if you have one of those stacking programs, you can get away with a lot shorter exposures.

I haven't done anything too impressive (don't even have a proper tripod, lol), but here are a couple cropped astro photos I've taken with the EF-50.

Andromeda Galaxy

Orion Nebula

Jupiter with a moon or two visible

 dan the man p's gear list:dan the man p's gear list
Sony DSC-RX0 Canon EOS M50 Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM
Icagel Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: Star photos

For better photos you will need a tracker. In my picture I have used 50mm 1.8 STM, I made 327 frames and stacked them. Just for interest. This is my first try for deep sky. Later I saw only clouds. Orion nebula.

 Icagel's gear list:Icagel's gear list
Canon EOS M6 II Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 50mm F1.8 STM +2 more
Lori2
OP Lori2 Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: Star photos

I had great fun last summer photographing the Neowise Comet and attempting the Milky Way.  
I do have a star tracker on my wishlist for someday.

Lori2
OP Lori2 Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: Star photos

dan the man p wrote:

Lori2 wrote:

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings.
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200. I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try??
lori

Which star are you talking about?

tonight, shortly after sunset, for a short period of time there is a conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn that they are calling the Christmas Star

Andy01 Senior Member • Posts: 4,287
Re: Star photos

Lori2 wrote:

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings.
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200. I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try??
lori

Without a tracker on a 24Mp APS-C you would be applying Rule of 200, so using a 135mm lens, you should be limiting to 200 / 135 = 1.5 second shutter speeds. I would be quite surprised if you could capture anything on a M50 at say - f2, 1.5 seconds, ISO 1600. Even though the lens has a very nice large aperture (135 / 2 = 67mm), the exposure time is just too short - unless you accept some noise and crank up the ISO to something like 6400 or higher.

With the Tamron the same applies and more so because it is a lot slower and potentially longer.

Your best bet might be the EF-M (presumably ?) 32mm f1.4 because you could use f1.4 or f1.8, around 6-8 seconds, and ISO 1600. Obviously the focal length is too short to really a stars other than a nightscape or a portion of the Milky Way.

If you are looking to capture stars with a longer lens like 135mm (and especially so on APS-C) you will have to get a decent tracker.

Colin

 Andy01's gear list:Andy01's gear list
Canon EOS M5 Canon 6D Mark II Canon EF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF 35mm F2 IS USM +5 more
Keith Van Hulle
Keith Van Hulle Regular Member • Posts: 130
Re: Star photos

Lori2 wrote:

dan the man p wrote:

Lori2 wrote:

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings.
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200. I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try??
lori

Which star are you talking about?

tonight, shortly after sunset, for a short period of time there is a conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn that they are calling the Christmas Star

HA! Only for those luck enough to NOT be living in the pacific northwest . . .

 Keith Van Hulle's gear list:Keith Van Hulle's gear list
Canon EOS 30D Canon EOS 70D Canon 6D Mark II
dan the man p Regular Member • Posts: 294
Re: Star photos

Andy01 wrote:

Lori2 wrote:

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings.
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200. I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try??
lori

Without a tracker on a 24Mp APS-C you would be applying Rule of 200, so using a 135mm lens, you should be limiting to 200 / 135 = 1.5 second shutter speeds. I would be quite surprised if you could capture anything on a M50 at say - f2, 1.5 seconds, ISO 1600. Even though the lens has a very nice large aperture (135 / 2 = 67mm), the exposure time is just too short - unless you accept some noise and crank up the ISO to something like 6400 or higher.

With the Tamron the same applies and more so because it is a lot slower and potentially longer.

Your best bet might be the EF-M (presumably ?) 32mm f1.4 because you could use f1.4 or f1.8, around 6-8 seconds, and ISO 1600. Obviously the focal length is too short to really a stars other than a nightscape or a portion of the Milky Way.

If you are looking to capture stars with a longer lens like 135mm (and especially so on APS-C) you will have to get a decent tracker.

Colin

The planets are pretty bright, so they don't really need a long exposure. Of course, they're just basically going to look like orbs without pretty strong magnification. Here's what I was able to capture with the EF-50 1.8. If you look at it 100%, you can make out 2-3 of Jupiter's moons.

 dan the man p's gear list:dan the man p's gear list
Sony DSC-RX0 Canon EOS M50 Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM
Andy01 Senior Member • Posts: 4,287
Re: Star photos

dan the man p wrote:

Andy01 wrote:

Lori2 wrote:

Ok, so I don’t have a ton of time to research, and this isn’t like Neowise where I had several chances for trying different lenses and settings.
Tips for photographing the star with the M50?

I was thinking of trying two lenses, my 135 f2, and efm 55-200. I’ve also got a Tamron 70-300 VC (5.6)
and efm 22, 32, ef50 1.8, and a bunch of others but my 135 is my fastest longer lens.

Settings to try??
lori

Without a tracker on a 24Mp APS-C you would be applying Rule of 200, so using a 135mm lens, you should be limiting to 200 / 135 = 1.5 second shutter speeds. I would be quite surprised if you could capture anything on a M50 at say - f2, 1.5 seconds, ISO 1600. Even though the lens has a very nice large aperture (135 / 2 = 67mm), the exposure time is just too short - unless you accept some noise and crank up the ISO to something like 6400 or higher.

With the Tamron the same applies and more so because it is a lot slower and potentially longer.

Your best bet might be the EF-M (presumably ?) 32mm f1.4 because you could use f1.4 or f1.8, around 6-8 seconds, and ISO 1600. Obviously the focal length is too short to really a stars other than a nightscape or a portion of the Milky Way.

If you are looking to capture stars with a longer lens like 135mm (and especially so on APS-C) you will have to get a decent tracker.

Colin

The planets are pretty bright, so they don't really need a long exposure.

Agreed. The OP asked about stars, not planets.

Of course, they're just basically going to look like orbs without pretty strong magnification.

Yes, I am going to try with my M5 + 100-400L ii at 400mm if the cloud clears, but even 400mm is too short based on some research with Stellarium. I really need at least 800mm (on APS-C) and a very clear sky - I don't have 800mm, and a clear sky in hot humid summer weather (Australia) with the planets low on the horizon is pretty unlikely.

Here's what I was able to capture with the EF-50 1.8. If you look at it 100%, you can make out 2-3 of Jupiter's moons.

The OP could certainly capture these planets with a 135mm, but they would not be large enough to look like anything more that decently bright stars.

Colin

 Andy01's gear list:Andy01's gear list
Canon EOS M5 Canon 6D Mark II Canon EF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF 35mm F2 IS USM +5 more
dan the man p Regular Member • Posts: 294
Re: Star photos
1

Andy01 wrote:

dan the man p wrote:

The planets are pretty bright, so they don't really need a long exposure.

Agreed. The OP asked about stars, not planets.

But later clarified that she meant Jupiter+Saturn.

Of course, they're just basically going to look like orbs without pretty strong magnification.

Yes, I am going to try with my M5 + 100-400L ii at 400mm if the cloud clears, but even 400mm is too short based on some research with Stellarium. I really need at least 800mm (on APS-C) and a very clear sky - I don't have 800mm, and a clear sky in hot humid summer weather (Australia) with the planets low on the horizon is pretty unlikely.

Hopefully you get a chance to do it. I'd like to see how it looks at 400mm.

 dan the man p's gear list:dan the man p's gear list
Sony DSC-RX0 Canon EOS M50 Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM
Lori2
OP Lori2 Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: Star photos
1

This is what I got.  Went with the 135 f2.

Andy01 Senior Member • Posts: 4,287
Re: Star photos

Lori2 wrote:

This is what I got. Went with the 135 f2.

Did you try any other exposure combinations ? Perhaps a lower ISO like 800 and a slower shutter speed (like 1/2 to 1 second) ? I suspect that the exposure could have been a bit darker as they look a bit over-exposed.

From what the guys in the astro forum are reporting, it seems to make sense to take several shots at different exposures (to compensate for the varying brightness between the planets) and combine them in post. A few of the shots (with longer focal lengths) have got one planet exposed well and the other is overexposed if they did it in a single shot.

Colin

 Andy01's gear list:Andy01's gear list
Canon EOS M5 Canon 6D Mark II Canon EF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF 35mm F2 IS USM +5 more
Lori2
OP Lori2 Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: Star photos

Andy01 wrote:

Lori2 wrote:

This is what I got. Went with the 135 f2.

Did you try any other exposure combinations ? Perhaps a lower ISO like 800 and a slower shutter speed (like 1/2 to 1 second) ? I suspect that the exposure could have been a bit darker as they look a bit over-exposed.

From what the guys in the astro forum are reporting, it seems to make sense to take several shots at different exposures (to compensate for the varying brightness between the planets) and combine them in post. A few of the shots (with longer focal lengths) have got one planet exposed well and the other is overexposed if they did it in a single shot.

Colin

I shot wide open at f2, and did a little adjusting shutter speed, but basically because I don't do well out in the cold for long, I didn't do a ton.  I was more focused on focusing! LOL

Larry Rexley Regular Member • Posts: 210
Re: Star photos
1

I have a Canon M6 Mark II and also do astrophotography with just a tripod and regular telephoto lenses. In my case I use vintage Minolta lenses with a Fotasy Minolta to EOS M adapter.

A 135mm f2 lens is fast and is a great choice for the brightest deep sky objects like the Orion nebula (M42), the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and the Pleiades star cluster. I have gotten all three of those with a 135mm f2.8 lens. You can do some tests with your lens to see if if it is really sharp at f2.0, if not you may wish to stop down a half or full stop to get better deep sky photos.

I found with my setup that I can only use 0.8 second exposure for the Orion nebula before I get star trails, but my camera higher resolution (32 MP) you can probably get away with longer exposures, perhaps 1.2 seconds or so. With objects closer to the celestial pole you can go longer, maybe up to 2 seconds for Andromeda. Just take some test images at different shutter speeds and then look at them zoomed in, choose the longest speed that still gives pinpoint stars at the center of the frame (stars near the frame edges may appear elongated at wide apertures).

For the Moon and planets, a 400mm or longer lens is a good start. I've found 500 and higher to work very well. Note that EF-mount lenses can be used with a good EF teleconverter... I have a Kenko/Tamron MC7 I got for $40 from eBay that does not reduce the sharpness of the lenses it's used with, as long as they are good lenses. I use it with my Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS STM zoom lens, I had to cut off the back of that EF-S lens mount to convert it to an EF-mount lens, to work with the teleconverter (do this at your own risk!) but the results are excellent for the Moon and planets. In fact I use it with TWO stacked MC7 teleconverters on the Moon to get a 1000mm f22 lens, with great results.

Attached are some of my photos with my setup. All are using many exposures (100 to 200) stacked using the free software DeepSkyStacker. All were taken with ISO 2500 - 5000 at exposures of 0.8 to 2 seconds. All with 135mm f2.8 lens on a tripod. M42 Orion nebula, M31 Andromeda galaxy, and the Pleiades.

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