How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

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skanter
skanter Forum Pro • Posts: 23,668
Changing drive letters

Do I need to change Drive letters to match previous system, or will LR figure it out for me  for me when opening a catalogue on a new system?

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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 5,802
Re: Great info so far

Austinian wrote:

Very good summary. I would also suggest that when image backups are made with Macrium, the "Auto Verify" choice in "Advanced Options" is used, just to be sure that the backup is OK.

That does increase the backup time substantially, but I think it's worth it in case something did go wrong, though I personally have never seen that.

Absolutely!  The verify after backup option is  a must do.  It doesn't make sense to do an image backup without the verify after backup option turned on.  Thanks for letting the OP know about that since the verify option is defaulted to off in Macrium Reflect.

Sky

PHXAZCRAIG
PHXAZCRAIG Forum Pro • Posts: 17,388
Re: Great info so far
1

Austinian wrote:

That does increase the backup time substantially, but I think it's worth it in case something did go wrong, though I personally have never seen that.

In my long experience working on systems with backup drives, I've seen backups fail with catastrophic consequences.   This happened the first time on a system that held CNC drilling information for hundreds of aviation printed wiring board designs.  Backups were done faithfully every day, but nobody ever did a test restore to see if they were working.

One day I had to reformat the hard drive on the system, and the engineer of the system assured me to do it, backups had just been done.   And the backups failed, meaning all that data was gone

Something similar happened at a Motorola division where a new engineer had inherited a system 3 weeks earlier.  Reformatted the drive, and restored all the data in a suspiciously-quick 15 minutes.  Yep, all those backups were sequential, and only covered about 5% of the data.

TEST a backup!!

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Austinian
MOD Austinian Forum Pro • Posts: 10,860
Re: Great info so far

PHXAZCRAIG wrote:

Austinian wrote:

That does increase the backup time substantially, but I think it's worth it in case something did go wrong, though I personally have never seen that.

That comment specifically applies to Macrium Reflect Free image backups. I have indeed seen backups fail.

In my long experience working on systems with backup drives, I've seen backups fail with catastrophic consequences. This happened the first time on a system that held CNC drilling information for hundreds of aviation printed wiring board designs. Backups were done faithfully every day, but nobody ever did a test restore to see if they were working.

One day I had to reformat the hard drive on the system, and the engineer of the system assured me to do it, backups had just been done. And the backups failed, meaning all that data was gone

Something similar happened at a Motorola division where a new engineer had inherited a system 3 weeks earlier. Reformatted the drive, and restored all the data in a suspiciously-quick 15 minutes. Yep, all those backups were sequential, and only covered about 5% of the data.

TEST a backup!!

Sometime in the late-middle 1980s my boss of the time bought me a SOTA Dell 386 with a gargantuan 150MB ESDI drive. with Autocad, Desqview 386, BRIEF, Xtree Gold, and several other software goodies.

Glorious! I greatly enjoyed my fine new toy, and carefully backed up everything to the 1.2 MB 5.25-inch floppies using PC Tools.

The ESDI drive crashed spectacularly one day, but no problem, have a recent backup! Except, floppies...one of which was apparently defective and the restore failed.

Fortunately, having a long experience with previous failed disks, I had nearly all the individual data files saved separately on floppies; only about a day's work was lost. A small price to pay for such a valuable lesson!

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CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 16,282
Re: Great info so far

Austinian wrote:

TEST a backup!!

Sometime in the late-middle 1980s my boss of the time bought me a SOTA Dell 386 with a gargantuan 150MB ESDI drive. with Autocad, Desqview 386, BRIEF, Xtree Gold, and several other software goodies.

Glorious! I greatly enjoyed my fine new toy, and carefully backed up everything to the 1.2 MB 5.25-inch floppies using PC Tools.

The ESDI drive crashed spectacularly one day, but no problem, have a recent backup! Except, floppies...one of which was apparently defective and the restore failed.

SOTA = state of the art? school of the arts?

Yes, a joke in the industry is that backups are "write only" usually.

Most tape drives were almost as unreliable as floppy disks, although that didn't stop vendors from trying. A new format appeared annually it seems. At some point the high-priced tape drives could be relied upon for a monthly cycle of full and incremental backups.

We have it pretty good nowadays because HDD is extremely reliable in comparison.

Tom_N Forum Pro • Posts: 18,679
Re: Great info so far

CAcreeks wrote:

Yes, a joke in the industry is that backups are "write only" usually.

There were a couple of old jokes on how to lose data on a soft-sided (5.25" or 8") floppy.

One involved a secretary using a magnet to pin a floppy disk against the side of a metal filing cabinet.  The other involved a secretary running a floppy disk through an Selectric typewriter, as though it were a piece of paper, in order to type the label …

Austinian
MOD Austinian Forum Pro • Posts: 10,860
Re: Great info so far

CAcreeks wrote:

Austinian wrote:

TEST a backup!!

Sometime in the late-middle 1980s my boss of the time bought me a SOTA Dell 386 with a gargantuan 150MB ESDI drive. with Autocad, Desqview 386, BRIEF, Xtree Gold, and several other software goodies.

Glorious! I greatly enjoyed my fine new toy, and carefully backed up everything to the 1.2 MB 5.25-inch floppies using PC Tools.

The ESDI drive crashed spectacularly one day, but no problem, have a recent backup! Except, floppies...one of which was apparently defective and the restore failed.

SOTA = state of the art? school of the arts?

Whichever makes more sense for you is fine.

Yes, a joke in the industry is that backups are "write only" usually.

Most tape drives were almost as unreliable as floppy disks, although that didn't stop vendors from trying. A new format appeared annually it seems. At some point the high-priced tape drives could be relied upon for a monthly cycle of full and incremental backups.

I never had a computer tape drive. Except the original cassette storage on the Atari 400.

We have it pretty good nowadays because HDD is extremely reliable in comparison.

Indeed we do. Compared to the early days, using PCs is incredibly easy.

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Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,275
Re: Great info so far
2

CAcreeks wrote:

Most tape drives were almost as unreliable as floppy disks, although that didn't stop vendors from trying.

One of the best programs I had the pleasure to use was the VMS Backup utility for Digital Equipment's VAX computers.  It had the ability to write redundancy blocks to the backup saveset to recover from unreadable sections of tape.  I remember watching the tape drive during an important restore one day - the reels were whirling around at high speed, but then they stopped suddenly and started jerking back-and-forth, back-and-forth, back-and forth.  The drive was trying and failing to read a block.   I remember exhorting the drive "please, please PLEASE!".   Then suddenly the reels started spinning again and the backup completed successfully with nary a whimper.  My hat was off to that program.

Another favourite was the "Westinghouse Disk Utility System", a third-party backup program we used with our IBM 360/40.  The manual included these "Ten Commandments of Reliability":

  1. Thou shalt use the Westinghouse programs for they checketh high and they checketh low and even verify whereof they write upon the disk.
  2. Thou shalt use standard tape labels.
  3. Thou shalt use unique volume serial numbers on all tapes and disks.
  4. Thou shalt pitcheth any tape with too many write transgressions for they may not be redeemed.
  5. Thou shalt cleanse all tape drives first thing every shift.
  6. Thou shalt enjoin thy operators to treat all tape reels and disk volumes with reverence, so as to minimize repeated mechanical deformations beyond the elastic limits of those objects.
  7. Thou shalt believe in all Function 00-06 error messages, and gainsay both 'Ditto' and your IBM CE, for they speak with forked tongue.
  8. Thou shalt use DASD file protect in thy DOS supervisor, verily though it cheweth up core with your systems programmer covets.
  9. Thou shalt post and check record counts on all formatted files at every backup and restore.
  10. Thou shalt periodically backup everything in sight on every disk volume, and cunningly stash said backups in a sanctuary away from the iniquities of the computer room.
OP 21tones Regular Member • Posts: 303
Re: Great info so far
1

Thank you all for your really helpful comments about cloning/backing up.

Even I understand it!

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