How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 5,805
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

21tones wrote:

Thankyou for your further comments.

As a nontechy person I will have to do some reading up here!

It would seem that my email is IMAP as deleting email on my phone also deleted it from my computer after refreshing it.

Already using IMAP .... excellent. You don't have to worry about cluttering your hard drive with a bunch of emails.

Regarding using File Explorer's Quick Access (QA), it's so easy.
When you have the folder you want showing in File Explorer, just right click it and then click Pin to quick access. A link to that folder will appear in the QA list.

Using my MS Office example that I listed in a previous post, here's the difference:

Without QA:
Open File Explorer > Click "This PC" in left pane > click D: drive in right pane > click Microsoft Office > click Winword.

Using QA:
Open File Explorer > click Winword.

Without quick access, it takes 4 clicks to open the Winword folder on the D drive (which includes scanning the list of folders each time to find the one to click).

With quick access, it takes one click (with no need to scan lists of folders).

When you want to save a file from any program, the save dialog will show File Explorer. Just click the commonly used folder that you previously pinned in QA and you're there.

When you first use quick access, the default is to show folders in the C drive. Since you won't be saving data to the C drive anymore, just delete those C drive folders to clear the clutter. Just right click the unwanted folder and click "Unpin from quick access". No harm since you can always re-pin the deleted folders if desired.

Finally, for a very often used folder (Winword for me), pin a link to it on the Windows task bar. Then when you want to browse the Winword folder for a file, you can just open it instantly without even opening File Explorer. (When you want to save a file, the save dialog will show the QA to the Winword or other commonly used folder).

All of these tips save having to navigate to the D: drive and beyond.

Sky

WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 10,565
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

skyglider wrote:

21tones wrote:

Thankyou for your further comments.

As a nontechy person I will have to do some reading up here!

It would seem that my email is IMAP as deleting email on my phone also deleted it from my computer after refreshing it.

Already using IMAP .... excellent. You don't have to worry about cluttering your hard drive with a bunch of emails.

Regarding using File Explorer's Quick Access (QA), it's so easy.
When you have the folder you want showing in File Explorer, just right click it and then click Pin to quick access. A link to that folder will appear in the QA list.

Using my MS Office example that I listed in a previous post, here's the difference:

Without QA:
Open File Explorer > Click "This PC" in left pane > click D: drive in right pane > click Microsoft Office > click Winword.

Using QA:
Open File Explorer > click Winword.

Without quick access, it takes 4 clicks to open the Winword folder on the D drive (which includes scanning the list of folders each time to find the one to click).

With quick access, it takes one click (with no need to scan lists of folders).

When you want to save a file from any program, the save dialog will show File Explorer. Just click the commonly used folder that you previously pinned in QA and you're there.

When you first use quick access, the default is to show folders in the C drive. Since you won't be saving data to the C drive anymore, just delete those C drive folders to clear the clutter. Just right click the unwanted folder and click "Unpin from quick access". No harm since you can always re-pin the deleted folders if desired.

Finally, for a very often used folder (Winword for me), pin a link to it on the Windows task bar. Then when you want to browse the Winword folder for a file, you can just open it instantly without even opening File Explorer. (When you want to save a file, the save dialog will show the QA to the Winword or other commonly used folder).

All of these tips save having to navigate to the D: drive and beyond.

Seems strange to have a special folder for Winword files. I have folders for specific projects with all manner of file types.

Even without QA, it's easy to navigate to the appropriate folder and open the required file. Don't forget that MS-Office apps also have a recently used file list that is quite handy.

There's so much more to MS-Word than the trivial issue of opening a file. I'm thinking of Templates and Styles, plus a host of other options.

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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 5,805
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

WryCuda wrote:

Seems strange to have a special folder for Winword files. I have folders for specific projects with all manner of file types.

Even without QA, it's easy to navigate to the appropriate folder and open the required file. Don't forget that MS-Office apps also have a recently used file list that is quite handy.

There's so much more to MS-Word than the trivial issue of opening a file. I'm thinking of Templates and Styles, plus a host of other options.

MS Office and Winword were just used as "examples" since they are fairly well known.  The original poster may not even use MS Office and can apply quick access to what he/she uses. 🤦‍♂️

Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,279
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively
3

WryCuda wrote:

There's so much more to MS-Word than the trivial issue of opening a file. I'm thinking of Templates and Styles, plus a host of other options.

You seem to be going out of your way to throw a bunch of red herrings into the discussion in an effort to diss the use of the Quick Access folder, but that doesn't change the fact that it can be quite useful. Remember, it's not just for Office apps - it's automagically available in every application on the system that uses the standard File Open and Save As dialogue boxes.

I find Quick Access to be invaluable because I don't use the standard Windows documents folders, so when I use those dialogue boxes it saves me from having to constantly navigate all the way down from "This PC" through the root folder of my data drive to find the folders I want.

a_c_skinner Forum Pro • Posts: 10,703
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

I've only just come to this thread again and noticed high up an expression of "hoping both drives don't fail".  Can we assume you have AT LEAST two complete, off line, copies of your original data?  Not of the programs or the indexing files or whatever but of the original stuff you created?

To answer your original point I'd simply put all your programs on the SSD drive and all your created stuff on the HDD and make sure you've numerous copies of the latter all kept disconnected except when updating them.  Your future tasks will be a lot easier if you set yourself a goal of never needing more disk space.  It will make you more sparing in what you shoot and more critical in what you keep and that will make you a much better photographer.

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WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 10,565
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively
1

Sean Nelson wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

There's so much more to MS-Word than the trivial issue of opening a file. I'm thinking of Templates and Styles, plus a host of other options.

I find Quick Access to be invaluable because I don't use the standard Windows documents folders, so when I use those dialogue boxes it saves me from having to constantly navigate all the way down from "This PC" through the root folder of my data drive to find the folders I want.

Nobody is seriously going to use the "standard" Windows document folders, and "navigating all the way down" as you suggest would indeed be amateurish. I like the flexibility of desktop shortcuts to data files, either local or network.

Describing rational ways to use either SSD or HDD is hardly a red herring in the context of this thread.

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Doug J Forum Pro • Posts: 11,126
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively
1

skyglider wrote:

21tones wrote:

Having read a few threads on this forum the general advice seems to be to put the OS and all programs on C and all data on D.

Absolutely.

When you first start doing this (after years of putting everything in your documents folder on the C drive), it can seem to be a hassle. Software will want to store data in your documents folder on the C drive. But you can go into the options/preferences of the software and designate which drive and folder to store the data. You only need to do this one time and the software will remember.

ANOTHER TIP:
Windows' File Explorer has "Quick Access" navigation in the left window pane. Learn how to use it and it will make accessing data on your D drive a ton easier. Here's one link on how to use Quick Access. Google Windows quick access to see a lot of other tutorials on using it. .....

In using Quick Access, suggest not pinning a lot of "specific" folders, otherwise it will become too cluttered. For example, say you use MS Office. On your D drive create a folder path to hold your data files as:

D:
....Microsoft Office
........ Excel
........ Winword

And say in the Winword folder you have 20 different folders for various documents. Now do not pin the individual folders in the Winword folder in Quick Access. Instead just pin the Winword folder. Then when you click it, you will instantly see the 20 different folders.

However, when you are working on a project, (say you are writing a long letter in MS word), then you can pin the specific folder that holds that specific Word document in Quick Access. This is a temporary pin that will give you quick access to that Word file. Delete that pin when your letter is complete.

In addition I would be using the computer for web browsing and e-mail.

I don't want to clutter up the C drive with the inevitable junk that results from this.

Is there any way to have e-mail and internet data go on to the D drive?

There are two types of email. IMAP and POP3.

POP3 stores all of your email on your PC's hard drive when you open the email. This does two things: 1) It clutters up your hard drive since it stores all of your email on the hard drive. 2) You cannot see the email on any other computer once it's downloaded to your PC.

I use MS Outlook for email on PCs and prefer POP3. This setting consolidates several accounts into a single Outlook.pst file, preferable for me when using multiple email accounts. Outlook has a setting for how long the original emails remain on the email servers before automatic deletion. I can access the email when traveling and still have the originals on the server when I connect with my desktop PC later at home.

MS Outlook POP3 configuration

IMAP stores all of your email on the server regardless whether you open the email or not. Therefore 1) it does not clutter your hard drive. 2) You can continue to see the email on any computer you use like your desktop and your laptop.

If you're already using IMAP, don't worry about email cluttering your hard drive. If you're using POP3, strongly suggest switching to IMAP.

Sky

Cheers,
Doug

OP 21tones Regular Member • Posts: 303
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

Thanks again for your further comments.

Now that it would seem that I have IMAP email that aspect of "clutter" can be dismissed.

Looking at my storage in the Settings tab of Windows 10 I can see that I have 50gb in my downloads folder. This would be 10% of the 500gb SSD before anything is even installed on it.

It seems to reinforce the need to put downloads onto the D drive so as to leave as much space on C for programmes and photo database/cache.

I will need to contact ON1 to see how this will affect the downloads of extras that I get from them and how they are incorporated into the program which would be on the C drive

Andrew Skinner - yes I will use 3 non SSD portable drives for backing up photos to.

I'm glad you said to disconnect these other than when using them. I wasn't sure whether to leave them connected all the time.

I will think about the Quick Access technique, but as I am retired, I really only create a handful of documents each year e.g. using powerpoint plus a few word documents.

I really appreciate you all taking the time to advise me.

I want to get this as right as I can with this new disc setup.

WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 10,565
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

21tones wrote:

Thanks again for your further comments.

Now that it would seem that I have IMAP email that aspect of "clutter" can be dismissed.

Looking at my storage in the Settings tab of Windows 10 I can see that I have 50gb in my downloads folder. This would be 10% of the 500gb SSD before anything is even installed on it.

Don't be overly concerned about filling up your SSD. I have a laptop with only a 120G SSD, and Win10 plus MS-Office and a goodly collection of programs and utilities only takes up 70Gb.

You'll probably find that most of your 50Gb of downloads can be deleted or saved elsewhere, but 50Gb isn't going to trouble a 500Gb SSD.

It seems to reinforce the need to put downloads onto the D drive so as to leave as much space on C for programmes and photo database/cache.

Yes.

I will need to contact ON1 to see how this will affect the downloads of extras that I get from them and how they are incorporated into the program which would be on the C drive

Andrew Skinner - yes I will use 3 non SSD portable drives for backing up photos to.

I'm glad you said to disconnect these other than when using them. I wasn't sure whether to leave them connected all the time.

I will think about the Quick Access technique, but as I am retired, I really only create a handful of documents each year e.g. using powerpoint plus a few word documents.

I really appreciate you all taking the time to advise me.

Some discussion already on QA (I won, by the way!!!). Seems to be irrelevant for your situation.

I want to get this as right as I can with this new disc setup.

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PHXAZCRAIG
PHXAZCRAIG Forum Pro • Posts: 17,397
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

21tones wrote:

Having read a few threads on this forum the general advice seems to be to put the OS and all programs on C and all data on D.

In addition I would be using the computer for web browsing and e-mail.

I don't want to clutter up the C drive with the inevitable junk that results from this.

Is there any way to have e-mail and internet data go on to the D drive?

(Although I don't want to clutter that either!)

I use ON1 software, and with my new drive setup will be, finally, cataloguing all my photos.

ON1 tell me it is not possible to backup the catalogue to an external drive and restore it to the C drive, if there are any problems with that drive, because of something to do with the GUID (which I don't understand).

So I will have to back up the catalogue from the C drive to the D drive and hope that both drives don't fail.

Does this sound right to you technical experts? I assumed I could do a full backup and restore it all onto the C drive if it had to be wiped e.g because of a virus.

There are at least two questions in here - one is how to manage keeping the SSD boot drive free from excess stuff, and the other has to do with restoring full backups.

Personally, I have an approach that uses two SSD's and one HDD, but it's basically the same as your system. I have the OS and programs running from the C drive, and I have a big HDD (8TB) to hold all my photos and videos. I have a separate system for backing everything up to a NAS (batch files that copy my photos every night at 2am), and another programs to back the NAS up to a second NAS. I've also tried backup programs (from the NAS and before) that are designed to do a full restore in the event I have to wipe out the boot drive. (That kind of backup/restore is known as disaster recovery. More below).

I add in second SSD as a working drive so I neither gum up the boot drive nor have to work on a slower HDD. But if your boot drive is big enough, just do some of the work there, if it makes a significant difference. I like my method because it tends to be easier to move to a new pc or do disaster recovery.

Here's the trick I suggest to keep excess stuff off your boot drive. I suggest you relocate the location of your default Windows folders Desktop, Documents, Downloads, Pictures, Music and Videos to point to your D drive. It's quite easy to do, and this link explains how: https://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-tip-move-your-default-data-folders-to-a-different-drive/

As for backup, just a little more information. If you need to restore some data to a working Windows system, you just need to back up that data and later copy it back. But if you need Disaster Recovery where you have to restore the entire PC, including the Windows boot system, then you need a particular kind of backup and restore program.

For Disaster Recovery, there are two issues: The first is copying all the files, including ones that are in use when running the backup software. Copying open files is a problem for most software. Some backup programs have to boot to their own OS to do this sort of backup, which of course means downtime for the length of the backup, and a reboot after. The other issue is restoring the data. You have to assume there is not a working Windows installation, so the restore program needs to boot up on it's own and be able to restore to a blank (or corrupted) disk, wiping out everything underneath.  Be sure to look for disaster recovery procedures in any backup software, or you may end up having to reinstall Windows and then the restore software before copying back any data.  (And in that scenario it's likely you would also have to reinstall all your software.)

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Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,279
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

WryCuda wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

There's so much more to MS-Word than the trivial issue of opening a file. I'm thinking of Templates and Styles, plus a host of other options.

I find Quick Access to be invaluable because I don't use the standard Windows documents folders, so when I use those dialogue boxes it saves me from having to constantly navigate all the way down from "This PC" through the root folder of my data drive to find the folders I want.

Nobody is seriously going to use the "standard" Windows document folders, and "navigating all the way down" as you suggest would indeed be amateurish.

You keep ignoring the point I'm making about being able to use Quick Access links within File Open and Save As dialogue boxes. Of course I have links on my desktop to access my folders, but to get to those links from a file dialogue box is more work than just going via Quick Access.

(Side note:  I don't actually have links on the desktop itself, because those are hidden by whatever programs are open.  I have the links on the Quick Launch toolbar which is always visible at the bottom of the screen).

WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 10,565
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

Sean Nelson wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

There's so much more to MS-Word than the trivial issue of opening a file. I'm thinking of Templates and Styles, plus a host of other options.

I find Quick Access to be invaluable because I don't use the standard Windows documents folders, so when I use those dialogue boxes it saves me from having to constantly navigate all the way down from "This PC" through the root folder of my data drive to find the folders I want.

Nobody is seriously going to use the "standard" Windows document folders, and "navigating all the way down" as you suggest would indeed be amateurish.

You keep ignoring the point I'm making about being able to use Quick Access links within File Open and Save As dialogue boxes. Of course I have links on my desktop to access my folders, but to get to those links from a file dialogue box is more work than just going via Quick Access.

I'm not ignoring QA and the limited benefits that are derived, but it just doesn't suit the way that we work in my office.

The OP states...

I will think about the Quick Access technique, but as I am retired, I really only create a handful of documents each year e.g. using powerpoint plus a few word documents.

In this case, My Documents seems like the obvious file location.

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OP 21tones Regular Member • Posts: 303
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

Thanks for your further responses.

I am still awaiting a response from ON1 as well waiting to get my computer back from the tech.

Before I start installing and configuring everything I may run past you what I propose to do given the advice in this thread.

Phoenix Arizona Craig - do you use particular software for your disaster recovery?

edispics
edispics Veteran Member • Posts: 4,404
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

Vunite wrote:

21tones wrote:

A couple of weeks ago I got great advice on this forum on how best to update my ageing computer. Basically, put in an SSD as C drive and use existing HDD for photo storage.

It's certainly advisable to put the OS (C:) on the SSD, as well as all applications. If it's large enough then you can aprtition it and have a D or whatever on the SSD,

Here's a not bad little pros and cons discussion on partitioning in 2020

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/is-it-important-to-partition-my-hard-drive-for/9be287f3-d658-4751-969c-be06fc308c3f

Short answer - it's 2020, except for a few specific cases - just don't.

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supersargas Contributing Member • Posts: 538
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

21tones wrote:

Thankyou to everyone for your speedy and helpful responses.

I am in the UK and use Virgin Media's email. I don't know whether it is POP or IMAP.

My email indicates I have used 2.68gb of a 25gb quota. Does this imply it is stored on their server? I also access the email on my phone, so I guess it must be?

In an article on the ON1 website they indicate that 50,000 photos catalogued at what they call standard size would take up 53gb storage space using a 1920 x 1080 monitor.

50,000 photos using a 4k monitor would take 85gb.

I use 2k so I guess it is somewhere between those figures.

Thanks for the reminder about Macrium Free. I have never done a system backup before but know I need to start to do this sort of thing.

When I asked on1 about backing up to an external drive with a full system backup they said

"Currently the only way to back up, catalogs and cache are to use a full system back up.
This only works for the current system, and would not restore files to a new machine.

Any type of backup, currently, would require a full back up on the existing machine, and does not allow for a complete restore to a new computer, due to file differences in the (GUID)"

I didn't ask them about restoring to a new computer, but back to the existing one e.g. if it got a virus and the C drive needed to be wiped.

As I say I just don't understand this.

I won't respond to anything else tonight as my wife wants me to do some jobs now!

But I will tomorrow if anyone makes any further comments

Thank you again

I already considered most programs to be a scam. This is barbaric. It makes no sense. You would be better off making your own archive structure and using the program strictly to process the files and nothing else.

edispics
edispics Veteran Member • Posts: 4,404
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

21tones wrote:

Thanks for your further responses.

I am still awaiting a response from ON1 as well waiting to get my computer back from the tech.

Before I start installing and configuring everything I may run past you what I propose to do given the advice in this thread.

Phoenix Arizona Craig - do you use particular software for your disaster recovery?

You don't have to wait for On1, they publish this info:

Q. Where does the data that backs up a cataloged folder live?

A. The data is stored in two locations. First, every photo you catalog or edit has an .on1 sidecar file created next to it. This small text file contains the photo's metadata and editing settings. These make it easy to move and share photos across multiple computers. They also provide a back-up for your settings. Second, there are caches of preview images and database files for metadata and settings. These live inside your application support (app data) folders.

Q. How much space does the cataloged folder cache and databases take up, and can I move them?

A. The preview cache can grow to be pretty significant. Its size depends on the number of photos cataloged, the size of the primary display, and the preview size option you select when creating a cataloged folder.

You can set the location of the image caches in the Preferences dialog. Moving the cache to a fast external drive can free up space on your boot volume. The cache folders cannot be moved to another computer at this time.

The databases live in the same application support folders. They use a relatively small amount of storage and cannot be moved at this time.

Here

https://on1help.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360035750991-Catalogs-and-Caches-ON1-Photo-RAW-2020

This means you don't have to worry about the stuff that is in AppData and can't be moved. The space hog is the preview cache which can be located wherever you want through Preferences setting.

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PHXAZCRAIG
PHXAZCRAIG Forum Pro • Posts: 17,397
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

21tones wrote:

Phoenix Arizona Craig - do you use particular software for your disaster recovery?

Yes, and no.   I run a business system at home as well as my personal stuff, and it all sort of merges together.  I have a QNAP NAS for backup (and another to back that one up), and it comes with some software packages to use for this kind of backup.   I find it somewhat intrusive, so I did a full backup some time ago and then uninstalled the product on my PC's.   I don't really need disaster recovery all that much - I've been through so many that my whole system is sort of designed around not being too dependent on one PC.

I'm running 3 laptops and 3 desktops, plus a business laptop my fiance uses for work (at home).  I have a special folder that has held my main business files since the 1990's and ichanges are synchronized to a server and then sync'd back down to other PC's.  My photos and videos are saved to certain drives that are backed up with copy commands in a batch file.   And I have set things up such that it's easier to replace a PC with a new one as I have the data mostly separate from the OS drive.   It's a pain to recover from a disaster, but mainly because I have to reinstall all the software, not from losing any data.   At least with new PC's and SSD's it is much quicker to reinstall things now.

I also have virtual servers that I back up with other disaster-recovery-capable systems.   I run 15 servers under VMWare, and I have backed those up with a program called Nakivo.  But I also use a (free) program called Veeam that makes a completely-usable working backup copy of each of my servers such that if the source goes down, I can simply fire up a replica in its place, and the replica is updated with changes each night via Veeam.

Because I've been building PC's, servers and networks since ... 1994, I'm aware what it takes to recover from a disaster, with or without backups.   So far, the worst loss I've had was 2 months of primary files from early 2015 when I had missed updating a backup program for the new year.  (Missed a folder for 2015.  I lost all my NEF files from a trip to Tahiti.)

Anyway, the thing about disaster recovery is that it is designed to replace the OS as well as the data, so that a restore immediately gives you a working system, without needing that system to run the restore.  The alternative is to have to reinstall the OS in order to do the data restore.  Sometimes reinstalling the OS is an advantage, except in the amount of time needed to recover.

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kelpdiver Veteran Member • Posts: 4,573
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively
1

edispics wrote:

Here's a not bad little pros and cons discussion on partitioning in 2020

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/is-it-important-to-partition-my-hard-drive-for/9be287f3-d658-4751-969c-be06fc308c3f

Short answer - it's 2020, except for a few specific cases - just don't.

may god have mercy on those foolish enough to go into a Microsoft forum for advice.

this one was a pretty good example of why.

The April patch release crippled my win10 install rather nicely - couldn't load images from File Explorer and couldn't update at all from the Store.   Had to reinstall.

Data separation worked just fine.   In spite of the author's claim, you're more likely to get a borked windows install than a failure of your drive and backup.

Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,279
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively

kelpdiver wrote:

The April patch release crippled my win10 install rather nicely - couldn't load images from File Explorer and couldn't update at all from the Store. Had to reinstall.

Data separation worked just fine. In spite of the author's claim, you're more likely to get a borked windows install than a failure of your drive and backup.

To be fair to the author of that piece, the one instance in which he (grudgingly) admitted that a separate data partition might be OK would be if you have different backup strategies for your data vs. your OS image.

I keep my data on a separate partition (actually, a separate drive) for that reason, also for the reason you've just mentioned - I don't want Windows hijinx anywhere near my data.  If I have to restore Windows to a previous state I can do so on its own drive without any worries whatsoever about what it will do to my data.

edispics
edispics Veteran Member • Posts: 4,404
Re: How to use new SSD and HDD drives most effectively
1

kelpdiver wrote:

edispics wrote:

Here's a not bad little pros and cons discussion on partitioning in 2020

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/is-it-important-to-partition-my-hard-drive-for/9be287f3-d658-4751-969c-be06fc308c3f

Short answer - it's 2020, except for a few specific cases - just don't.

may god have mercy on those foolish enough to go into a Microsoft forum for advice.

this one was a pretty good example of why.

The April patch release crippled my win10 install rather nicely - couldn't load images from File Explorer and couldn't update at all from the Store. Had to reinstall.

Data separation worked just fine. In spite of the author's claim, you're more likely to get a borked windows install than a failure of your drive and backup.

I have my OS and pgms on C and my data is on D all the way up through the alphabet.

I have data separation, I don't need the unnecessary partitioning of my C drive to accomplish that.

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Panasonic ZS100 Nikon Z6 Nikon D7200 Nikon D7000 Nikon D70 +25 more
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