Nikon and their binoculars.

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
R Liewenberger Senior Member • Posts: 1,146
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

FrancoD wrote:

We do get several types in our backyard too . Ravens, doves, creasted pigeons, blackbirds, New Holland Honeyeaters, White Plumed Honeyeaters, Wattlebirds, Silvereye, minahs , sparrows and occasionaly cockatoos and galahs. One that has come to visit of late is a young Pied Currawong that taps on my window and then waits for me to go out and say hello. Possibly it was born on one of those trees at the back because it seems to know me.

(we don't feed them...)

A nice one! Reminds me of our crows, with the exeption of these white spots.

Had to look it up; the German name would be Weissbürzel-Krähenstar https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wei%C3%9Fb%C3%BCrzel-Kr%C3%A4henstar

Liewenberger

R Liewenberger Senior Member • Posts: 1,146
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

FrancoD wrote:

Leica Eye wrote:

After many years of jumping between various manufacturers, I went for a set of Leica's.. Night & Day over all the others.. great investment.. Leica can service if required - Mine are now 40years old, still crystal clear..... L

No doubt about Leica bino quality ( I have had three of those and still have one ) but even Leica now has some of their binos made in the same Japanese factory that makes a LOT of the top brands, including many of the Nikon binoculars.

(a clue for some :JB133)

Here in Germany it's usually forestry officers/hunters owning the nicest binoculars and for most of them this still means Zeiss.

For decades, their favourite one used to be something 7x50. I still have my grandfather's 7x50 Zeiss, 90 years old now (but relatively heavy and optically not really comparable to anything modern).

I also have my father's Optolyth 8x56, from the mid seventies, a pretty good one.

An ex-boss, also a hunter, loved his little Zeiss 10x42; he used to call it 'the Ferrari of binoculars'. That was in the early eighties, when more and more hunters started also using something smaller and more light-weight, compared to the old classics.

The nicest one I could ever look through was a friend's stabilized Zeiss 20x60, that was just 'Wow'! He got it brand-new for about 3,500 DM; these days now they are about plus/minus €6,000.

No idea about Japanese ones; the only one I ever owned (for a week or two) was a Tasco 8x56, nothing to write home about and also rather heavy, compared to the Optolyth. But I could imagine modern Japanese ones are a lot better now and optically much closer now to something Zeiss/Leica, just less expensive.

Liewenberger

Doug J Forum Pro • Posts: 11,123
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

FrancoD wrote:

About 280 species have been spottet there.

My best, as far as hard to get bird, was a pair of brolgas, a type of under threat stork.

here is one :

Nice. Here are some of their cousins, Sandhill Cranes.

Cheers,
Doug

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 14,223
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

R Liewenberger wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

We do get several types in our backyard too . Ravens, doves, creasted pigeons, blackbirds, New Holland Honeyeaters, White Plumed Honeyeaters, Wattlebirds, Silvereye, minahs , sparrows and occasionaly cockatoos and galahs. One that has come to visit of late is a young Pied Currawong that taps on my window and then waits for me to go out and say hello. Possibly it was born on one of those trees at the back because it seems to know me.

(we don't feed them...)

A nice one! Reminds me of our crows, with the exeption of these white spots.

Had to look it up; the German name would be Weissbürzel-Krähenstar https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wei%C3%9Fb%C3%BCrzel-Kr%C3%A4henstar

Liewenberger

We don't have crows here ( I mean right where I am) but ravens. Most people call them crows but they are a different bird. I took this photo for a guy that wanted to see the eye of a raven :

Lensmate
Lensmate Veteran Member • Posts: 5,077
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

FrancoD wrote:

We have flying rats too ( pigeons and seagulls) .

That's a pretty derogatory opinion. Crows are highly intelligent birds!

How Smart Are Crows? | ScienceTake | The New York Times - YouTube

-Martin P

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 14,223
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.
1

Lensmate wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

We have flying rats too ( pigeons and seagulls) .

That's a pretty derogatory opinion. Crows are highly intelligent birds!

How Smart Are Crows? | ScienceTake | The New York Times - YouTube

-Martin P

Intelligent enough to notice I did not mention them.

Lensmate
Lensmate Veteran Member • Posts: 5,077
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

FrancoD wrote:

Lensmate wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

We have flying rats too ( pigeons and seagulls) .

That's a pretty derogatory opinion. Crows are highly intelligent birds!

How Smart Are Crows? | ScienceTake | The New York Times - YouTube

-Martin P

Intelligent enough to notice I did not mention them.

But not intelligent enough to acknowledge that pigeons and seagulls are NOT flying rats...?

-Martin P

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R Liewenberger Senior Member • Posts: 1,146
Re:

FrancoD wrote:

We don't have crows here ( I mean right where I am) but ravens. Most people call them crows but they are a different bird. I took this photo for a guy that wanted to see the eye of a raven :

With that eye it reminds me of what we call Dohle, another member of that Rabenvögel (literally: Raven birds) family. https://www.nabu.de/tiere-und-pflanzen/aktionen-und-projekte/stunde-der-gartenvoegel/voegel-bestimmen/13769.html Yours might be what we call Tasmankrähe, Tasman crow (Corvus tasmanicus), what the English language version of Wikipedia calls Forest raven or Tasmanian raven https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest_raven

What I can see over here most the time is probably the Rabenkrähe (Raven crow), the first one when following the above nabu link.

Here are some little pictures of such a Rabenkrähe from 2012, technically nothing great, oh well. One was watching me, when I was feeding my cats with chicken wings, so I decided to also throw one of these wings in its direction to see how it might react.

Was interesting to see how that bird landed in maybe two meters distance and then came slowly walking towards the chicken wing. Next step was having a closer look at that food before touching it with its beak. What I liked best was to see how the bird jumped upwards/backwards, right after it touched that chicken wing for the very first time. Realizing that this food wouldn't fight back, the next step was picking it up and carrying it away:

Last not least, to the OP, C Sean: Sorry, but it was really not my intention to hijack your binoculars thread!

To poster Lensmate: Nobody denies crows/ravens being highly intelligent birds, maybe even the most intelligent ones! But just like pigeons they can be a real plague/pest in some German cities! Just google 'Krähenplage' (or 'Kraehenplage')!

Liewenberger

Lensmate
Lensmate Veteran Member • Posts: 5,077
Re:

R Liewenberger wrote:

To poster lensmate: Nobody denies crows/ravens being highly intelligent birds, maybe even the most intelligent ones! But just like pigeons they can be a real plague/pest in some German cities! Just google 'Krähenplage' (or 'Kraehenplage')!

Liewenberger

Birds have been on the planet over 60 million years ago... if anything, birds must regard us humans as the real pest/plague....lol

-Martin P

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 14,223
Re:

The one I posted is called here Australian Raven. There is a Forest Raven (Corvus Tasmanicus) that is widespread in Tasmania, very similar but not the same bird. We don't get them in my area but can be found in our state .

This is one of those Forest Ravens (not my photo) :

and this is the Australian Raven (Corvus Coronoides) :

The Forest type is larger, note the long legs

For Australians, this is how to tell the difference between a raven and a crow :

the easiest is to look at the tail in flight.

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 14,223
Re:

BTW, funny thing is that rats are intelligent too, yet, like some previously mentioned creatures , they can be  and often are vermin.

Maybe the distinction between intelligence and pest is not all that clear to some.

MHshooter
MHshooter Senior Member • Posts: 1,010
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

Chinese binos are junk, even the $500 Zeiss Chinese binos.

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 14,223
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

MHshooter wrote:

Chinese binos are junk, even the $500 Zeiss Chinese binos.

Compared to what ?

MHshooter
MHshooter Senior Member • Posts: 1,010
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.

FrancoD wrote:

MHshooter wrote:

Chinese binos are junk, even the $500 Zeiss Chinese binos.

Compared to what ?

Compared to made-in-Germany Leica and Zeiss, older Japanese top-end binos.  Particularly roof-prism binos  that need very precise engineering to really be good, to have the most accurate alignment and optical quality.  This is why binos made by Zeiss Germany for instance decades ago bring such high prices on Ebay.

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 14,223
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.
1

MHshooter wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

MHshooter wrote:

Chinese binos are junk, even the $500 Zeiss Chinese binos.

Compared to what ?

Compared to made-in-Germany Leica and Zeiss, older Japanese top-end binos. Particularly roof-prism binos that need very precise engineering to really be good, to have the most accurate alignment and optical quality. This is why binos made by Zeiss Germany for instance decades ago bring such high prices on Ebay.

In that case you should have commented that all binos not made in Germany by Zeiss and Leica are junk.

What about Leica binos made in Portugal or those made in Japan ?

I think that nostalgia and snobbism is clouding your thinking.

BTW, there is a very good chance that the "older Japanese top-end binos" were made by the same manufacturer that makes most of the top end Japanese binoculars now as well as those Zeiss made in China and the made in Japan Leica .

MHshooter
MHshooter Senior Member • Posts: 1,010
Re: Nikon and their binoculars.
1

FrancoD wrote:

MHshooter wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

MHshooter wrote:

Chinese binos are junk, even the $500 Zeiss Chinese binos.

Compared to what ?

Compared to made-in-Germany Leica and Zeiss, older Japanese top-end binos. Particularly roof-prism binos that need very precise engineering to really be good, to have the most accurate alignment and optical quality. This is why binos made by Zeiss Germany for instance decades ago bring such high prices on Ebay.

In that case you should have commented that all binos not made in Germany by Zeiss and Leica are junk.

What about Leica binos made in Portugal or those made in Japan ?

I think that nostalgia and snobbism is clouding your thinking.

Vast experience with it has shown me what is trash and what isn't.  Some people are just not very discerning.  For instance;  most binoculars don't support the edge of the field very well and render an image with a lot of aberrations.  Most people won't notice that.

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