uniwb file for x-h1?

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
mainoo Regular Member • Posts: 117
uniwb file for x-h1?

I shoot raw and have always known that I need to overexpose by quite a bit (typically +1.3/+1.7) to get a decent exposure but I'm only guessing. I'm told that I can get a more precise idea of the correct raw exposure by setting my WB to UniWB and looking at the histogram (which will then closely match the raw histogram).  A lot of this I am taking on trust but I believe that If I use a tool like rawdigger, I can, at least, see how good the results are.

I have looked at some of the steps for creating a UniWB jpeg and it's more hassle than I am willing to go through. Is it feasible to take a pre-prepared uniWB JPEG file and use it to set the white balance? Looking at the manual, it doesn't look like the x-h1 can read its WB from a JPEG so I'm thinking I would have to make a UniWB target. Any views on the feasibility of this would be appreciated.

Even more appreciated would be an actual uniWB file that I can  use - have tried looking online and found some for other cameras but none for Fujifilm (yet).

Thanks in advance.

Fujifilm X-H1
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Ysarex
Ysarex Senior Member • Posts: 2,763
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

Someone else's Unity WB target isn't going to be entirely accurate for your camera -- for one the computer displays are different.

You can display a Unity WB file on a computer display and set WB from that. Load the Unity WB file in an image editor so you can alter the color. You're going to need to be able to raise/lower the values in the red and blue channels. Leave the green channel alone.

After you set the WB from the target displayed on your monitor take a photo. Open the raw file and read the EXIF data -- see screen shot below from RawDigger. Your goal is to have the both red and blue values = 1 or as close as you can get.

If your values are off make adjustments in the image editor to the red and/or blue channels and repeat the process until you reach the target.

Below is my Unity WB target for my XT-2. Hopefully it will get you ballparked and you'll be able to tweak it from there.

Erik Baumgartner Senior Member • Posts: 3,211
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

mainoo wrote:

I shoot raw and have always known that I need to overexpose by quite a bit (typically +1.3/+1.7) to get a decent exposure but I'm only guessing. I'm told that I can get a more precise idea of the correct raw exposure by setting my WB to UniWB and looking at the histogram (which will then closely match the raw histogram). A lot of this I am taking on trust but I believe that If I use a tool like rawdigger, I can, at least, see how good the results are.

I have looked at some of the steps for creating a UniWB jpeg and it's more hassle than I am willing to go through. Is it feasible to take a pre-prepared uniWB JPEG file and use it to set the white balance? Looking at the manual, it doesn't look like the x-h1 can read its WB from a JPEG so I'm thinking I would have to make a UniWB target. Any views on the feasibility of this would be appreciated.

Even more appreciated would be an actual uniWB file that I can use - have tried looking online and found some for other cameras but none for Fujifilm (yet).

Thanks in advance.

I use the blinkies with Multi metering and a normal looking EVF and get the exposure pretty much exactly where I want it every time. By all means, try the UniWB method, but you don’t need it to expose your RAW files correctly.

 Erik Baumgartner's gear list:Erik Baumgartner's gear list
Fujifilm X100V Fujifilm X-T2 Fujifilm X-T20 Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R +2 more
OP mainoo Regular Member • Posts: 117
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

Ysarex wrote:

Someone else's Unity WB target isn't going to be entirely accurate for your camera -- for one the computer displays are different.

You can display a Unity WB file on a computer display and set WB from that. Load the Unity WB file in an image editor so you can alter the color. You're going to need to be able to raise/lower the values in the red and blue channels. Leave the green channel alone.

After you set the WB from the target displayed on your monitor take a photo. Open the raw file and read the EXIF data -- see screen shot below from RawDigger. Your goal is to have the both red and blue values = 1 or as close as you can get.

If your values are off make adjustments in the image editor to the red and/or blue channels and repeat the process until you reach the target.

Below is my Unity WB target for my XT-2. Hopefully it will get you ballparked and you'll be able to tweak it from there.

Thank you so much. I've been reading so much of your output, I feel like I know you!

Once I have set the WB on my camera, does it matter what I take a a photo of or do you mean, take a photo of the target (what I assumed)?

Thanks again.

OP mainoo Regular Member • Posts: 117
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

Erik Baumgartner wrote:

mainoo wrote:

I shoot raw and have always known that I need to overexpose by quite a bit (typically +1.3/+1.7) to get a decent exposure but I'm only guessing. I'm told that I can get a more precise idea of the correct raw exposure by setting my WB to UniWB and looking at the histogram (which will then closely match the raw histogram). A lot of this I am taking on trust but I believe that If I use a tool like rawdigger, I can, at least, see how good the results are.

I have looked at some of the steps for creating a UniWB jpeg and it's more hassle than I am willing to go through. Is it feasible to take a pre-prepared uniWB JPEG file and use it to set the white balance? Looking at the manual, it doesn't look like the x-h1 can read its WB from a JPEG so I'm thinking I would have to make a UniWB target. Any views on the feasibility of this would be appreciated.

Even more appreciated would be an actual uniWB file that I can use - have tried looking online and found some for other cameras but none for Fujifilm (yet).

Thanks in advance.

I use the blinkies with Multi metering and a normal looking EVF and get the exposure pretty much exactly where I want it every time. By all means, try the UniWB method, but you don’t need it to expose your RAW files correctly.

Thanks for responding. I might end up doing trying that option (if I can't get uniwb to work, but I'm gonna give that a good go) - I would love to be able to nail the exposure as the proponents of WB seem to.

Ysarex
Ysarex Senior Member • Posts: 2,763
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

mainoo wrote:

Ysarex wrote:

Someone else's Unity WB target isn't going to be entirely accurate for your camera -- for one the computer displays are different.

You can display a Unity WB file on a computer display and set WB from that. Load the Unity WB file in an image editor so you can alter the color. You're going to need to be able to raise/lower the values in the red and blue channels. Leave the green channel alone.

After you set the WB from the target displayed on your monitor take a photo. Open the raw file and read the EXIF data -- see screen shot below from RawDigger. Your goal is to have the both red and blue values = 1 or as close as you can get.

If your values are off make adjustments in the image editor to the red and/or blue channels and repeat the process until you reach the target.

Below is my Unity WB target for my XT-2. Hopefully it will get you ballparked and you'll be able to tweak it from there.

Thank you so much. I've been reading so much of your output, I feel like I know you!

Once I have set the WB on my camera, does it matter what I take a a photo of or do you mean, take a photo of the target (what I assumed)?

Thanks again.

Take a photo of anything -- point the camera out the window.

michaeladawson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,890
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

I found setting up uniWB really simple to do with just a monitor, a software program that will allow you to make a color swatch of known RGB values, and an EXIF reader.  It's really not that hard.

Put a magenta swatch on the computer screen.  Create a custom WB with the camera using the swatch.  Take a picture and use the EXIF tool to verify that you have unity coefficients for RGB.  Adjust the color swatch according to the coefficients and repeat the process.

If you find setting up uniWB to be too much trouble then I would might suggest that uniWB is probably not for you.

-- hide signature --

Mike Dawson

 michaeladawson's gear list:michaeladawson's gear list
Nikon D7200 Nikon D5 Fujifilm X-T2 Fujifilm X-H1 Nikon Z7 +34 more
OP mainoo Regular Member • Posts: 117
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

michaeladawson wrote:

I found setting up uniWB really simple to do with just a monitor, a software program that will allow you to make a color swatch of known RGB values, and an EXIF reader. It's really not that hard.

Put a magenta swatch on the computer screen. Create a custom WB with the camera using the swatch. Take a picture and use the EXIF tool to verify that you have unity coefficients for RGB. Adjust the color swatch according to the coefficients and repeat the process.

If you find setting up uniWB to be too much trouble then I would might suggest that uniWB is probably not for you.

why? what does creating a uniwb jpeg have to do with using one?

The steps that have been suggested above are a damn sight simpler and easier to follow than others that I have seen.

Thanks for the response anyway.

OP mainoo Regular Member • Posts: 117
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

ok. Thanks for clarifying.

RetiringGuy Regular Member • Posts: 426
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

Suggestion.

Use RawDigger and the blinking exposure warnings of your X-H1 to find out how much exposure compensation is needed so that none of the colour channels are being limited (overloaded).

Yes the technique will only get you to within 1/3 stop of the critical exposure but all you need is the camera and a white/grey target

You will need a lens with an aperture ring and a photographic target scene where the illumination DOES NOT change and the brightest part of the scene is basically as grey/white as you can get it.

Make sure your camera does not move during the testing.

Select an appropriate ISO speed for your normal work.

Select a Film simulation for your normal work.

Select an aperture in the middle of its available range.

Switch on the blinkies and adjust the shutter speed so that the blinkies are either just starting or just stopping. Make a note of the shutter speed and aperture value.

Take a shot.

Adjust either the shutter speed OR aperture up AND down in 1/3 stop steps while keeping the other (aperture or shutter speed) the same as you started with and take a shot at each setting combination. (i.e. take shots at 1/3 stop increments above and below the onset of the blinkies.

Look at your RAW shots in RawDigger and select the most exposed shot that does not have any colour chanel limiting. Look at the shutter speed and aperture values to see how many 1/3 stop steps it is above or below the point of the onset of the blinkies.

For that ISO and film simulation you now know how many 1/3 stop steps you need to adjust your exposure above or below the onset of blinkies in order not to overload any of the colour channels and you can dial that into the Exposure Compensation adjustment.

I normally use ISO 200 and nothing else but its quite probable that the results won't change much for a reasonable range of ISO but will probably change with change of film simulation.

Hope this helps.

RG

OP mainoo Regular Member • Posts: 117
Re: uniwb file for x-h1?

RetiringGuy wrote:

Suggestion.

Use RawDigger and the blinking exposure warnings of your X-H1 to find out how much exposure compensation is needed so that none of the colour channels are being limited (overloaded).

Yes the technique will only get you to within 1/3 stop of the critical exposure but all you need is the camera and a white/grey target

You will need a lens with an aperture ring and a photographic target scene where the illumination DOES NOT change and the brightest part of the scene is basically as grey/white as you can get it.

Make sure your camera does not move during the testing.

Select an appropriate ISO speed for your normal work.

Select a Film simulation for your normal work.

Select an aperture in the middle of its available range.

Switch on the blinkies and adjust the shutter speed so that the blinkies are either just starting or just stopping. Make a note of the shutter speed and aperture value.

Take a shot.

Adjust either the shutter speed OR aperture up AND down in 1/3 stop steps while keeping the other (aperture or shutter speed) the same as you started with and take a shot at each setting combination. (i.e. take shots at 1/3 stop increments above and below the onset of the blinkies.

Look at your RAW shots in RawDigger and select the most exposed shot that does not have any colour chanel limiting. Look at the shutter speed and aperture values to see how many 1/3 stop steps it is above or below the point of the onset of the blinkies.

For that ISO and film simulation you now know how many 1/3 stop steps you need to adjust your exposure above or below the onset of blinkies in order not to overload any of the colour channels and you can dial that into the Exposure Compensation adjustment.

I normally use ISO 200 and nothing else but its quite probable that the results won't change much for a reasonable range of ISO but will probably change with change of film simulation.

Hope this helps.

RG

Thank you very much for your suggestion. I will indeed be doing something like this if I can't get uniwb to work (or if I want a jpeg as well) with slight modifications. I mainly shoot people wide open so I will use that as my aperture. I will test at iso 200, 800 and 1600. I'll start with astia (liked its look as a film).

Thanks again.

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