Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Started 3 months ago | Questions
Batdude
Batdude Veteran Member • Posts: 4,977
Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

I got my new computer screen glasses prescription today and I was asked if I wanted to pay extra for that type of coating.  I don’t know anything about this coating and I’m not sure if is a gimmick.  Is it not and should I get that on my glasses?  Do any of you have it?

What they did told me is that the glasses do have some kind of “purple looking tint” and as soon as they said that I told them I would get back to them on that because if I’m PP photos in Lightroom how is that purple looking tint going to affect my workflow?  Am I going to run into issues because I’ll be seeing weird colors on the monitor??

Will appreciate more info from folks that have or are using these type of coating.

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Eric Carlson
Eric Carlson Veteran Member • Posts: 6,869
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Buy them at ZenniOptical. It's where we buy all our glasses. You can get a pair with blue filter for probably around $25, I'm guesstimating. It's probably cheaper than just the coating alone from your glasses store.

https://www.zennioptical.com/

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Batdude
OP Batdude Veteran Member • Posts: 4,977
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
1

Eric Carlson wrote:

Buy them at ZenniOptical. It's where we buy all our glasses. You can get a pair with blue filter for probably around $25, I'm guesstimating. It's probably cheaper than just the coating alone from your glasses store.

https://www.zennioptical.com/

Eric, thanks for the tip but it sounds like you didn’t read my post at all. I’m not asking where to buy them.

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RDKirk Forum Pro • Posts: 15,929
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Batdude wrote:

I got my new computer screen glasses prescription today and I was asked if I wanted to pay extra for that type of coating. I don’t know anything about this coating and I’m not sure if is a gimmick. Is it not and should I get that on my glasses? Do any of you have it?

What they did told me is that the glasses do have some kind of “purple looking tint” and as soon as they said that I told them I would get back to them on that because if I’m PP photos in Lightroom how is that purple looking tint going to affect my workflow? Am I going to run into issues because I’ll be seeing weird colors on the monitor??

Will appreciate more info from folks that have or are using these type of coating.

Some blue-light filtering lenses are just mild amber tints that will affect your edit vision. Some more expensive lenses use a more sophisticated wave-lenth cut off filter that I believe does look purple-tinted when viewed at certain angles.

There is some evidence that late night staring into the blue light from typical daylight balanced LEDs delays melatonin production and thus can throw off a person's sleep cycle.

Claims that LED screens cause any kind of actual eye damage have not been verified by any real data.

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RDKirk
'TANSTAAFL: The only unbreakable rule in photography.'

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Austinian
MOD Austinian Forum Pro • Posts: 10,743
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
2

Batdude wrote:

I got my new computer screen glasses prescription today and I was asked if I wanted to pay extra for that type of coating. I don’t know anything about this coating and I’m not sure if is a gimmick. Is it not and should I get that on my glasses? Do any of you have it?

What they did told me is that the glasses do have some kind of “purple looking tint” and as soon as they said that I told them I would get back to them on that because if I’m PP photos in Lightroom how is that purple looking tint going to affect my workflow? Am I going to run into issues because I’ll be seeing weird colors on the monitor??

Will appreciate more info from folks that have or are using these type of coating.

I had that on a previous pair of glasses. The narrow-band blue-light filter was so subtle, I really didn't notice a visible difference for normal use, but I decided that setting the "Night Light" function in Windows for night viewing was more effective and cost nothing.

(Of course I would certainly not use "Night LIght" when editing photos, but I don't edit late at night anyway.)

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Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,143
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Anti-reflective coating is not the same as "blue blocker" - it's a thin coating meant to prevent light from reflecting off the lenses. You see this in camera lenses, and in that application it's very important because those lenses have many elements which can reflect light and cause flare and lower contrast in the picture. The coating is a lot less important in eyeglasses because there's only one element. The only difference I can imagine is that it might reduce a bit of reflections from the rear that you pick up in the extreme outer corners of the lens.

My glasses are coated, but I can't really tell if the coating makes much of a difference.

The coating will appear to have a bit of a blue or purplish tint if you take the glasses off and look at the front surface obliquely to see the light reflected off it, but it doesn't affect the light passing through to your eye and you don't need to worry about colour shifts.

Batdude
OP Batdude Veteran Member • Posts: 4,977
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Sean Nelson wrote:

Anti-reflective coating is not the same as "blue blocker"

You are 100% correct.  Before getting la six surgery many years ago I would always get anti reflective glasses, but I have never had that blue light blocker.

- it's a thin coating meant to prevent light from reflecting off the lenses. You see this in camera lenses, and in that application it's very important because those lenses have many elements which can reflect light and cause flare and lower contrast in the picture. The coating is a lot less important in eyeglasses because there's only one element. The only difference I can imagine is that it might reduce a bit of reflections from the rear that you pick up in the extreme outer corners of the lens.

My glasses are coated, but I can't really tell if the coating makes much of a difference.

The coating will appear to have a bit of a blue or purplish tint if you take the glasses off and look at the front surface obliquely to see the light reflected off it, but it doesn't affect the light passing through to your eye and you don't need to worry about colour shifts.

Yes I did see that purplish coating on the doctor’s glasses, he had it, but he didn’t know anything about editing photos with it.

Im going to ask them if they give me a few days to try the blue light blocker and if don’t like them they can change them to no blue light blocker if not I’ll just get them with it because I don’t want to run into an unpleasant surprise and not get a refund.

From the little bit I have read about this some people do see some funky color shifts but then again who knows where they went to get their glasses.

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Billiam29 Senior Member • Posts: 1,834
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
1

I’m not sure what you’re considering the “front” surface, but anti-reflective coating only needs to be applied to the interior surface of eyeglass lenses. The surface facing your eyes. For eyeglasses there’s really no functional purpose to having it applied to the “exterior” surface that faces away from your eyes.

Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,143
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
2

Billiam29 wrote:

I’m not sure what you’re considering the “front” surface, but anti-reflective coating only needs to be applied to the interior surface of eyeglass lenses. The surface facing your eyes. For eyeglasses there’s really no functional purpose to having it applied to the “exterior” surface that faces away from your eyes.

All true, but you can see the colour tint from either the front or the back of the lens if you hold it at an oblique angle with light reflecting off the surface.

Billiam29 Senior Member • Posts: 1,834
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
1

Sean Nelson wrote:

Billiam29 wrote:

I’m not sure what you’re considering the “front” surface, but anti-reflective coating only needs to be applied to the interior surface of eyeglass lenses. The surface facing your eyes. For eyeglasses there’s really no functional purpose to having it applied to the “exterior” surface that faces away from your eyes.

All true, but you can see the colour tint from either the front or the back of the lens if you hold it at an oblique angle with light reflecting off the surface.

It may very well just come down to the practicalities of how a particular anti-reflective coating is applied. If it’s applied via a vapor deposition process it’s probably much easier to just have the lenses in open space on a fixture and let the coatings be applied on all surfaces.

I honestly don’t remember what I chose for the glasses I’m currently wearing. I definitely do remember the optician mentioning anti-reflective and scratch-resistant coatings specifically on the interior and exterior for at least some of the options we talked about. The possibilities may have involved the lens substrate material or what combinations of options would be covered under warranty. I just remember I went with Zeiss lenses.

Batdude
OP Batdude Veteran Member • Posts: 4,977
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Billiam29 wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Billiam29 wrote:

I’m not sure what you’re considering the “front” surface, but anti-reflective coating only needs to be applied to the interior surface of eyeglass lenses. The surface facing your eyes. For eyeglasses there’s really no functional purpose to having it applied to the “exterior” surface that faces away from your eyes.

All true, but you can see the colour tint from either the front or the back of the lens if you hold it at an oblique angle with light reflecting off the surface.

It may very well just come down to the practicalities of how a particular anti-reflective coating is applied. If it’s applied via a vapor deposition process it’s probably much easier to just have the lenses in open space on a fixture and let the coatings be applied on all surfaces.

I just got off the phone with them and you are right it also depends who their vendor is, the ones that apply it on.  They just told me that for editing photos it might not work for me and they don’t recommend them.  I’m fine with that and I don’t think is a big deal and I’m sure the new monitor will be much better than the 24” 1080p I had  👍

I honestly don’t remember what I chose for the glasses I’m currently wearing. I definitely do remember the optician mentioning anti-reflective and scratch-resistant coatings specifically on the interior and exterior for at least some of the options we talked about. The possibilities may have involved the lens substrate material or what combinations of options would be covered under warranty. I just remember I went with Zeiss lenses.

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Tom_N Forum Pro • Posts: 18,522
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
1

Batdude wrote:

I got my new computer screen glasses prescription today and I was asked if I wanted to pay extra for that type of coating. I don’t know anything about this coating and I’m not sure if is a gimmick. Is it not and should I get that on my glasses? Do any of you have it?

When I got my glasses, the store offered that to me. I ordered their "best" progressive lenses otherwise, but told them that I did not want that particular feature.

It took a couple of times of me saying something like "But wouldn't that filter out some of the blue from photos, too?" and the guy reassuring me that it wouldn't interfere with vision, before he got the point.  Then he said that you might not want the feature if you were editing photos on a computer screen.

As far as it being a gimmick (for non-photo-editing use), I don't know whether it is or not. A WebMD article says that "there’s not a lot of research to show [whether it works]."

https://www.webmd.com/eye-health/news/20191216/do-blue-light-glasses-work

sludge21017
sludge21017 Senior Member • Posts: 2,660
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Batdude wrote:

I got my new computer screen glasses prescription today and I was asked if I wanted to pay extra for that type of coating. I don’t know anything about this coating and I’m not sure if is a gimmick. Is it not and should I get that on my glasses? Do any of you have it?

What they did told me is that the glasses do have some kind of “purple looking tint” and as soon as they said that I told them I would get back to them on that because if I’m PP photos in Lightroom how is that purple looking tint going to affect my workflow? Am I going to run into issues because I’ll be seeing weird colors on the monitor??

Will appreciate more info from folks that have or are using these type of coating.

Yes, I got them, I thought I wouldn't like them for computer use, but I don't even really notice.

I do notice a slight yellow look when in fluorescent lighting (cool white), like in a brightly lit restroom.

With white on a computer, a little bit.

Supposedly when they are blue reflecting - they are "working".

There is a big difference with windows blue light filter and the lenses. It's not the same visual effect. I still use the blue light blocker at night.

Well to be specific about my lenses and their technology used -read here and see if your company compares:

Everything to Know About Blue Light and Crizal Prevencia | CovalentCareers

And they confirm - not the same a windows blue light.

Robert Zanatta Senior Member • Posts: 2,012
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses
1

"Well, we've never done this before. But seeing as it's special circumstances and all, he says I can knock a hundred dollars off that Trucoat."

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Eric Carlson
Eric Carlson Veteran Member • Posts: 6,869
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

Batdude wrote:

Eric Carlson wrote:

Buy them at ZenniOptical. It's where we buy all our glasses. You can get a pair with blue filter for probably around $25, I'm guesstimating. It's probably cheaper than just the coating alone from your glasses store.

https://www.zennioptical.com/

Eric, thanks for the tip but it sounds like you didn’t read my post at all. I’m not asking where to buy them.

I read your post, but I gave you another option in case you wanted to save money. Sorry for that. I'll try to avoid that on your posts in the future.

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Wayne Larmon Forum Pro • Posts: 10,614
What the spectrum of monitors really looks like

sludge21017 wrote:

There is a big difference with windows blue light filter and the lenses. It's not the same visual effect. I still use the blue light blocker at night.

Well to be specific about my lenses and their technology used -read here and see if your company compares:

Everything to Know About Blue Light and Crizal Prevencia | CovalentCareers

And they confirm - not the same a windows blue light.

This link is possibly misleading. They show LED light with a spectrum of

Which is representative of 5000K LED bulbs. But LED bulbs aren't screens. This is how my NEC PA241W monitor measured (when displaying pure white):

There is a lot of hand waving about light qualities without measurements to back up the claims. Making spectrometer measurements isn't that difficult or expensive.

Costs about the price of a halfway decent lens.

[Edit.  I did the measurement of my PA241W several years ago.  I set up ColorMeter just now and remeasured.  The PA241W looked about the same.  But the PA241W is an exotic wide-gamut monitor with internal calibration hardware.  I measured several non-exotic monitors and they *did* have a prominent peak in the blue.  So maybe it is only exotic wide-gamut monitors that don't have blue spikes.

But it is still valuable to be able to measure spectrums.]

Wayne

Holger Bargen Veteran Member • Posts: 4,372
Re: Blue Light Anti Reflective Coating Glasses

RDKirk wrote:

Batdude wrote:

I got my new computer screen glasses prescription today and I was asked if I wanted to pay extra for that type of coating. I don’t know anything about this coating and I’m not sure if is a gimmick. Is it not and should I get that on my glasses? Do any of you have it?

What they did told me is that the glasses do have some kind of “purple looking tint” and as soon as they said that I told them I would get back to them on that because if I’m PP photos in Lightroom how is that purple looking tint going to affect my workflow? Am I going to run into issues because I’ll be seeing weird colors on the monitor??

Will appreciate more info from folks that have or are using these type of coating.

Some blue-light filtering lenses are just mild amber tints that will affect your edit vision. Some more expensive lenses use a more sophisticated wave-lenth cut off filter that I believe does look purple-tinted when viewed at certain angles.

There is some evidence that late night staring into the blue light from typical daylight balanced LEDs delays melatonin production and thus can throw off a person's sleep cycle.

Claims that LED screens cause any kind of actual eye damage have not been verified by any real data.

If I don't work at photos I have my night mode windows 10 offers set ON. This reduces blue light and gives the view a yellowish touch.

The problem of blue light seems not to be a destruction of eyes but missadjustment of your inner watch. The bright light with lots of blue parts tells your body that it is something around noon. If you get this signal in the evening you will run into problems with your sleep. For this reason it is useful to adjust colour of your screen towards more sunset related spectrum.

However, damage of eyes by blue light is under discussion.

Here is a paper that says there is no risk at all:

https://www.nature.com/articles/eye2015261/

Being a Nature article it has high scientific impact.

Other scientist found some problems that are caused by blue light.

https://www.jbc.org/content/280/22/21061.full.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4734149/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1600-0420.2005.00627.x

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0753332220307708

The last of these papers also has some rating of techniques to reduce the effect of blue light one eyes.

If you know that you can sanitize for bacteria by illumination with blue LED we get a little insight that there could be a problem also for human eyes.

Cells under stress of blue light produce free radicals with high oxidative power. You may protect yourself by food with high antioxidant capacity or even dieatry supplements.

The power of light is reduced by the square of distance. For this reason I see problems especially with light sources that are close to the eye. You may guess what I am thinking about ...

Best regards

Holger

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Mark H
Mark H Veteran Member • Posts: 3,814
Re: Anti Reflective Coating...

Billiam29 wrote:

I’m not sure what you’re considering the “front” surface, but anti-reflective coating only needs to be applied to the interior surface of eyeglass lenses. The surface facing your eyes. For eyeglasses there’s really no functional purpose to having it applied to the “exterior” surface that faces away from your eyes.

No.

The purpose of having anti-reflective coating on the front surface is to reduce the reflectivity of the spectacles to observers looking at the wearer.

For example, high refractive index materials (which enable thinner lenses) are increasingly 'reflective' - so this becomes a significant and undesirable issue.

So AR coating is partly about vision - and also, partly about 'appearance'.

Mark H
Mark H Veteran Member • Posts: 3,814
Inverse-square law; doesn't really apply...

Holger Bargen wrote:

...The power of light is reduced by the square of distance. For this reason I see problems especially with light sources that are close to the eye. You may guess what I am thinking about ...

The 'inverse-square law' only really applies to point source illumination.

A typical display/screen - viewed at normal distance(s) - is very different.

However - there probably is some effect relationship corresponding to how much of the field of vision is occupied by the screen - which would be a function of the screen size and the viewing distance.

Billiam29 Senior Member • Posts: 1,834
Re: Anti Reflective Coating...

Mark H wrote:

Billiam29 wrote:

I’m not sure what you’re considering the “front” surface, but anti-reflective coating only needs to be applied to the interior surface of eyeglass lenses. The surface facing your eyes. For eyeglasses there’s really no functional purpose to having it applied to the “exterior” surface that faces away from your eyes.

No.

The purpose of having anti-reflective coating on the front surface is to reduce the reflectivity of the spectacles to observers looking at the wearer.

For example, high refractive index materials (which enable thinner lenses) are increasingly 'reflective' - so this becomes a significant and undesirable issue.

So AR coating is partly about vision - and also, partly about 'appearance'.

I see your point and I definitely think it’s valid as appearance certainly is a large part of the overall eyeglass sales experience. To elaborate on my own perspective though, the appearance of eyeglasses to those that are not wearing the glasses isn’t a function of the anti-reflective coating. It’s a cosmetic side benefit. From my perspective keeping light from the extreme periphery and rearwards of the lenses from reflecting into the wearer’s eyes is the core functional purpose if anti-reflective coatings.

Now having said that, people commonly seem to spend absurd amounts of money for frames they think look nice while cheaping-out on the actual part of the glasses they look through with their eyeballs. So if anti-reflective coatings on both lens surfaces are pitched to make you “look nicer” that’s fine, but that’s marketing. From my perspective that line of reasoning would be somewhat analogous to saying the nice looking expensive frames are changing the functionality of what the eyeglass frames are for, which they don’t. They just look nicer.

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