Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
tugatomsk
tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

Hi, everyone!

I've always enjoyed street photography, or rather, travel photography, the one that demands being able to take shots from a variety of things whether they're close or far away. I also like a camera with good ISO performance because travel shooting at night can be a challenge without a full-frame camera. However, since I can't afford full-frame cameras, I'll have to settle for APS-C or smaller.

My Canon 60D, despite its age, has good enough ISO performance. The EF-S 17-85mm lens performs fairly good, except at the wide-angle where it's rather poor. I borrowed a Canon EF 70-300mm for a year. It was bulky, heavy and the image stabilization never quite really worked for me, including messing some of my shots. The focusing mechanism was slow and noisy. In the end, I was not really that sorry about returning it. The image sharpness was quite good, though.

However, over the years, I grew tired of its bulkiness. The advent of smaller and ever more sofisticated mirrorless cameras only made things worse for me..

Another point against the 60D is its 720p50 video quality and the lack of 1080p60, as well as the contrast only AF. I'm VERY tired of having manually focus while shooting video...

I also hate changing lenses while traveling, especially when I'm with my family. That's where the Sony RX10 IV. Even though it has a smaller sensor, I've read and seen pictures that showed how remarkably good that sensor is given its size; the Zeiss lens quality and sharpness across the zoom range are also impressive. Yet I still worry about the high ISO with that Sony... How good is the image stabilization on the Sony (so that I could keep ISO as low as possible)?

The 24-600mm (FF equivalent) focal range of the Sony is also one of the main attractions to me. Incidentally, I borrowed a Nikon P900 for a few months. Its phenomenal range was marvellous to me. The image quality was surprising good considering the 1/2,3" sensor, but it still wasn't all that great. Finally, the inability to shoot RAW, the lack of on-sensor phase-detection AF, the relatively poor ISO quality and subpar auto-focus at maximum zoom kinda ruined the whole experience for me.

Then today I came across the Olympus E-M5 III with its impressive 7,5 IBIS + OIS stabilization. I also really liked the small-sized body and the many ergonomic controls. It'd be a dual-lens system, I know, but at least the primary lens (the 14-150mm) would be able to cover a great zoom range nonetheless.

I did some research and the combo lenses that have a similar 24-600mm range (as well as a similar price point) are the Zuiko 14-150mm F4-5.6 II and the Zuiko 75-300mm 1:4.8-6.7. I read that the 75-300mm sharpness is not so impressive compared to the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 100-300mm F4-5.6 II Power OIS, not to mention it's not as fast. I wonder if the Olympus IBIS alone will provide the 7 stops (IBIS only) when using that Panasonic lens? Or should I just stick with the Zuiko 75-300mm?

In the end, the final question is: should I get the Sony RX 10 IV (or even wait for a future mark V) or the Olympus with the aforementioned lenses? Are the new generation of Micro 4/3 sensors a match for the Canon 60D's old 18MP APS-C sensor?

Thanks in advance.

- tugatomsk

 tugatomsk's gear list:tugatomsk's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
KCook
KCook Forum Pro • Posts: 18,884
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo
1

Are the new generation of Micro 4/3 sensors a match for the Canon 60D's old 18MP APS-C sensor?

Yes.  I shoot with both an old Canon DSLR and newish M4/3.

Kelly Cook

 KCook's gear list:KCook's gear list
Canon EOS 50D Olympus PEN E-P5 Panasonic G85
Anders_K Contributing Member • Posts: 879
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

Try the Oly and get a wide angle prime lense too; for indoors, streets and landscapes.

IMO there 2 major use cases for zoom lenses
1) moderate zoom for image composition to avoid cropping in post-processing
2) long zoom for wildlife and fun shots

What is your use case?

The Lamentable Lens Contributing Member • Posts: 515
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo
1

tugatomsk wrote:

Then today I came across the Olympus E-M5 III with its impressive 7,5 IBIS + OIS stabilization.

I believe the 7.5-stop IBIS rating is for the E-M1, with Sync IS compatible lenses. The E-M5, I believe, is rated at 5.5 stops (6.5 with Sync IS compatible lenses, but I don't believe the lenses you're looking at are Sync IS compatible). That's still a lot of stabilization, but not quite as big a difference from the Sony, which is rated at 4.5 stops.

In any event, if you're willing to use an ILC, the sensor on the Olympus is considerably larger than the Sony, which may matter given your specific need for better low light performance. I have the em10, not the em5, but it's a great little camera, with some fun tricks up its sleeve. I'd lean heavily toward the Olympus for the larger sensor and the flexibility of interchangeable lenses, but a lot of this is personal preference.

 The Lamentable Lens's gear list:The Lamentable Lens's gear list
Ricoh GR III Olympus OM-D E-M10 III Sony a7R III Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +7 more
mostlyboringphotog Veteran Member • Posts: 9,345
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo
1

tugatomsk wrote:

Hi, everyone!

I've always enjoyed street photography, or rather, travel photography, the one that demands being able to take shots from a variety of things whether they're close or far away. I also like a camera with good ISO performance because travel shooting at night can be a challenge without a full-frame camera. However, since I can't afford full-frame cameras, I'll have to settle for APS-C or smaller.

My Canon 60D, despite its age, has good enough ISO performance. The EF-S 17-85mm lens performs fairly good, except at the wide-angle where it's rather poor. I borrowed a Canon EF 70-300mm for a year. It was bulky, heavy and the image stabilization never quite really worked for me, including messing some of my shots. The focusing mechanism was slow and noisy. In the end, I was not really that sorry about returning it. The image sharpness was quite good, though.

However, over the years, I grew tired of its bulkiness. The advent of smaller and ever more sofisticated mirrorless cameras only made things worse for me..

Another point against the 60D is its 720p50 video quality and the lack of 1080p60, as well as the contrast only AF. I'm VERY tired of having manually focus while shooting video...

I also hate changing lenses while traveling, especially when I'm with my family. That's where the Sony RX10 IV. Even though it has a smaller sensor, I've read and seen pictures that showed how remarkably good that sensor is given its size; the Zeiss lens quality and sharpness across the zoom range are also impressive. Yet I still worry about the high ISO with that Sony... How good is the image stabilization on the Sony (so that I could keep ISO as low as possible)?

The 24-600mm (FF equivalent) focal range of the Sony is also one of the main attractions to me. Incidentally, I borrowed a Nikon P900 for a few months. Its phenomenal range was marvellous to me. The image quality was surprising good considering the 1/2,3" sensor, but it still wasn't all that great. Finally, the inability to shoot RAW, the lack of on-sensor phase-detection AF, the relatively poor ISO quality and subpar auto-focus at maximum zoom kinda ruined the whole experience for me.

Then today I came across the Olympus E-M5 III with its impressive 7,5 IBIS + OIS stabilization. I also really liked the small-sized body and the many ergonomic controls. It'd be a dual-lens system, I know, but at least the primary lens (the 14-150mm) would be able to cover a great zoom range nonetheless.

I did some research and the combo lenses that have a similar 24-600mm range (as well as a similar price point) are the Zuiko 14-150mm F4-5.6 II and the Zuiko 75-300mm 1:4.8-6.7. I read that the 75-300mm sharpness is not so impressive compared to the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 100-300mm F4-5.6 II Power OIS, not to mention it's not as fast. I wonder if the Olympus IBIS alone will provide the 7 stops (IBIS only) when using that Panasonic lens? Or should I just stick with the Zuiko 75-300mm?

In the end, the final question is: should I get the Sony RX 10 IV (or even wait for a future mark V) or the Olympus with the aforementioned lenses? Are the new generation of Micro 4/3 sensors a match for the Canon 60D's old 18MP APS-C sensor?

Thanks in advance.

- tugatomsk

Just to get you to a tanget

sony cyber-shot dsc-rx10 iv $1,598.00

Canon EOS RP $899.00 RF 24-240mm $699.00 Total $1,598.00

And both weigh about the same.

You don't quite get the FOV of 600mm of RX10IV and substantially bulkier than EM5+14-150mm but you get FF sensor for same or not much more price.

Good luck...

BTW, IBIS/Image Stabilization only helps you for the static subjects.

 mostlyboringphotog's gear list:mostlyboringphotog's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Pentax 645Z Nikon 1 J5 Fujifilm GFX 50R Canon EOS RP
tugatomsk
OP tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

The Lamentable Lens wrote:

I believe the 7.5-stop IBIS rating is for the E-M1, with Sync IS compatible lenses. The E-M5, I believe, is rated at 5.5 stops (6.5 with Sync IS compatible lenses, but I don't believe the lenses you're looking at are Sync IS compatible). That's still a lot of stabilization, but not quite as big a difference from the Sony, which is rated at 4.5 stops.

I wasn't aware of that, what a shame... :/ The E-M1 is filled with cool features besides the amazing IBIS but it's also far more expensive.

How can I check which Olympus lenses work with Dual IS?

 tugatomsk's gear list:tugatomsk's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
tugatomsk
OP tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

Anders_K wrote:

Try the Oly and get a wide angle prime lense too; for indoors, streets and landscapes.

IMO there 2 major use cases for zoom lenses
1) moderate zoom for image composition to avoid cropping in post-processing
2) long zoom for wildlife and fun shots

What is your use case?

I would say the second case.

 tugatomsk's gear list:tugatomsk's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
The Lamentable Lens Contributing Member • Posts: 515
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

tugatomsk wrote:

The Lamentable Lens wrote:

I believe the 7.5-stop IBIS rating is for the E-M1, with Sync IS compatible lenses. The E-M5, I believe, is rated at 5.5 stops (6.5 with Sync IS compatible lenses, but I don't believe the lenses you're looking at are Sync IS compatible). That's still a lot of stabilization, but not quite as big a difference from the Sony, which is rated at 4.5 stops.

I wasn't aware of that, what a shame... :/ The E-M1 is filled with cool features besides the amazing IBIS but it's also far more expensive.

How can I check which Olympus lenses work with Dual IS?

Looks like like you can filter for lens stabilization here.  As of right now, it appears limited to three lenses, none of which sit at the more affordable end of m43 lenses:

1.  12-100 F/4 PRO ($1,300);

2.  100-400 f/5.0-6.3 ($1,500); and

3.  300 f/4 ($2,900).

 The Lamentable Lens's gear list:The Lamentable Lens's gear list
Ricoh GR III Olympus OM-D E-M10 III Sony a7R III Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +7 more
Anders_K Contributing Member • Posts: 879
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

tugatomsk wrote:

Anders_K wrote:

Try the Oly and get a wide angle prime lense too; for indoors, streets and landscapes.

IMO there 2 major use cases for zoom lenses
1) moderate zoom for image composition to avoid cropping in post-processing
2) long zoom for wildlife and fun shots

What is your use case?

I would say the second case.

This makes an easy decision.

Since large sensors require too heavy and expensive lenses, and small sensors suffer from noise, you are in the 1" or m4/3  sensor class.

The Sony RX10 IV is the best compromise, not perfect, but there it is, unless you are willing to reduce your zoom range, or lug around heavy gear.

BTW my personal compromise had been a Pansonic FZ2000 (admittedly I had been lucky to get a copy with real sharp lens) for half the price of an RX10 IV.

tugatomsk
OP tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo
1

The Lamentable Lens wrote:

tugatomsk wrote:

The Lamentable Lens wrote:

I believe the 7.5-stop IBIS rating is for the E-M1, with Sync IS compatible lenses. The E-M5, I believe, is rated at 5.5 stops (6.5 with Sync IS compatible lenses, but I don't believe the lenses you're looking at are Sync IS compatible). That's still a lot of stabilization, but not quite as big a difference from the Sony, which is rated at 4.5 stops.

I wasn't aware of that, what a shame... :/ The E-M1 is filled with cool features besides the amazing IBIS but it's also far more expensive.

How can I check which Olympus lenses work with Dual IS?

Looks like like you can filter for lens stabilization here. As of right now, it appears limited to three lenses, none of which sit at the more affordable end of m43 lenses:

1. 12-100 F/4 PRO ($1,300);

2. 100-400 f/5.0-6.3 ($1,500); and

3. 300 f/4 ($2,900).

Well... bugger. I can't afford any of those. I guess I could live without Dual IS, the stabilization stop numbers are still respectable, according to The Lamentable Lens, just not so great.

The remaining question is how much image quality would I lose with the 14-150 lens compared to the 12-100 PRO? I imagine quite a lot, but I'd like to know if it's still usable (like comparing to the likes of a Nikon DX 18-300mm).

It's a shame Olympus never designed the M4/3 counterpart to the Tamron 18-400mm or even the Tamron 16-300mm. I'd get it in a heartbeat.

 tugatomsk's gear list:tugatomsk's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
techie takes pics Senior Member • Posts: 1,194
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo
3

tugatomsk wrote:

The Lamentable Lens wrote:

tugatomsk wrote:

The Lamentable Lens wrote:

I believe the 7.5-stop IBIS rating is for the E-M1, with Sync IS compatible lenses. The E-M5, I believe, is rated at 5.5 stops (6.5 with Sync IS compatible lenses, but I don't believe the lenses you're looking at are Sync IS compatible). That's still a lot of stabilization, but not quite as big a difference from the Sony, which is rated at 4.5 stops.

I wasn't aware of that, what a shame... :/ The E-M1 is filled with cool features besides the amazing IBIS but it's also far more expensive.

How can I check which Olympus lenses work with Dual IS?

Looks like like you can filter for lens stabilization here. As of right now, it appears limited to three lenses, none of which sit at the more affordable end of m43 lenses:

1. 12-100 F/4 PRO ($1,300);

2. 100-400 f/5.0-6.3 ($1,500); and

3. 300 f/4 ($2,900).

Well... bugger. I can't afford any of those. I guess I could live without Dual IS, the stabilization stop numbers are still respectable, according to The Lamentable Lens, just not so great.

The remaining question is how much image quality would I lose with the 14-150 lens compared to the 12-100 PRO? I imagine quite a lot, but I'd like to know if it's still usable (like comparing to the likes of a Nikon DX 18-300mm).

It's a shame Olympus never designed the M4/3 counterpart to the Tamron 18-400mm or even the Tamron 16-300mm. I'd get it in a heartbeat.

I own an M5.III.  Yes, the IBIS works as advertised.

I respond to this particular post because I was going to recommend the same lens: 12-100 F4, over the 14-150.   The 14-150 is a consumer lens; the 12-100 is a pro lens.  
The 12-100 gets nothing but praise. The 14-150... ... thumbleweed ... ... crickets ... probably not a bad lens.

I respect that you hate changing lenses. My advice:

- Don't buy an interchangeable lens camera with one do-it-all lens.

- Either get the Sony (according to reviews, it really is that good). Or get the ILC with a very, very good lens like the 12-100. 
Do not try to replicate the Sony.

Personally I never want anything else than an ILC ever again.
Reason: No lens is perfect. Every lens is a tradeoff between price, zoomrange, weight, quality and aperture. 
With an ILC, I can optimize 2-3 of those 5 aspects while sacrificing on the others.
With a fixed lens camera, the producer has made that choice for me.

 techie takes pics's gear list:techie takes pics's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL1 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-M5 III Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm F2.8 OIS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro +4 more
tugatomsk
OP tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

techie takes pics wrote:

I own an M5.III. Yes, the IBIS works as advertised.

I respond to this particular post because I was going to recommend the same lens: 12-100 F4, over the 14-150. The 14-150 is a consumer lens; the 12-100 is a pro lens.
The 12-100 gets nothing but praise. The 14-150... ... thumbleweed ... ... crickets ... probably not a bad lens.

I respect that you hate changing lenses. My advice:

- Don't buy an interchangeable lens camera with one do-it-all lens.

- Either get the Sony (according to reviews, it really is that good). Or get the ILC with a very, very good lens like the 12-100.
Do not try to replicate the Sony.

Personally I never want anything else than an ILC ever again.
Reason: No lens is perfect. Every lens is a tradeoff between price, zoomrange, weight, quality and aperture.
With an ILC, I can optimize 2-3 of those 5 aspects while sacrificing on the others.
With a fixed lens camera, the producer has made that choice for me.

That is the million-dollar question: why pick an ILC if you're not ever going to change lenses anyway? That is the reason I've been scratching my head for so long while trying to make the best decision on how to spend my money on this hobby. Also, the thought of buying an expensive sensor just to stick a poor jack-of-all-trades lens only worsened my indecision.

I guess I'll most likely heed your advice and get the Sony. I still remember a user in this forum saying that his Sony RX10 IV lens "did some black magic" due to how good most of his pictures turned out. One thing I'll miss, though, is the ability to zoom while shooting, something that the Sony can't do. But, alas, there's no free lunch, right?

But this topic of mine also gave me more knowledge - from people who actually own the cameras - about the current technological status of sensor quality and image processing. Thank you all so much.

However, if I did have more money to spend, I'd probably do one of two things:

- Buy an Olympus E-M1 with the 12-100mm PRO lens and the 75-300mm for all occasions and "bear" the occasional need to change lenses;

- Buy a Fuji X-S10 with the new 16-80mm (and probably the 75-300mm) lens for my lonely photo shooting walks (which I plan beforehand the kind of photography I should be expecting) AND still buy the Sony for when I'm out with my family, either on holidays or for Sunday walks.

 tugatomsk's gear list:tugatomsk's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
evetsf Senior Member • Posts: 1,425
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo
1

tugatomsk wrote:

Hi, everyone!

I've always enjoyed street photography, or rather, travel photography, the one that demands being able to take shots from a variety of things whether they're close or far away. I also like a camera with good ISO performance because travel shooting at night can be a challenge without a full-frame camera. However, since I can't afford full-frame cameras, I'll have to settle for APS-C or smaller.

My Canon 60D, despite its age, has good enough ISO performance. The EF-S 17-85mm lens performs fairly good, except at the wide-angle where it's rather poor. I borrowed a Canon EF 70-300mm for a year. It was bulky, heavy and the image stabilization never quite really worked for me, including messing some of my shots. The focusing mechanism was slow and noisy. In the end, I was not really that sorry about returning it. The image sharpness was quite good, though.

However, over the years, I grew tired of its bulkiness. The advent of smaller and ever more sofisticated mirrorless cameras only made things worse for me..

Another point against the 60D is its 720p50 video quality and the lack of 1080p60, as well as the contrast only AF. I'm VERY tired of having manually focus while shooting video...

I also hate changing lenses while traveling, especially when I'm with my family. That's where the Sony RX10 IV. Even though it has a smaller sensor, I've read and seen pictures that showed how remarkably good that sensor is given its size; the Zeiss lens quality and sharpness across the zoom range are also impressive. Yet I still worry about the high ISO with that Sony... How good is the image stabilization on the Sony (so that I could keep ISO as low as possible)?

The 24-600mm (FF equivalent) focal range of the Sony is also one of the main attractions to me. Incidentally, I borrowed a Nikon P900 for a few months. Its phenomenal range was marvellous to me. The image quality was surprising good considering the 1/2,3" sensor, but it still wasn't all that great. Finally, the inability to shoot RAW, the lack of on-sensor phase-detection AF, the relatively poor ISO quality and subpar auto-focus at maximum zoom kinda ruined the whole experience for me.

Then today I came across the Olympus E-M5 III with its impressive 7,5 IBIS + OIS stabilization. I also really liked the small-sized body and the many ergonomic controls. It'd be a dual-lens system, I know, but at least the primary lens (the 14-150mm) would be able to cover a great zoom range nonetheless.

I did some research and the combo lenses that have a similar 24-600mm range (as well as a similar price point) are the Zuiko 14-150mm F4-5.6 II and the Zuiko 75-300mm 1:4.8-6.7. I read that the 75-300mm sharpness is not so impressive compared to the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 100-300mm F4-5.6 II Power OIS, not to mention it's not as fast. I wonder if the Olympus IBIS alone will provide the 7 stops (IBIS only) when using that Panasonic lens? Or should I just stick with the Zuiko 75-300mm?

In the end, the final question is: should I get the Sony RX 10 IV (or even wait for a future mark V) or the Olympus with the aforementioned lenses? Are the new generation of Micro 4/3 sensors a match for the Canon 60D's old 18MP APS-C sensor?

Thanks in advance.

- tugatomsk

Any reason you're ignoring the other big player in the M43 world: Panasonic?

Panasonic has a lot more IS lenses than Olympus, and all of their current bodies have IBIS and are Dual IS capable with IS lenses. Their video is pretty good too.

On the Panasonic side, you could go with the G90/95, either the 12-60 or 14-140 zoom plus the 100-300 you've already mentioned. All weather sealed & all Dual IS compatible.

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All rights reserved for any images in my Gallery or included in a message. Specific exceptions may be granted upon request.

 evetsf's gear list:evetsf's gear list
Fujifilm X-S1 Panasonic FZ2500 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F4 ASPH +3 more
techie takes pics Senior Member • Posts: 1,194
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

tugatomsk wrote:

techie takes pics wrote:

I own an M5.III. Yes, the IBIS works as advertised.

I respond to this particular post because I was going to recommend the same lens: 12-100 F4, over the 14-150. The 14-150 is a consumer lens; the 12-100 is a pro lens.
The 12-100 gets nothing but praise. The 14-150... ... thumbleweed ... ... crickets ... probably not a bad lens.

I respect that you hate changing lenses. My advice:

- Don't buy an interchangeable lens camera with one do-it-all lens.

- Either get the Sony (according to reviews, it really is that good). Or get the ILC with a very, very good lens like the 12-100.
Do not try to replicate the Sony.

Personally I never want anything else than an ILC ever again.
Reason: No lens is perfect. Every lens is a tradeoff between price, zoomrange, weight, quality and aperture.
With an ILC, I can optimize 2-3 of those 5 aspects while sacrificing on the others.
With a fixed lens camera, the producer has made that choice for me.

That is the million-dollar question: why pick an ILC if you're not ever going to change lenses anyway? That is the reason I've been scratching my head for so long while trying to make the best decision on how to spend my money on this hobby. Also, the thought of buying an expensive sensor just to stick a poor jack-of-all-trades lens only worsened my indecision.

I guess I'll most likely heed your advice and get the Sony. I still remember a user in this forum saying that his Sony RX10 IV lens "did some black magic" due to how good most of his pictures turned out. One thing I'll miss, though, is the ability to zoom while shooting, something that the Sony can't do. But, alas, there's no free lunch, right?

But this topic of mine also gave me more knowledge - from people who actually own the cameras - about the current technological status of sensor quality and image processing. Thank you all so much.

However, if I did have more money to spend, I'd probably do one of two things:

- Buy an Olympus E-M1 with the 12-100mm PRO lens and the 75-300mm for all occasions and "bear" the occasional need to change lenses;

- Buy a Fuji X-S10 with the new 16-80mm (and probably the 75-300mm) lens for my lonely photo shooting walks (which I plan beforehand the kind of photography I should be expecting) AND still buy the Sony for when I'm out with my family, either on holidays or for Sunday walks.

You may see changing lenses as a chore. Perhaps dangerous (you may drop them. Dust may get inside).

I see changing lenses as an opportunity to adjust my camera to the task at hand.

I also appreciate that lenses hold their value, and they stay with you when you upgrade your camera.

Owning a compact means I bin the entire system when just the camera needs an update - even though the lens is as good as the day I bought it.

Example: My 12-40 Pro lens came out in 2013.
It is as good and as recommended today as it was 7 years ago. It's still being made.
It's not surpassed or outdated.  Second hand price is 70% of the shop-price.  
Since then, there have been 4? 5? generations of cameras, most of which I would no longer recommend to anyone; and which hold little or no resale-value.

 techie takes pics's gear list:techie takes pics's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL1 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-M5 III Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm F2.8 OIS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro +4 more
tugatomsk
OP tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

evetsf wrote:

Any reason you're ignoring the other big player in the M43 world: Panasonic?

Panasonic has a lot more IS lenses than Olympus, and all of their current bodies have IBIS and are Dual IS capable with IS lenses. Their video is pretty good too.

On the Panasonic side, you could go with the G90/95, either the 12-60 or 14-140 zoom plus the 100-300 you've already mentioned. All weather sealed & all Dual IS compatible.

I have nothing against Panasonic, quite the contrary. They're one of the leaders in video performance and their photo equipment is a great value compared to almost all other photo brands.

However, there were a couple of reasons for not considering the Panasonic G90/95.

First, I thought the Panasonic rival of the Olympus was the G9, which is rather big (almost the size of my Canon 60D), which was a turn off for me, despite the LCD on the top plate and good ergonomy.

Secondly, the DFD autofocus is great for stills but not so great for video, and I do like to make amateur videos. The wobbly and inconsistent nature of DFD while filming is very distracting. Olympus' phase-detection AF seems to work better for video.

With that said, I checked your suggestion and the G95 is the one I should have looked up from the start. Also, your info regarding the many more Panasonic lenses able to use DUAL IS is very attractive. I'll keep that in mind. Althoguh it's a bit of a shame the G95 doesn't have the High-Resolution mode (only the G9 has it) like the Olympus E-M5 III and the E-M1 III.

EDIT: Does the Panasonic 14-140 also work with the G95 DUAL IS?

 tugatomsk's gear list:tugatomsk's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
evetsf Senior Member • Posts: 1,425
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

tugatomsk wrote:

evetsf wrote:

Any reason you're ignoring the other big player in the M43 world: Panasonic?

Panasonic has a lot more IS lenses than Olympus, and all of their current bodies have IBIS and are Dual IS capable with IS lenses. Their video is pretty good too.

On the Panasonic side, you could go with the G90/95, either the 12-60 or 14-140 zoom plus the 100-300 you've already mentioned. All weather sealed & all Dual IS compatible.

I have nothing against Panasonic, quite the contrary. They're one of the leaders in video performance and their photo equipment is a great value compared to almost all other photo brands.

However, there were a couple of reasons for not considering the Panasonic G90/95.

First, I thought the Panasonic rival of the Olympus was the G9, which is rather big (almost the size of my Canon 60D), which was a turn off for me, despite the LCD on the top plate and good ergonomy.

Secondly, the DFD autofocus is great for stills but not so great for video, and I do like to make amateur videos. The wobbly and inconsistent nature of DFD while filming is very distracting. Olympus' phase-detection AF seems to work better for video.

With that said, I checked your suggestion and the G95 is the one I should have looked up from the start. Also, your info regarding the many more Panasonic lenses able to use DUAL IS is very attractive. I'll keep that in mind. Althoguh it's a bit of a shame the G95 doesn't have the High-Resolution mode (only the G9 has it) like the Olympus E-M5 III and the E-M1 III.

EDIT: Does the Panasonic 14-140 also work with the G95 DUAL IS?

Yes, the 14-140 is Dual IS capable with the G90/95. Panasonic has two levels of lens IS: the earlier one is named MEGA O.I.S., and the latest is called POWER O.I.S.  Mega OIS is not as powerful as Power OIS, which is something to keep in mind if you shop used. The latest version of the 14-140 has model number H-FSA14140. It's optically identical to the earlier H-FS14140 but adds weather sealing.

As for the video autofocus, I don't have much to comment on there, as I don't do a lot of it. But I do believe there's a way to set things up where the touch screen can be used to switch focus from one point to another, and not try to continually focus in between, which is where the wobble shows up.

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Steve
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 evetsf's gear list:evetsf's gear list
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tugatomsk
OP tugatomsk New Member • Posts: 19
Re: Sony RX10 IV vs Olympus E-M5 III lens combo

evetsf wrote:

Yes, the 14-140 is Dual IS capable with the G90/95. Panasonic has two levels of lens IS: the earlier one is named MEGA O.I.S., and the latest is called POWER O.I.S. Mega OIS is not as powerful as Power OIS, which is something to keep in mind if you shop used. The latest version of the 14-140 has model number H-FSA14140. It's optically identical to the earlier H-FS14140 but adds weather sealing.

As for the video autofocus, I don't have much to comment on there, as I don't do a lot of it. But I do believe there's a way to set things up where the touch screen can be used to switch focus from one point to another, and not try to continually focus in between, which is where the wobble shows up.

Thanks. I'll keep that in mind.

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Canon EOS 60D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
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