NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
Ron Zamir Senior Member • Posts: 1,333
NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

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Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,629
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?
3

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

The big difference is when you go from hard drive to SSD.  There is an additional improvement in load time and responsiveness with a fast NVNM drive yet it's not huge.

Morris

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Chris Noble
Chris Noble Veteran Member • Posts: 3,551
NVME, then SATA
3

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

Does the Kingston mount on a motherboard NVME slot? In that case I'd choose it for your main (C:) drive.

You can keep the Samsung SATA drive as an internal cable plug-in D: drive.

Also, always good to have a spare SATA drive available in case you need to restore from backup in a hurry and the stores are closed. You can put it in a cheap USB enclosure.

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OP Ron Zamir Senior Member • Posts: 1,333
Re: NVME, then SATA

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

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Sean Nelson
Sean Nelson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,019
Re: NVME, then SATA

Ron Zamir wrote:

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

I built a system at the start of the year and I used the two M.2 slots on the motherboard.  It makes for a very nice clean and simple installation.   I guess the only downside would be in not being able to remove the drives and put them into an external enclosure for some sort of utility purpose, but I don't really foresee a need to do that.

johnnyandedgar Contributing Member • Posts: 514
Re: NVME, then SATA
2

"Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard."

Configure as a C:\ drive.

johnnyandedgar

Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,629
Re: NVME, then SATA

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

I built a system at the start of the year and I used the two M.2 slots on the motherboard. It makes for a very nice clean and simple installation. I guess the only downside would be in not being able to remove the drives and put them into an external enclosure for some sort of utility purpose, but I don't really foresee a need to do that.

There are lots of external cases for NVME drives. This is the first one that came up in a search

https://www.amazon.com/Acasis-Enclosures-Enclosure-Type-C-Samsung/dp/B07G96D4XF

Morris

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johnnyandedgar Contributing Member • Posts: 514
Re: NVME, then SATA

I use one for a 500 GB NVMe when upgraded to a 1 TB. Store FLAC files for a new notebook. Works great!

johnnyandedgar

Simon Garrett Veteran Member • Posts: 6,859
Re: NVME, then SATA

Morris0 wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

I built a system at the start of the year and I used the two M.2 slots on the motherboard. It makes for a very nice clean and simple installation. I guess the only downside would be in not being able to remove the drives and put them into an external enclosure for some sort of utility purpose, but I don't really foresee a need to do that.

There are lots of external cases for NVME drives. This is the first one that came up in a search

https://www.amazon.com/Acasis-Enclosures-Enclosure-Type-C-Samsung/dp/B07G96D4XF

Morris

Or, if you have a spare PCIe slot, you can get M.2 NVMe adaptors to plug into a PCIe slot for about $/£/€ 10-15.

I got this one on amazon.co.uk; I don't think that particular one is on amazon.com, but plenty of others: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B075TF6HFM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Simon

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Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,629
Re: NVME, then SATA
1

Simon Garrett wrote:

Morris0 wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

I built a system at the start of the year and I used the two M.2 slots on the motherboard. It makes for a very nice clean and simple installation. I guess the only downside would be in not being able to remove the drives and put them into an external enclosure for some sort of utility purpose, but I don't really foresee a need to do that.

There are lots of external cases for NVME drives. This is the first one that came up in a search

https://www.amazon.com/Acasis-Enclosures-Enclosure-Type-C-Samsung/dp/B07G96D4XF

Morris

Or, if you have a spare PCIe slot, you can get M.2 NVMe adaptors to plug into a PCIe slot for about $/£/€ 10-15.

I got this one on amazon.co.uk; I don't think that particular one is on amazon.com, but plenty of others: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B075TF6HFM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Only if your BIOS supports NVME

Morris

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OP Ron Zamir Senior Member • Posts: 1,333
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

The thread went a bit out of my original post. I am aware of the technical aspects of installing internal and external SSD's.

My question is about the actual performance, under regular PC work, no gaming. Will there be BIG difference, in terms of speed and reliability in the "real world", between installed SATA 2'5 SSD and installed NVME SSD?

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Simon Garrett Veteran Member • Posts: 6,859
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?
1

Morris0 wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

The big difference is when you go from hard drive to SSD. There is an additional improvement in load time and responsiveness with a fast NVNM drive yet it's not huge.

Morris

The throughput of M.2 NVMe SSDs can be much faster than SATA SSDs.  SATA maxes out at 6GB/s, but M.2 NVMe can reach approaching 40GB/s (potentially double for PCIe 4.0).  I can measure that sort of difference between SATA and NVMe SSDs I have.

Although 5 times the disk throughput would be pretty unlikely to make any program run 5 times as fast, on my machines, Lightroom is significantly faster with M.2 SSDs.

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Simon

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Simon Garrett Veteran Member • Posts: 6,859
Re: NVME, then SATA

Morris0 wrote:

Simon Garrett wrote:

Morris0 wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

I built a system at the start of the year and I used the two M.2 slots on the motherboard. It makes for a very nice clean and simple installation. I guess the only downside would be in not being able to remove the drives and put them into an external enclosure for some sort of utility purpose, but I don't really foresee a need to do that.

There are lots of external cases for NVME drives. This is the first one that came up in a search

https://www.amazon.com/Acasis-Enclosures-Enclosure-Type-C-Samsung/dp/B07G96D4XF

Morris

Or, if you have a spare PCIe slot, you can get M.2 NVMe adaptors to plug into a PCIe slot for about $/£/€ 10-15.

I got this one on amazon.co.uk; I don't think that particular one is on amazon.com, but plenty of others: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B075TF6HFM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Only if your BIOS supports NVME

Morris

I thought it needed BIOS support only to boot from an NVMe drive, but to use it as a non-system drive then a motherboard with PCIe needs only NVMe drivers to access it. Or is that not correct?

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Simon

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PHXAZCRAIG
PHXAZCRAIG Forum Pro • Posts: 17,060
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?
2

Ron Zamir wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

The thread went a bit out of my original post. I am aware of the technical aspects of installing internal and external SSD's.

My question is about the actual performance, under regular PC work, no gaming. Will there be BIG difference, in terms of speed and reliability in the "real world", between installed SATA 2'5 SSD and installed NVME SSD?

Short answer: no

The difference will be noticeable in some areas, but basically you're talking the difference between fast and really fast.

That said, I have set up my PC's with an SSD (NVME) boot drive, and a second, working SSD drive.   I've got an older one with a SATA SSD as a working drive, and newer one with NMVE.    I don't really notice a difference, though the newer PC is a bit faster overall than the older one anyway.  I don't do back-to-back comparisons as the new one replaced the older one, and the older one sits as a spare.

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"In theory, practice and theory are the same. In practice, they're not."

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Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,629
Re: NVME, then SATA

Simon Garrett wrote:

Morris0 wrote:

Simon Garrett wrote:

Morris0 wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Yes, the NVME would go on the motherboard.

I built a system at the start of the year and I used the two M.2 slots on the motherboard. It makes for a very nice clean and simple installation. I guess the only downside would be in not being able to remove the drives and put them into an external enclosure for some sort of utility purpose, but I don't really foresee a need to do that.

There are lots of external cases for NVME drives. This is the first one that came up in a search

https://www.amazon.com/Acasis-Enclosures-Enclosure-Type-C-Samsung/dp/B07G96D4XF

Morris

Or, if you have a spare PCIe slot, you can get M.2 NVMe adaptors to plug into a PCIe slot for about $/£/€ 10-15.

I got this one on amazon.co.uk; I don't think that particular one is on amazon.com, but plenty of others: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B075TF6HFM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Only if your BIOS supports NVME

Morris

I thought it needed BIOS support only to boot from an NVMe drive, but to use it as a non-system drive then a motherboard with PCIe needs only NVMe drivers to access it. Or is that not correct?

Boot, always needs NVME support in BIOS.  No NVME BIOS support is something I have not tried.  When I researched this log ago I did not get a clear answer.

Morris

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Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,629
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?
2

Simon Garrett wrote:

Morris0 wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

The big difference is when you go from hard drive to SSD. There is an additional improvement in load time and responsiveness with a fast NVNM drive yet it's not huge.

Morris

The throughput of M.2 NVMe SSDs can be much faster than SATA SSDs. SATA maxes out at 6GB/s, but M.2 NVMe can reach approaching 40GB/s (potentially double for PCIe 4.0). I can measure that sort of difference between SATA and NVMe SSDs I have.

Although 5 times the disk throughput would be pretty unlikely to make any program run 5 times as fast, on my machines, Lightroom is significantly faster with M.2 SSDs.

Judge with your own eyes.  There are many more video's and reviews that show the small difference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3AMz-xZ2VM

Morris

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johnnyandedgar Contributing Member • Posts: 514
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?
1

"My question is about the actual performance, under regular PC work, no gaming. Will there be BIG difference, in terms of speed and reliability in the "real world", between installed SATA 2'5 SSD and installed NVME SSD?"

I have used NVME SSD's now for two years without issue. They  do provide a performance

increase.

johnnyandedgar

Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,629
Re: NVME SSD or SATA 2,5 for PC build?
2

johnnyandedgar wrote:

"My question is about the actual performance, under regular PC work, no gaming. Will there be BIG difference, in terms of speed and reliability in the "real world", between installed SATA 2'5 SSD and installed NVME SSD?"

I have used NVME SSD's now for two years without issue. They do provide a performance

increase.

johnnyandedgar

Judge with your own eyes. There are many more video's and reviews that show the small difference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3AMz-xZ2VM

Morris

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edispics
edispics Veteran Member • Posts: 4,400
Yup, here's a comparison for lightroom
1

Morris0 wrote:

johnnyandedgar wrote:

"My question is about the actual performance, under regular PC work, no gaming. Will there be BIG difference, in terms of speed and reliability in the "real world", between installed SATA 2'5 SSD and installed NVME SSD?"

I have used NVME SSD's now for two years without issue. They do provide a performance

increase.

johnnyandedgar

Judge with your own eyes. There are many more video's and reviews that show the small difference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3AMz-xZ2VM

Morris

That's consistent with what Puget found in their benchmarks:

Conclusion

For most of the tasks we tested, there was minimal difference between having your Lightroom files on a single platter drive versus a SSD, NVMe, or even spread across multiple drives. There was a number of times where one configuration or another was a few percent faster, but there were only two instances where the performance difference was large and consistent enough for us to draw any meaning from:

Convert RAW to DNG

Export to JPEG

For these tasks, we found that it was important to have the catalog, previews, and camera RAW cache located on an SSD. Whether the source images themselves were on an SSD or a platter drive did not appear to make all that much of a difference, but having the catalog, preview, and cache files on an SSD allowed us to convert RAW images to DNG about 2% faster and export images about 7-8% faster. Upgrading to an even faster NVMe did not further improve performance very much, however.

2% is not a very big difference, and even the 7-8% improvement we saw when exporting may not be a big deal if you already group your exports to run overnight or during lunch breaks. However, if you are looking to get the best performance possible out of Lightroom it is a good idea to keep all your catalog files (which by default is the same location for the previews) and your camera RAW cache on an SSD if possible.

The detailed benchmark results are here:

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Lightroom-2015-8-Storage-Performance-Analysis-875/

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edispics
edispics Veteran Member • Posts: 4,400
Careful with the b and the B
1

Simon Garrett wrote:

Morris0 wrote:

Ron Zamir wrote:

Hi. Just a beginner question - My first ever build PC based on AMMD Ryzen 2400G on an Asrock B450 motherboard. I have collected most of the parts but case. I bought the Samaung Evo 860 2,5 Sata SSD. This PC is not for gaming just office and Photoshop and some basic video editing. Saw some review, very impressed with the Kingston A2000. Does it make sense to sell the Samsung SSD and get the Kingston or other NVME SSD? Will I notice any improvement, speed difference and reliability?

The big difference is when you go from hard drive to SSD. There is an additional improvement in load time and responsiveness with a fast NVNM drive yet it's not huge.

Morris

The throughput of M.2 NVMe SSDs can be much faster than SATA SSDs. SATA maxes out at 6GB/s,

Nope, 6Gb as in bits, not B as in bytes per second

SATA I (revision 1.x) interface, formally known as SATA 1.5Gb/s, is the first generation SATA interface running at 1.5 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 150MB/s.

SATA II (revision 2.x) interface, formally known as SATA 3Gb/s, is a second generation SATA interface running at 3.0 Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 300MB/s.

SATA III (revision 3.x) interface, formally known as SATA 6Gb/s, is a third generation SATA interface running at 6.0Gb/s. The bandwidth throughput, which is supported by the interface, is up to 600MB/s. This interface is backwards compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s interface.

but M.2 NVMe can reach approaching 40GB/s (potentially double for PCIe 4.0). I can measure that sort of difference between SATA and NVMe SSDs I have.

A typical Samsung 970 Evo PCIe NVMe is rated at 3500 MB per second sequential read and 3300 MB per second sequential write.

Although 5 times the disk throughput would be pretty unlikely to make any program run 5 times as fast, on my machines, Lightroom is significantly faster with M.2 SSDs.

M.2 is just a design factor and can support PCIe or SATA or even USB. I supposed you mean with M.2 PCIe NVMe SSDs. But even then that statement is not consistent with Puget's testing, I have posted their benchmark results for Lightroom below.

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