A pirate

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DAP MV
DAP MV Contributing Member • Posts: 635
A pirate
2

I was not sure whether I should post this picture or not: after all, it's just another spider... But there are two interesting things about it, so I finally decided to post it. You can always ignore it.

This is a small spider genus Mimetus.

1. Look at the hairy legs! Those are sensors. You most likely won't see them even if you see the spider yourself, since the whole animal (including legs) is smaller than a bee.

2. Mimetus' common name is pirate spider, because it attacks (and, if it succeeds, eats) other spiders in their webs. This one is caught in the act: it's sitting at the edge of the web of a silver spider waiting for an opportunity to strike.

I know that a picture of a lion stalking an antelope would be more dramatic, but one has to content himself with what he's got... Neither lions, nor antelopes live in the Bay Area.

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Darius

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Bassy Forum Pro • Posts: 10,908
Re: A pirate

i like the little things in life      having said that 6 weeks ago i got bit by a spider on my ankle

it ended up being a very nasty bite about a 1 inch circle,im ok now  next time i will put on my boots   and not my walking shoes when im in that area again

DAP MV
OP DAP MV Contributing Member • Posts: 635
Re: A pirate

Bassy wrote:

i like the little things in life having said that 6 weeks ago i got bit by a spider on my ankle

it ended up being a very nasty bite about a 1 inch circle,im ok now next time i will put on my boots and not my walking shoes when im in that area again

Are you sure that it was a spider that bit you?

1. It is almost impossible to tell a spider bite from an insect bite--unless you see the spider biting you and know that it was really the spider.

2. Most of the spider bites are not medically significant. More on, most of the spiders have fangs that are too small to successfully penetrate human skin.

3. Spiders, when they bite in self defense, usually deliver so called dry bites, i.e., they don't inject venom (at least during first bites, if they bite more than one time). Venom is too precious for a spider to waste. (No offense... )

4. In most cases the nasty side effects of a bite are caused not by venom, but by infection accompanying a bite.

Rick Vetter is a renown arachnologist specializing in spider bites. I suggest you look for some of his articles online. They are fun to read, and there are many things one can learn from them.

And, since this is a photo forum, here is a picture of a shamrock spider (my favorite!) biting me:

As you can tell, I am still alive. My hand didn't even swell. The spider also survived the bite.

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Darius

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Augustin Man
Augustin Man Forum Pro • Posts: 10,672
Re: A pirate

Thank you very much, Darius my friend, for sharing another excellent spider image and a fascinating story along it!

The insect world is infinitely more dramatic than the animal world; if I'm not mistaken, the great French entomologist Fabre said if a Mantis would be as big as a domestic cat, it would be the most frightening monster alive in the world!

Happy shooting and all the best,

Augustin

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