Camera for Parents

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
amindu New Member • Posts: 7
Camera for Parents

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds.  We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models.  Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels.  This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year.  Price range looking to to stay around 5-600.  Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

Sony RX1 Sony RX100
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J Peters Contributing Member • Posts: 525
Re: Camera for Parents

Pounds or Dollars?

Please don't take this the wrong way. But my first feeling, if you have a 300 (Dollar?) camera and are getting blurry shots, then either you were in very poor lighting, or you're not using the right settings.

If the former then you could add light with continuous lighting or flash, or you could spend an awful lot more on a new camera. Your camera already sound pretty good, but one of the things that separates the excellent ones from good ones is ability to take shots in low light.

If it's the latter then did you have the lens wide open and the ISO cranked up? Or at least use the Sports mode. If you are shooting in Full Auto mode the camera cannot know you are shooting a moving subject and it will prioritise image quality (slower shutter speeds).

Sorry if you know all this but this is a beginners forum so I'm treading a line between trying to help and insulting your experience You could save a lot of money if you haven't learned how to get the best out of the camera you already have. Moreover, a more expensive camera set on Full Auto (point and shoot) mode will make similar decisions and will likely give similar results.

TacticDesigns
TacticDesigns Veteran Member • Posts: 8,116
Re: Camera for Parents

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

IMHO . . . since you are asking, you really owe it to yourself to try out these cameras yourself.

Try a Nikon or Canon dSLR camera.

(I got into Nikon dSLR cameras a long time ago when mirrorless was just coming on the market. So it was one of the only games in town at the time. LOL. But then when my older daughter got into indoor sports, I realized that I couldn't get shots of her at her competitions with the compact cameras I had. That is when I started to appreciate the power and versatility of the dSLR ILC. I found a used f/2.8 zoom and tossed it on my Nikon dSLR. That camera was able to focus fast enough for me to get infocus shots of my daughter at gymnastics. And the faster f/2.8 lens meant less noise in the final image.)

Try the latest mirrorless ILC (MILC).

See if you like how they handle. And if you think it will be fast enough for you to get infocus shots.

And then compare them against the latest Sony and Canon 1" compact cameras.

And then compare it to the latest and greatest cellphone.

Cellphones, the images will look grainy if you take a really hard look at them. But for capturing memories, they are great! They are always there. But personally . . . I get a lot more keepers with my dSLR gear at sports competitions.

So. The question is.

How much do you want to spend? How big a camera are you willing to tote around. And how good do you want your pictures to be?

It is possible to get a cheap dSLR for when you want fast focusing and cleaner final images. That way, when you are in a difficult shooting situation you can get the shots. And then when you don't want to carry it around, then use your phone or a cheap compact camera.

That is what I usually do.

I take my Nikon D7000 with a superzoom on it on vacation. I won't shoot with it everyday. But a couple of days I'll tote it around to get some nice clean keepers. But the rest of the time I have my waterproof compact (Fujifilm XP80) in my pocket. But when I go to a sports competition, my D7000 can focus fast enough for me to get infocus shots. When light is really low, I have my f/2.8 zoom lenses that I can use.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

-- hide signature --
 TacticDesigns's gear list:TacticDesigns's gear list
Fujifilm XP80 Nikon D5100 Pentax Q Nikon D750 Pentax *ist DS +9 more
MinAZ
MinAZ Veteran Member • Posts: 5,653
Re: Camera for Parents

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

Hi, if your images are blurry, you need to use flash or find more light, generally speaking. The RX100 series are great cameras if you learn to use them right, but they won't immediately solve this problem unless you also learn the proper technique for shooting fast moving objects in low light.

BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 3,646
Kodak, Lumix, Fuji, Olympus . . .

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

I am a NIKON user since 1961, still own Nikon F, Nikomat, Nikkor SLR Lenses.
Acquired Nikon D90 DSLR in 2005,  currently using 2 intermediate DX DSLRand 2 Pro-level FX DSLR.
.
Had owned and used Canon, Leica, MInolta, Yashica, Pentax, Retina & many others brands and lenses. 
.

Forget about the big name brands and the following:
_ interchangeable lenses
_ video capability
_ external flash
Your intended used does not require all those gizmos.
The $130 Lumix P&S I gave my brother-in-law in 2004 is working beautifully for him.  The $140 Olympus P&S gave my nephew for his graduation gift in 2006 is turning out great photo of  family gatherings.  The $99 Kodak P&S my wife bought in 2010 had produce clear, sharp,and perfectly exposed at fully automatic setting for her.

Bob
Bob Senior Member • Posts: 2,815
Re: Camera for Parents
1

Any Nikon D3000 or D5000 series would be cheap and ready to grab fleeting moments. The 18-55mm lens will be good for any family-type situation. If you have budget, get the Nikon SB-300 speed light. Bounce this off the ceiling for beautiful and evenly lit photos.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/dslr-cameras/1590/d3500.html

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/flashes/sb-300-af-speedlight.html

or for slightly more versatility

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/flashes/sb-500-af-speedlight.html

I don't like mirrorless cameras because they eat batteries.

Tenganis Regular Member • Posts: 111
Re: Camera for Parents

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

You could consider the a6000 with kit lens to start. You can get it pretty cheap nowadays. That’s what I started with to take pictures of my toddler. For fast moving toddlers consider using a really fast shutter speed. It’s made a huge difference in my pictures since I have been doing so.

 Tenganis's gear list:Tenganis's gear list
Sony a6000 Sony a6100 Sony E 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 PZ OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 16-55mm F2.8 G
lokatz
lokatz Senior Member • Posts: 2,230
Re: Camera for Parents
3

You are posting your question on a photo forum filled with enthusiasts who may be assuming you want to get deeper into photography over time. If that IS the case, getting a good "starter DSLR", such as a Nikon D3x00 or D5x00, may be good advice. The Sonys are also great if you know how to use them.

If, as your post suggests, ALL you are looking to do is to snap nice pics of your kid, I'd like to offer some contrarian advice: don't buy a camera at all. Use your smartphone, or get a better smartphone instead if your current one does not have a good enough camera.

Mind you, my heart bleeds when saying this because I am a passionate enthusiast who would NEVER use a smartphone unless I absolutely, absolutely had to. However, I am also a former electronics engineer who could not help but notice that if all you want to get are good pics and you are not in the least interested in the 'how', smartphones have become the superior answer.

For one, the phone is something you always have on you. An old photographers' adage is that "the best camera is always the one you have in your hands right now".

More importantly, smartphones have become amazingly good as cameras in what photographers call the 'standard range' of focal lengths. That's where most of your shooting will happen anyway. There are two reasons for this: a) modern smartphones have surprisingly good optics, as those technologies have progressed a great deal in recent years, and b), smartphones have MUCH more processing capability than any entry-to-mid-level camera does - they are simply more powerful computers. They use this processing capability to do a lot of wizardry on the images you shot, improving the lighting of a scene, reducing motion blur and noise, etc. Grainy pics, to which another poster referred, are a thing of the past with modern smartphones. Many folks who own dedicated cameras will deny this, but the fact of the matter is, it has become very hard to create a better image with a dedicated camera than with a good built-in smartphone camera. This is unless you are shooting subjects that smartphones don't really have the capability to shoot, such as ultra-wide-angle shots, for instance in real estate or architecture shooting, or tele shots in wildlife, birding, motor sports, or similar shooting. On the other hand, in poor lighting conditions, some smartphones now produce better pics than ANY dedicated camera does, at least unless you are willing to do a substantial amount of post-processing with images from the latter.

Family pics present no relevant limitations, so again, if you are not really interested in getting into photography more seriously, use a decent phone.

 lokatz's gear list:lokatz's gear list
Panasonic ZS100 Nikon D500 Nikon D850 Nikon Z7 II Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G +29 more
DeathArrow Senior Member • Posts: 3,387
Re: Camera for Parents

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

You can get an RX100 VA which is even better in low light than VI or VII, due it's brighter lens but it has a bit shorter zoom range.

That would be my recommendation.

 DeathArrow's gear list:DeathArrow's gear list
Sony RX100 VA Nikon D300 Nikon D610 Nikon D750 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D +6 more
DeathArrow Senior Member • Posts: 3,387
Re: Camera for Parents

TacticDesigns wrote:

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

IMHO . . . since you are asking, you really owe it to yourself to try out these cameras yourself.

Try a Nikon or Canon dSLR camera.

(I got into Nikon dSLR cameras a long time ago when mirrorless was just coming on the market. So it was one of the only games in town at the time. LOL. But then when my older daughter got into indoor sports, I realized that I couldn't get shots of her at her competitions with the compact cameras I had. That is when I started to appreciate the power and versatility of the dSLR ILC. I found a used f/2.8 zoom and tossed it on my Nikon dSLR. That camera was able to focus fast enough for me to get infocus shots of my daughter at gymnastics. And the faster f/2.8 lens meant less noise in the final image.)

Try the latest mirrorless ILC (MILC).

See if you like how they handle. And if you think it will be fast enough for you to get infocus shots.

And then compare them against the latest Sony and Canon 1" compact cameras.

And then compare it to the latest and greatest cellphone.

Cellphones, the images will look grainy if you take a really hard look at them. But for capturing memories, they are great! They are always there. But personally . . . I get a lot more keepers with my dSLR gear at sports competitions.

So. The question is.

How much do you want to spend? How big a camera are you willing to tote around. And how good do you want your pictures to be?

It is possible to get a cheap dSLR for when you want fast focusing and cleaner final images. That way, when you are in a difficult shooting situation you can get the shots. And then when you don't want to carry it around, then use your phone or a cheap compact camera.

That is what I usually do.

I take my Nikon D7000 with a superzoom on it on vacation. I won't shoot with it everyday. But a couple of days I'll tote it around to get some nice clean keepers. But the rest of the time I have my waterproof compact (Fujifilm XP80) in my pocket. But when I go to a sports competition, my D7000 can focus fast enough for me to get infocus shots. When light is really low, I have my f/2.8 zoom lenses that I can use.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

Him: I want a cheap but fast electric scooter. Xiaomi is kind of too expensive.

Me: I was a John Deer user since I was 11. By all means, buy an agricultural tractor or a combine harvester.

 DeathArrow's gear list:DeathArrow's gear list
Sony RX100 VA Nikon D300 Nikon D610 Nikon D750 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D +6 more
DeathArrow Senior Member • Posts: 3,387
Re: Camera for Parents

Tenganis wrote:

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

You could consider the a6000 with kit lens to start. You can get it pretty cheap nowadays. That’s what I started with to take pictures of my toddler. For fast moving toddlers consider using a really fast shutter speed. It’s made a huge difference in my pictures since I have been doing so.

I'd argue a Nikon D6 and 600mm f/4 or a Sony A9 and 600mm f/4 would be much better. You can capture the kids from 1 kilometer and have each frame in focus.

 DeathArrow's gear list:DeathArrow's gear list
Sony RX100 VA Nikon D300 Nikon D610 Nikon D750 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D +6 more
TacticDesigns
TacticDesigns Veteran Member • Posts: 8,116
Re: Camera for Parents

DeathArrow wrote:

TacticDesigns wrote:

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

IMHO . . . since you are asking, you really owe it to yourself to try out these cameras yourself.

Try a Nikon or Canon dSLR camera.

(I got into Nikon dSLR cameras a long time ago when mirrorless was just coming on the market. So it was one of the only games in town at the time. LOL. But then when my older daughter got into indoor sports, I realized that I couldn't get shots of her at her competitions with the compact cameras I had. That is when I started to appreciate the power and versatility of the dSLR ILC. I found a used f/2.8 zoom and tossed it on my Nikon dSLR. That camera was able to focus fast enough for me to get infocus shots of my daughter at gymnastics. And the faster f/2.8 lens meant less noise in the final image.)

Try the latest mirrorless ILC (MILC).

See if you like how they handle. And if you think it will be fast enough for you to get infocus shots.

And then compare them against the latest Sony and Canon 1" compact cameras.

And then compare it to the latest and greatest cellphone.

Cellphones, the images will look grainy if you take a really hard look at them. But for capturing memories, they are great! They are always there. But personally . . . I get a lot more keepers with my dSLR gear at sports competitions.

So. The question is.

How much do you want to spend? How big a camera are you willing to tote around. And how good do you want your pictures to be?

It is possible to get a cheap dSLR for when you want fast focusing and cleaner final images. That way, when you are in a difficult shooting situation you can get the shots. And then when you don't want to carry it around, then use your phone or a cheap compact camera.

That is what I usually do.

I take my Nikon D7000 with a superzoom on it on vacation. I won't shoot with it everyday. But a couple of days I'll tote it around to get some nice clean keepers. But the rest of the time I have my waterproof compact (Fujifilm XP80) in my pocket. But when I go to a sports competition, my D7000 can focus fast enough for me to get infocus shots. When light is really low, I have my f/2.8 zoom lenses that I can use.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

Him: I want a cheap but fast electric scooter. Xiaomi is kind of too expensive.

Me: I was a John Deer user since I was 11. By all means, buy an agricultural tractor or a combine harvester.

LOL.

Yes. You may do that.

Not me.

I am just pointing out different options for the OP and saying that I think they should try each option out. Or at least consider them.

Rather than just have a bunch of us saying . . . you should buy this, or you should buy that.

It is ultimately up to the OP to decide what will fit with what they want to do.

I was pointing out some options and pointing out some things to consider.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

-- hide signature --
 TacticDesigns's gear list:TacticDesigns's gear list
Fujifilm XP80 Nikon D5100 Pentax Q Nikon D750 Pentax *ist DS +9 more
Tenganis Regular Member • Posts: 111
Re: Camera for Parents

DeathArrow wrote:

Tenganis wrote:

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

You could consider the a6000 with kit lens to start. You can get it pretty cheap nowadays. That’s what I started with to take pictures of my toddler. For fast moving toddlers consider using a really fast shutter speed. It’s made a huge difference in my pictures since I have been doing so.

I'd argue a Nikon D6 and 600mm f/4 or a Sony A9 and 600mm f/4 would be much better. You can capture the kids from 1 kilometer and have each frame in focus.

I am confused by your response because I don’t think I said anything crazy? The a6000 with kit lens can be had for like $400 and is a good starter camera.

 Tenganis's gear list:Tenganis's gear list
Sony a6000 Sony a6100 Sony E 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 PZ OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 16-55mm F2.8 G
DeathArrow Senior Member • Posts: 3,387
Re: Camera for Parents

Tenganis wrote:

DeathArrow wrote:

Tenganis wrote:

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

You could consider the a6000 with kit lens to start. You can get it pretty cheap nowadays. That’s what I started with to take pictures of my toddler. For fast moving toddlers consider using a really fast shutter speed. It’s made a huge difference in my pictures since I have been doing so.

I'd argue a Nikon D6 and 600mm f/4 or a Sony A9 and 600mm f/4 would be much better. You can capture the kids from 1 kilometer and have each frame in focus.

I am confused by your response because I don’t think I said anything crazy? The a6000 with kit lens can be had for like $400 and is a good starter camera.

The op wants something small and cheap with good AF. He doesn't fancy an ILC.

 DeathArrow's gear list:DeathArrow's gear list
Sony RX100 VA Nikon D300 Nikon D610 Nikon D750 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D +6 more
Tenganis Regular Member • Posts: 111
Re: Camera for Parents

DeathArrow wrote:

Tenganis wrote:

DeathArrow wrote:

Tenganis wrote:

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

You could consider the a6000 with kit lens to start. You can get it pretty cheap nowadays. That’s what I started with to take pictures of my toddler. For fast moving toddlers consider using a really fast shutter speed. It’s made a huge difference in my pictures since I have been doing so.

I'd argue a Nikon D6 and 600mm f/4 or a Sony A9 and 600mm f/4 would be much better. You can capture the kids from 1 kilometer and have each frame in focus.

I am confused by your response because I don’t think I said anything crazy? The a6000 with kit lens can be had for like $400 and is a good starter camera.

The op wants something small and cheap with good AF. He doesn't fancy an ILC.

I missed the point and shoot part. You could have just said that.

 Tenganis's gear list:Tenganis's gear list
Sony a6000 Sony a6100 Sony E 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 PZ OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 16-55mm F2.8 G
JamesCurtis New Member • Posts: 2
Re: Camera for Parents

amindu wrote:

Hello All - we are in the market to purchase a point and shoot camera that would enable us to capture quick images of our toddler when she is doing something that only lasts seconds. We had her first birthday and I have a Sony midrange camera (300ish) that I had used however a lot of the pictures are blurry and out of focus.

I came across the RX100 like however the VI and VII are quite a price even open box models or like new models. Wondering what other models we could look at that we could use at home but also on travels. This camera would only really come out a handful of times a year. Price range looking to to stay around 5-600. Appreciate the suggestions thanks.

I can't talk about any other model of cameras, but I'm pretty sure that my model of camera which is Nikon Z5 won't suit you for such aims. It hasn't  built-in stabilization system and that's why it will be extremely difficult for you to make quick images.

OP amindu New Member • Posts: 7
Re: Camera for Parents

Thank you all for your comments to address a few questions.

$5-600 US dollars

i was using the camera in the P mode and the intelligent mode.

we were in our living room with the lights on as well as getting direct sunlight

the camera in use was a Sony HX50V

Will take a look at some of the smaller mirror less cameras however can you get away with just having one lens that will be sufficient 90-95% of the time versus having to carry around multiple lenses and at the same time be compact enough to actually take it places

OP amindu New Member • Posts: 7
Re: Camera for Parents

Thanks so based on the responses seems like consensus is to stay away from a point and shoot and go more of the traditional DSLR route.  I feel like during traveling and with a toddler it’s going to be quite hard to lug around a dslr versus a good midrange overall P&C to just have in your pocket and take it out as needed.  
Thanks BrownieVet for the reality check I had been focused on cameras that feature 4K videos since we do take quite a bit more videoes now vs in the past

OP amindu New Member • Posts: 7
Re: Camera for Parents

lokatz wrote:

You are posting your question on a photo forum filled with enthusiasts who may be assuming you want to get deeper into photography over time. If that IS the case, getting a good "starter DSLR", such as a Nikon D3x00 or D5x00, may be good advice. The Sonys are also great if you know how to use them.

If, as your post suggests, ALL you are looking to do is to snap nice pics of your kid, I'd like to offer some contrarian advice: don't buy a camera at all. Use your smartphone, or get a better smartphone instead if your current one does not have a good enough camera.

Mind you, my heart bleeds when saying this because I am a passionate enthusiast who would NEVER use a smartphone unless I absolutely, absolutely had to. However, I am also a former electronics engineer who could not help but notice that if all you want to get are good pics and you are not in the least interested in the 'how', smartphones have become the superior answer.

For one, the phone is something you always have on you. An old photographers' adage is that "the best camera is always the one you have in your hands right now".

More importantly, smartphones have become amazingly good as cameras in what photographers call the 'standard range' of focal lengths. That's where most of your shooting will happen anyway. There are two reasons for this: a) modern smartphones have surprisingly good optics, as those technologies have progressed a great deal in recent years, and b), smartphones have MUCH more processing capability than any entry-to-mid-level camera does - they are simply more powerful computers. They use this processing capability to do a lot of wizardry on the images you shot, improving the lighting of a scene, reducing motion blur and noise, etc. Grainy pics, to which another poster referred, are a thing of the past with modern smartphones. Many folks who own dedicated cameras will deny this, but the fact of the matter is, it has become very hard to create a better image with a dedicated camera than with a good built-in smartphone camera. This is unless you are shooting subjects that smartphones don't really have the capability to shoot, such as ultra-wide-angle shots, for instance in real estate or architecture shooting, or tele shots in wildlife, birding, motor sports, or similar shooting. On the other hand, in poor lighting conditions, some smartphones now produce better pics than ANY dedicated camera does, at least unless you are willing to do a substantial amount of post-processing with images from the latter.

Family pics present no relevant limitations, so again, if you are not really interested in getting into photography more seriously, use a decent phone.

Thank you for your reply. You are spot on as I do not have an interest to get into photography (no offense to anyone), I just want to be able to capture pics of her when she is doing something that only lasts a few seconds and it not be blurry or out of focus. to use on special events like birthdays and when we go on vacations. I have an IPhone 8+ which I believe has a decent camera but plan to upgrade to the 12 when it comes out so as you suggest that might be my better option vs getting a dedicated camera.

I have replied to other posters as well however my replies don’t publish until a moderator approves them and some of my replies have been pending for over a day so apologies for the delay in responding to everyone that has take them the time to reply and help.

TacticDesigns
TacticDesigns Veteran Member • Posts: 8,116
Re: Camera for Parents

amindu wrote:

Thank you all for your comments to address a few questions.

$5-600 US dollars

i was using the camera in the P mode and the intelligent mode.

we were in our living room with the lights on as well as getting direct sunlight

the camera in use was a Sony HX50V

Will take a look at some of the smaller mirror less cameras however can you get away with just having one lens that will be sufficient 90-95% of the time versus having to carry around multiple lenses and at the same time be compact enough to actually take it places

IMHO it depends on how compact you consider compact.

For vacations, most of the time I walk around with a waterproof compact camera. (Fujifilm XP80.)

But for those times I am willing to take along a bigger camera, I take my Nikon D5100 (dSLR) with a single superzoom lens (Nikon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6).

So, with the single superzoom lens I get wide angle shots of the (This is where we were - variety) and the 135mm at the long end of the lens lets me go some close-up shots of far away things.

The Nikon 18-135mm (or the 18-140mm) lenses are not that much bigger than the kit lens. It makes a great (IMHO) one camera + one lens combination that is great for walking around, vacation and family get togethers.

For our L.A. vacation, I used my Nikon D7000 (dSLR) with that 18-135mm superzoom when I bothered carrying around a big camera. It let me got lots of pictures while riding the tour bus. It was wide enough to do selfies. And long enough to get pictures of my older daughter trying out surfing.

Of course . . . if you aren't bothered with long range shots, then the kits lens will still let you get lots of keepers.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

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