What is your adapted lens "system"

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
Will X New Member • Posts: 23
What is your adapted lens "system"

I recently got into adapting "vintage" lens with my Fuji X-E3. Originally I was only thinking about attaching a few M mount lenses that I already have. Then I read about lens characters, swirly bokeh, hidden gems, radio active elements. I started with Minolta 50mm PG 1.4 and macro thinking about building an SR mount kit. It took me a long time and a lot of research to decide on this mount. But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount at a good price. Not to mention I recently bought a set of Pentax 110 primes to play with. I also have a few Nikon AF lenses lying around that I haven't touched. There are also some "must haves" like Helios 44 and Jupiter 8 that I am waiting to get. One last thing, I really don't like Fuji crop sensor only system so might eventually switch to some other full frame body.

So, with the original intent to cut down on adapters and I still ended up with a lot of adapters. Most of which are XX to Fuji so if I switch digital body system then I have to rebuy all the adapters. I think I want to be more intentional about building a "kit". I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things. I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

SQLGuy
SQLGuy Forum Pro • Posts: 10,123
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
3

No management whatsoever. I started with adapting as a way to get new use out of my old Canon FD lenses, but now I see adapted lenses as A) a way to pick best of breed, or best value, for interesting old lenses and B) just a fun way to give new life to lenses that otherwise would probably never create another photograph.

When I go to a photo swap meet, I mainly have adapters in my bag, so I can try out almost anything that someone has for sale.

Having a bunch of cheap adapters is fine because they're cheap, and because it allows you to leave the lenses on the adapters full time.

Yes, if you switch to a different mount you'll need to buy new adapters. I would say, don't do that too often I feel I made a good choice picking E mount back in 2010.

-- hide signature --

A7R2 with SEL2470Z and a number of adapted lenses (Canon FD, Minolta AF, Canon EF, Leica, Nikon...); A7R converted to IR.

 SQLGuy's gear list:SQLGuy's gear list
Canon PowerShot G9 Canon PowerShot S100 (2000) Canon EOS-1D Canon EOS 5D Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro +24 more
aidaho Regular Member • Posts: 389
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
2

On the bayonet end I'm currently Sony only. On the lens end I don't have a preferred system.

If lens somehow fits one of my Sony bodies, has Leica-style focus direction and generally looks good to me, welcome aboard.

Re-buying adapters carries minuscule costs comparing to re-buying native lens system, so I'm not too worried.

Will X wrote:

I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things. I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

A word of advice: close the tab and loose the password, start running and don't look back

In a word: we don't.

-- hide signature --

I like to shoot with manual lenses. Here are some of my photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/curry-hexagon/

John Michael Winterbourne
John Michael Winterbourne Veteran Member • Posts: 3,174
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
2

"But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount"

I seem to be getting too grumpy for this forum - but how on earth can someone "randomly buy" something, and then go public to ask for advice/thoughts on adapted lens "systems"?

 John Michael Winterbourne's gear list:John Michael Winterbourne's gear list
Olympus C-300 Zoom Fujifilm X100T Canon EOS 5D Nikon D70 Nikon D80 +39 more
MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,118
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
2

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

"But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount"

I seem to be getting too grumpy for this forum - but how on earth can someone "randomly buy" something, and then go public to ask for advice/thoughts on adapted lens "systems"?

I have “randomly” bought into a few mount systems then found that I might like to make my purchase into “a set”.

Perhaps not so much asking for advice but a confession of an impending addiction?

-- hide signature --

Tom Caldwell

sensiblename99 Contributing Member • Posts: 560
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

There's no avoiding an extensive collection of adapters if you want to use vintage lenses unless you limit the number of brands of lenses eg just Olympus or just Minolta. On the other hand if the practicality is the issue then just stick with oem zoom lenses in the first place.

I prefer the Sony full frame bodies and use a7r2 and a7r4 for all adapted lenses and this would be my recommendation because of the ff sensor and short flange distance. I use about 8 systems (eg canon, Nikon, etc) but also use about 20+ different brands of enlarging lenses many of which use custom made adapters, rings, plates, helicoids etc collected and made over several years. The sony bodies are great for this.

If you go shooting with several lenses of the same brand then you can lighten the load and use a single adapter which can remain on the camera. I tend not to do this and would typically use 3 or 4 lenses of different brands each with its own adapter fitted. The latter is obviously more bulky.

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,118
A "system" usually is cobbled together

I started with Russian LTM mount lenses. They were even cheaper then and our AUD$ was strong and I only needed LM-LTM ring adapter for each of them as I was using a Ricoh GXR-M at the time. So an adapter for each lens. I soon realised that there were not that many Russian as their confusing numbering system might have indicated. So why not get a selection? Of course there were limits as the rare ones were very expensive and very hard to find. Even prototypes were disposed of. Then I found that their M42 types were also not as numerous as first thought* and arguably of a slightly better build standard. Now I was buying one M42-LM adapter as the need to have an adapter per lens did not seem so pressing.

* The Helios-44 is an exception all of its own - there were literally millions made and maybe as many as 20 versions of it over several different factories. Just collecting the H-44 could be a cause all on its own.

I was going to only buy LTM/LM and M42 but have “backslid” into FD, DKL, M645, Pentax-110, Altix (!!?) ... I already had PK but have resisted going further, Minolta - only two, Exakta - just a few, Nikon - none, Olympus - none, a few “singles” of others (more accidents and curiosity) ... My early EF lenses have become an adapted mount system all on their own. Travelled from Canon EF dslr to Sony E/FE to M4/3 added Panasonic L - I can go back to Sony E/FE if I ever choose to do so and with suitable adapters I can re-use them on Canon RF, EF-M, Nikon Z, Fuji X should I ever choose to do so. Seems to a better deal to get adequate performance from adapted EF lenses than commit wholly to collecting another series of electronic system lenses and committing myself to only using that system.

Which of course leads to the principal attraction of legacy MF lenses - not only can we use lenses made for many mount systems by choice but we can also use them on many camera system hosts. The lenses are priced such that almost any budget could be within range and only the electronic and focal reduction adapters could be said to anything like expensive.

My cheapest adapters were a set of 20 made LTM-M4/3 for AUD$3.40 each posted. This is about US$2.20 in today’s money. They were bought from China but posted form Laos. Machined from sold aluminium but their registration distance was perfect and they can do the job. As digital LTM bodies don’t exist and they were much cheaper than even LTM-LM adapter rings it was worth dedicating an adapter per lens.

I generally don’t double adapt as there is always a chance that registration errors can multiply. But I find that M645 is actually easier to adapt to EF and then from EF to M4/3. In the process I can optionally insert EF-M4/3 focal reduction and/or M645-EF shift and/or EF-M4/3 tilt.

I did not provide you with a system and only an addiction warning and the need for a system. But when I store my lenses I store them by maker and that generally sorts out the made mount system in the process. I have a set of specimen drawers where I store battery types, chargers, and a collection of spare adapters.

-- hide signature --

Tom Caldwell

fferreres Veteran Member • Posts: 6,179
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

Will X wrote:

I recently got into adapting "vintage" lens with my Fuji X-E3. Originally I was only thinking about attaching a few M mount lenses that I already have. Then I read about lens characters, swirly bokeh, hidden gems, radio active elements. I started with Minolta 50mm PG 1.4 and macro thinking about building an SR mount kit. It took me a long time and a lot of research to decide on this mount. But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount at a good price. Not to mention I recently bought a set of Pentax 110 primes to play with. I also have a few Nikon AF lenses lying around that I haven't touched. There are also some "must haves" like Helios 44 and Jupiter 8 that I am waiting to get. One last thing, I really don't like Fuji crop sensor only system so might eventually switch to some other full frame body.

So, with the original intent to cut down on adapters and I still ended up with a lot of adapters. Most of which are XX to Fuji so if I switch digital body system then I have to rebuy all the adapters. I think I want to be more intentional about building a "kit".

I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things.

I said exactly this a month after starting out with a ...Minolta 58/1.4 PG. I also have a lot of adapters , want to cut down on lenses but I try to use as many (to avoid the collector label) and, I think it was yesterday...I bought (bad deal, too expansive) my fist Large Format lens in XexcelL shutter, a dagor from around 1910 that may be broken. BUT, I am still trying to cut down on lenses.

I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

I decided to stick to very very few “one offs” and created about 5-6 bags. For other systems I may have one or two, sometimes 3 lenses max, and bowed to never get more of them.

So the bags are:

Topcor RE (plus the three R Autos)

Rollei QBM

Contax/Russian Kiev sets

Minolta

Zeiss EXA

Zoom Set: Contax Vario-Sonnar (28 to 300mm)

I do have a Helios. Two Contarex. 3 Pentax. 3 Yashica ML. A few Meyer, Schacht, and unique things like one Kilfit.

It’s hard to draw a line. And in reality, I noticed when I take photos, I prefer max 3 lens options. They restrict me, and force me to be more intentful but also allow me to be more spontaneous (since, you adopt a photographic mind of the FL you have mounted).

trungtran Senior Member • Posts: 1,389
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
2

Welcome to the rabbit hole.

I started with M42 because the adapter to EF was $1.50. Mother in Law gave me an MD 50mm 1.7 so that started the SR mount.

Found great deals on lenses so bought a bunch.

Set of EF-M adapters, Moved over to E mount so had to get a set for that mount.

Started picking up bodies, so now i have adapters for NX mount and M43.

I gave up a long time ago, sometimes its hard to resist a bargain.

Good luck sticking to a couple of mounts.

 trungtran's gear list:trungtran's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Sony a7 II Canon EOS M6
Travis Butler
Travis Butler Senior Member • Posts: 1,438
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
4

aidaho wrote:

Will X wrote:

I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things. I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

A word of advice: close the tab and loose the password, start running and don't look back

It's too late. We've got him now. ^_-

In a word: we don't.

Pretty much.

For Will:

I do like to have 'sets' of matching lenses for a mount when I travel light; there's usually one or two 'core' lens that are the main things I want to shoot with, and then it's nice to have a couple of others in the same mount to support the core. So to name a couple of examples:

  • In Olympus OM mount:
    • The 24/2.8 is one of my favorite lenses period, and the 100/2.8 is a great small tele that's easy to always have in my kit bag.
    • For more specialty uses, the 200/5 is probably the smallest/lightest/most convenient 200mm I've seen (though I don't shoot at 200mm very often) and the 50/3.5 Macro is a similarly small/light macro with great IQ.
    • So I start with the 24 and 100 as the 'core' - or the 200/50 macro if I'm thinking of specialty shooting. Then I start adding support lenses:
      • The 28-48/4 is a nice wide-to-normal zoom that's also small enough to add flexibility to the kit without much extra size/weight (in fact, it's currently riding around with me most of the time).
      • The 50/1.4 is a great fast 50; the only reason it's not a 'core' lens is because I have several great 50/1.4's. But it's a great companion when I want to stick to OM Zuikos.
      • The 50/1.8 also has an excellent reputation (higher than the 50/1.4's) and is even smaller and lighter. I got a couple of copies a few months ago thanks to kcdogger, but with everything else going on I haven't had much time to shoot with them.
      • I found a 35/2 for $12 at a local sale, a year or two ago; the case was badly battered and the lens was kinda grimy, but it cleaned up nicely. Makes a nice complement to the 28-48 when I want something faster.
      • I don't shoot at 135mm very often, but the 135/3.5 is pretty cheap, small/light (noticing a trend here?), and easy to find; I've seen several copies at local sales, so grabbing one to throw in the bag when I want to stick with OM Zuikos is a no-brainer.
      • I was browsing Roberts Camera's used site for something else when I happened across a 35-105/3.5-4.5 for $26; at that price, it was worth trying as a backup/very flexible fill-in. Looks promising so far.
      • The 85/2 has a great reputation, and I'd love to get one to fill in the 'prime gap' between the 50/1.4 and 100/2.8; but it's priced pretty high for the amount I'd probably use it, so it's on the 'keep an eye out for a reasonably-priced copy' list.
      • The 35-70/4 is a decent midrange zoom; I could get by in most situations with just the 24, the 100, and the 35-70 in between. But it's not my favorite midrange...
  • In Minolta SR (MC/MD) mount:
    • The MD 35-70/3.5 (in either the MD II or near-identical MD III macro version) is probably my favorite adapted zoom - good color, contrast, clarity and sharpness. When I want to go *really* minimal, the 35-70 can handle 70-80% of my shooting. It's a 'core' all by itself. But it's not very fast, and there are gaps on both the wide and tele ends. So let's start filling in with support lenses...
    • The Minolta lineup has a lot of great mid-to-fast 50s; you're spoiled for choice:
      • The PG 58/1.2  is a legendary bokeh monster; so legendary that the price is way up there, more than I could justify spending for how much I'd probably use it.
      • Also at 58mm, the Rokkor-PF 58/1.4 does not do well for me at infinity, and has a tendency to flare, but has some great color and rendering at short-to-midrange.
      • The MC Rokkor-PG 50/1.4 is a classic fast 50 I like a good bit.
      • Its successor the MD II Rokkor-X 50/1.4 is also great, somewhat lighter and smaller, but more plastic in the construction. Both great lenses.
      • The 50/1.7 is smaller and lighter than its corresponding 50/1.4 cousin. I've used both MC Rokkor and MD-III versions; the MC has a more satisfying mechanical feel, the MD-III has a lot more plastic but is significantly smaller and lighter.
    • Wide is someplace I'm still looking:
      • The MD W.Rokkor 28/2.8 is perfectly competent, reasonably light and not too large, but hasn't really stood out in the shots I've taken with it.
      • ProfHankD really likes the SI Rokkor 28/2.5. I recently found a copy and it looks promising so far; but it's fairly large and heavy, so much so that it kind of defeats the purpose of saving space/weight by minimizing adapters.
      • The 24-50/4 is a nice versatile wide-normal zoom, along the lines of the OM Zuiko 28-48; but it's also a lot larger and heavier than the 28-48, so again it kind of defeats the purpose. 
      • I've seen mostly good reviews on the MD 24/2.8, and would like to try it - but haven't run across a copy locally, and the OM Zuiko 24/2.8 is good enough that I haven't gone out of my way to order a copy.
    • Tele is also an area I'm still looking:
      • The MD 70-210/4 is the predecessor to the famous 70-210 'beercan', and it perfectly complements the 35-70's range - but it's also Big and Heavy, so much that it's not something I carry around normally.
      • The MD 35-105/3.5 is a lot more reasonable in size and weight, and can even replace the 35-70; but it's still large and heavy enough to be uncomfortable on the camera, so I generally prefer the 35-70 unless I absolutely need that extra range.
      • The MD III 135/3.5 is light and small, and optically competent; but the build quality doesn't really impress me, and the IQ doesn't grab me. Still, it's something I can pack along if I really want the extra range.
      • The MD 85/2 is another highly reputed 85mm lens that I'd like to try, but just like the OM Zuiko 85/2, it's too expensive for the amount I'd probably use it.
      • The MD 100/2.5 looks promising, and will probably pick up one to try if I run across one at a reasonable price, but haven't felt the urge to with the OM 100/2.8 at hand.

So... those are a couple of sample 'kits' I could put together if I want to minimize the number of adapters I want to bring with me. In practice, though, cutting down on the adapter count usually isn't worth it, and I go with a mix. So the OM 24/2.8 stays on the camera, with the OM 100/2.8 in the bag; the MD 35-70 is often present, but will also substitute with the OM 28-48 if I want to make room for other lenses. I usually have a fast 50, either the OM 50/1.4 or the Rokkor-PG 50/1.4. I may bring along the Rokkor-PG 58/1.4 if I want to do close-to-midrange shots with lots of bokeh and rendering. Or the VIvitar 90/2.5 Macro (Bokina) if I'm serious about doing close-in shooting that day.

Whew. That was a lot longer than I was originally going to write. ^^;;

-- hide signature --

Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_prof67/ Warning: Heavy Learning in progress.

 Travis Butler's gear list:Travis Butler's gear list
Fujifilm X20 Nikon Coolpix A Pentax Q Pentax K-50 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 +18 more
Guito55 Regular Member • Posts: 192
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

I'll take all of them for $500, Alex.

eyeswideshut Regular Member • Posts: 338
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

Will X wrote:

I recently got into adapting "vintage" lens with my Fuji X-E3. Originally I was only thinking about attaching a few M mount lenses that I already have. Then I read about lens characters, swirly bokeh, hidden gems, radio active elements. I started with Minolta 50mm PG 1.4 and macro thinking about building an SR mount kit. It took me a long time and a lot of research to decide on this mount. But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount at a good price. Not to mention I recently bought a set of Pentax 110 primes to play with. I also have a few Nikon AF lenses lying around that I haven't touched. There are also some "must haves" like Helios 44 and Jupiter 8 that I am waiting to get. One last thing, I really don't like Fuji crop sensor only system so might eventually switch to some other full frame body.

So, with the original intent to cut down on adapters and I still ended up with a lot of adapters. Most of which are XX to Fuji so if I switch digital body system then I have to rebuy all the adapters. I think I want to be more intentional about building a "kit". I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things. I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

Welcome to adapter hell.

Basically you already know what you are doing and it comes down to either biting the bullet and getting the requisite adapters for each mount/camera combination - or you could standardize around the Leica M mount. Thus you might get adapters for Exakta => M, M42 => M, FDn => M, Om => M Leica R => M, LTM => M etc. etc.

Cap this whith one good adapter for Leica M => Fuji X. Now if ever you decide to get another camera, say Sony E mount, all you need is one adapter for Leica M => E.

One caveat here is that this stacking of adapters really calls for tight tolerances and that is something that the chinese manufacturers are, ahem, currently working on. They are, however, much improved over cheap adapters from ten years ago, so mostly it will work.

For your Pentax 110 primes you will need one adapter for each mount as the flange distance is far too short to use with Leica M. Also, be sure to get an adapter with built-in iris, it is worth it.

-- hide signature --

Cheers
eyeswideshut

Guito55 Regular Member • Posts: 192
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

eyeswideshut wrote:

Will X wrote:

I recently got into adapting "vintage" lens with my Fuji X-E3. Originally I was only thinking about attaching a few M mount lenses that I already have. Then I read about lens characters, swirly bokeh, hidden gems, radio active elements. I started with Minolta 50mm PG 1.4 and macro thinking about building an SR mount kit. It took me a long time and a lot of research to decide on this mount. But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount at a good price. Not to mention I recently bought a set of Pentax 110 primes to play with. I also have a few Nikon AF lenses lying around that I haven't touched. There are also some "must haves" like Helios 44 and Jupiter 8 that I am waiting to get. One last thing, I really don't like Fuji crop sensor only system so might eventually switch to some other full frame body.

So, with the original intent to cut down on adapters and I still ended up with a lot of adapters. Most of which are XX to Fuji so if I switch digital body system then I have to rebuy all the adapters. I think I want to be more intentional about building a "kit". I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things. I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

Welcome to adapter hell.

Basically you already know what you are doing and it comes down to either biting the bullet and getting the requisite adapters for each mount/camera combination - or you could standardize around the Leica M mount. Thus you might get adapters for Exakta => M, M42 => M, FDn => M, Om => M Leica R => M, LTM => M etc. etc.

Cap this whith one good adapter for Leica M => Fuji X. Now if ever you decide to get another camera, say Sony E mount, all you need is one adapter for Leica M => E.

One caveat here is that this stacking of adapters really calls for tight tolerances and that is something that the chinese manufacturers are, ahem, currently working on. They are, however, much improved over cheap adapters from ten years ago, so mostly it will work.

For your Pentax 110 primes you will need one adapter for each mount as the flange distance is far too short to use with Leica M. Also, be sure to get an adapter with built-in iris, it is worth it.

You can't discount your filters size.when adapting either. If your filters are 58mm and your adapted lenses are smaller/bigger you need adapter.

Brian Chichester
Brian Chichester Regular Member • Posts: 489
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
1

I started out adapting lenses because I had some old Minolta MD lenses from my film days, which I realised could be repurposed cheaply on my M4/3 camera.

Then I started noticing some old M42 lens bargains (in places such as charity shops) which I now knew could be used with adapters. So I had parallel MD and M42 lens line-ups as well as a few native lenses.

I was on the slippery slope, and it was only when I bought a DKL to M42 adapter so I could use a 'bargain' Schneider Retina lens that the full extent of my fall became clear.

Just about anything will adapt to M4/3 because of the short register, but the focal length multiplier affects one's choices.

So, there's no system, just a continual effort to exercise restraint.

 Brian Chichester's gear list:Brian Chichester's gear list
Sony Alpha NEX-5N Sony Alpha NEX-6 Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus PEN E-PL6 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS +10 more
eyeswideshut Regular Member • Posts: 338
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

Guito55 wrote:

eyeswideshut wrote:

Will X wrote:

I recently got into adapting "vintage" lens with my Fuji X-E3. Originally I was only thinking about attaching a few M mount lenses that I already have. Then I read about lens characters, swirly bokeh, hidden gems, radio active elements. I started with Minolta 50mm PG 1.4 and macro thinking about building an SR mount kit. It took me a long time and a lot of research to decide on this mount. But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount at a good price. Not to mention I recently bought a set of Pentax 110 primes to play with. I also have a few Nikon AF lenses lying around that I haven't touched. There are also some "must haves" like Helios 44 and Jupiter 8 that I am waiting to get. One last thing, I really don't like Fuji crop sensor only system so might eventually switch to some other full frame body.

So, with the original intent to cut down on adapters and I still ended up with a lot of adapters. Most of which are XX to Fuji so if I switch digital body system then I have to rebuy all the adapters. I think I want to be more intentional about building a "kit". I have no intention of becoming a vintage camera collector and really don't want to have a collection of lenses and mounts that do mostly the same things. I was wondering how you guys manage your own kit when there's practically sea of affordable gems out there.

Welcome to adapter hell.

Basically you already know what you are doing and it comes down to either biting the bullet and getting the requisite adapters for each mount/camera combination - or you could standardize around the Leica M mount. Thus you might get adapters for Exakta => M, M42 => M, FDn => M, Om => M Leica R => M, LTM => M etc. etc.

Cap this whith one good adapter for Leica M => Fuji X. Now if ever you decide to get another camera, say Sony E mount, all you need is one adapter for Leica M => E.

One caveat here is that this stacking of adapters really calls for tight tolerances and that is something that the chinese manufacturers are, ahem, currently working on. They are, however, much improved over cheap adapters from ten years ago, so mostly it will work.

For your Pentax 110 primes you will need one adapter for each mount as the flange distance is far too short to use with Leica M. Also, be sure to get an adapter with built-in iris, it is worth it.

You can't discount your filters size.when adapting either. If your filters are 58mm and your adapted lenses are smaller/bigger you need adapter.

Very true, although that would be the other end of the lens, right?

-- hide signature --

Cheers
eyeswideshut

Heritage Cameras
Heritage Cameras Senior Member • Posts: 1,705
Not all filters go on the front of the lens
1

eyeswideshut wrote:

Guito55 wrote:

You can't discount your filters size.when adapting either. If your filters are 58mm and your adapted lenses are smaller/bigger you need adapter.

Very true, although that would be the other end of the lens, right?

Not necessarily:

https://www.dpreview.com/news/1107551916/breakthrough-photography-announces-more-than-20-drop-in-filters-for-canon-s-ef-rf-adapter

-- hide signature --

Dave, HCL

 Heritage Cameras's gear list:Heritage Cameras's gear list
Sony a7
AdaptedLenses Regular Member • Posts: 471
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
1

I too have "accidentally" won auctions for things I have no idea why I looked at in the first place.

Tom Caldwell wrote:

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

"But then I randomly won a Vivitar 135mm close focus in FD mount"

I seem to be getting too grumpy for this forum - but how on earth can someone "randomly buy" something, and then go public to ask for advice/thoughts on adapted lens "systems"?

I have “randomly” bought into a few mount systems then found that I might like to make my purchase into “a set”.

Perhaps not so much asking for advice but a confession of an impending addiction?

fferreres Veteran Member • Posts: 6,179
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
1

Brian Chichester wrote:

I started out adapting lenses because I had some old Minolta MD lenses from my film days,

+1

which I realised could be repurposed cheaply on my M4/3 camera.

+1

Then I started noticing some old M42 lens bargains (in places such as charity shops) which I now knew could be used with adapters. So I had parallel MD and M42 lens line-ups as well as a few native lenses.

+1

I was on the slippery slope, and it was only when I bought a DKL to M42 adapter so I could use a 'bargain' Schneider Retina lens that the full extent of my fall became clear.

Replace with QBM +1

Just about anything will adapt to M4/3 because of the short register, but the focal length multiplier affects one's choices.

So, there's no system, just a continual effort to exercise restraint.

+100,000

AdaptedLenses Regular Member • Posts: 471
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"
3

But when hundreds, if not thousands, of interesting lenses are available for $10, $25, $50 or maybe $100, why exercise any restraint? 

Buy em, try em, sell the ones you don't care for.

fferreres wrote:

Brian Chichester wrote:

I started out adapting lenses because I had some old Minolta MD lenses from my film days,

+1

which I realised could be repurposed cheaply on my M4/3 camera.

+1

Then I started noticing some old M42 lens bargains (in places such as charity shops) which I now knew could be used with adapters. So I had parallel MD and M42 lens line-ups as well as a few native lenses.

+1

I was on the slippery slope, and it was only when I bought a DKL to M42 adapter so I could use a 'bargain' Schneider Retina lens that the full extent of my fall became clear.

Replace with QBM +1

Just about anything will adapt to M4/3 because of the short register, but the focal length multiplier affects one's choices.

So, there's no system, just a continual effort to exercise restraint.

+100,000

casperskitty
casperskitty Senior Member • Posts: 1,772
Re: What is your adapted lens "system"

I owned vintage lenses long before I owned a mirrorless camera. Or even a DSLR. I picked up a Minolta SR-7 with a 50/1.7 and then picked up a 135/2.8 not long after. I'm always being given cameras and lenses too so now I have more Minolta mount lenses, but also Pentax and Yashica and Konica.

I got my Sony nex as part of a trade a couple of years ago and started buying adapters. I've been thinking about getting an adapter for the lens mounts I don't yet have. I also have some Pentax 110 lenses. And currently I'm trying to adapt a Rikenon 100/2.8 that came from a Ricoh 126c-flex. I finally received all the parts and they fit together but one spins so new plan I guess.

There is no organization. It's a bit chaotic. But good.

-- hide signature --

Having is not so pleasing a thing as wanting, it may not be logical but it is often true. ~Mr. Spock, Star Trek

 casperskitty's gear list:casperskitty's gear list
Sony Alpha NEX-6 Sigma 60mm F2.8 DN Art
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads