Macro Lighting Advice

Started 2 months ago | Discussions
Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Macro Lighting Advice

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

stevendillonphoto Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
1

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

Joe,

Hope this doesn't throw too much of a monkey wrench into your plans, but there is another option.  I don't use any kind of flash and never have - strictly natural light.  It does complicate things in other ways though.  If you're interested in seeing what kind of results you can get without flash, feel free to poke around on my site.  Lots of macro flowers to see under the Galleries menu (The Beauty Within, Flora, and Naturally Abstract collections).

-- hide signature --

Steven Dillon - Capturing Nature's Art - http://www.stevendillonphoto.com

OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

Joe,

Hope this doesn't throw too much of a monkey wrench into your plans, but there is another option. I don't use any kind of flash and never have - strictly natural light. It does complicate things in other ways though. If you're interested in seeing what kind of results you can get without flash, feel free to poke around on my site. Lots of macro flowers to see under the Galleries menu (The Beauty Within, Flora, and Naturally Abstract collections).

Hi Steven,

Not at all, I appreciate your comments and in fact it’s good to see some of the amazing images you have taken just by using natural light. It was another side to my thinking was whether it’s even worth spending £400 odd pound on a macro flash when infact you can get just as good without & hens saving money.

Following this, if I did decide to not go down the route of flash and stick with natural light, is there any other equipment or software you use or could recommend to help expand my macro photography. I currently have an Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III with a 60mm macro.

Thanks again, Joe

BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,581
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
2

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

My logic is to get a TTL speedlight that can be used with all your lenses and modify it for macro use with diffusers. You can use a speedlight on or off camera.

There are a multitude of uses for flash besides macro. It won't go to waste. What you learn using the speedlight for macro/close-up will teach you to do anything with it.

OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

My logic is to get a TTL speedlight that can be used with all your lenses and modify it for macro use with diffusers. You can use a speedlight on or off camera.

There are a multitude of uses for flash besides macro. It won't go to waste. What you learn using the speedlight for macro/close-up will teach you to do anything with it.

Thank you for the advice & tips, much appreciated

BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,581
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
1

Joe94 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

My logic is to get a TTL speedlight that can be used with all your lenses and modify it for macro use with diffusers. You can use a speedlight on or off camera.

There are a multitude of uses for flash besides macro. It won't go to waste. What you learn using the speedlight for macro/close-up will teach you to do anything with it.

Thank you for the advice & tips, much appreciated

I initially got the speedlight specifically for macro/close-up and then found how useful it was. Now, I take it everywhere I go. I don't know how I ever got by without it.

Rodger in Edmonton
Rodger in Edmonton Senior Member • Posts: 2,834
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
2

Scroll through the threads in this forum Joe and you will find dissertations on lighting products and techniques - they generally break down b/w those who use Speed Lights  1 mounted or  or 2 on arms and those who use ring lights - to each her or his own and build your own diffusers.

There are threads on this matter also.

Don't run out and buy. Study the problem, your gear and consider what you will be shooting most of the time. IMHO almsot all the best flash rigs are a mix of bought flashes and DIY diffusers and materials people try.

If you mix and match brands ; you must ensure all triggers will fire with your set parameters, ones es such threads time to time and almost all solvable with a bit of research.

-- hide signature --

Best Regards, Rodger
Save Lives - Be an Organ or Stem Cell Donor.
Quaecumque vera

Rmark
Rmark Senior Member • Posts: 1,035
Re: Macromeds
1

Mark Berkery , ( screen name Macromeds) has a number of posts on his lighting techniques on this forum as well as the micro four third forum.

He uses camera mounted flash with home made custom diffusers, that he describes in his posts.  
I have nowhere near the skill level of photographers on this forum , most of my close up photography is clinical photography in a dental residency program. I use a ring flash ( Metz 15-MS-1). It’s quite fool proof, easy to use by beginners and gives very reproducible results with very little effort.  I suspect the Olympus twin flash would work the same.

 Rmark's gear list:Rmark's gear list
Sony RX100 II Olympus E-M1 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 9-18mm 1:4.0-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50-200mm 1:2.8-3.5 SWD +5 more
OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

Scroll through the threads in this forum Joe and you will find dissertations on lighting products and techniques - they generally break down b/w those who use Speed Lights 1 mounted or or 2 on arms and those who use ring lights - to each her or his own and build your own diffusers.

There are threads on this matter also.

Don't run out and buy. Study the problem, your gear and consider what you will be shooting most of the time. IMHO almsot all the best flash rigs are a mix of bought flashes and DIY diffusers and materials people try.

If you mix and match brands ; you must ensure all triggers will fire with your set parameters, ones es such threads time to time and almost all solvable with a bit of research.

Thank you Rodger for your advice. I must admit I already have a double speadlight set up that can be used on/off camera, so I think you right that before I go out and buy new kit, I need to research cheaper more affective ways that I can use the equipment I already own.

Cheers, Joe

OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macromeds

Rmark wrote:

Mark Berkery , ( screen name Macromeds) has a number of posts on his lighting techniques on this forum as well as the micro four third forum.

He uses camera mounted flash with home made custom diffusers, that he describes in his posts.
I have nowhere near the skill level of photographers on this forum , most of my close up photography is clinical photography in a dental residency program. I use a ring flash ( Metz 15-MS-1). It’s quite fool proof, easy to use by beginners and gives very reproducible results with very little effort. I suspect the Olympus twin flash would work the same.

Thank you for this, I will take a look at the person you have mentioned.

stevendillonphoto Senior Member • Posts: 1,259
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
1

Joe94 wrote:

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

Joe,

Hope this doesn't throw too much of a monkey wrench into your plans, but there is another option. I don't use any kind of flash and never have - strictly natural light. It does complicate things in other ways though. If you're interested in seeing what kind of results you can get without flash, feel free to poke around on my site. Lots of macro flowers to see under the Galleries menu (The Beauty Within, Flora, and Naturally Abstract collections).

Hi Steven,

Not at all, I appreciate your comments and in fact it’s good to see some of the amazing images you have taken just by using natural light. It was another side to my thinking was whether it’s even worth spending £400 odd pound on a macro flash when infact you can get just as good without & hens saving money.

Following this, if I did decide to not go down the route of flash and stick with natural light, is there any other equipment or software you use or could recommend to help expand my macro photography. I currently have an Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III with a 60mm macro.

Thanks again, Joe

Joe,

Glad to hear it was useful information.  I know when I started I was in your same boat.  I actually initially used flash (mostly because everybody said it was the only way to go).  I had a couple of different units (including a nice ring flash).  But I just wasn't happy with the results, and, more importantly, I found that the photographers whose work I enjoyed the most weren't using flash at all.  So, I decided to try that.  And, I preferred the images without flash.

As I mentioned, it brings with it a whole new set of problems, and, in many ways, makes things more difficult.  A couple of things that have been staples for me: a good, solid, lightweight tripod; a device for holding your subjects (especially flowers) - I use a Plamp; a deflector, and reflector (they are used to control the light); mirror lockup (if your camera has a mirror); and DOF preview for getting the focus and depth just where you want it.

BTW, do NOT attach the plamp to your camera tripod.  Connect it to something else that doesn't touch anything associated with your camera.  I carry an old, cheap tripod and use it to put the Plamp on as well as holding a deflector (when needed).

Also, the right light is HUGE.  Morning light is normally best as the wind is usually lowest during that time since the heat from the sun has yet to stir things up.  I prefer golden hour light as it enhances the colors much more than at any other time of the morning.  I'll usually be packed up and heading home by 10AM having already composed everything that I can.

The wind is going to be your worst enemy.  You'll need LONG shutter times and in some cases extremely long (I've used 10 seconds and more) so wind conditions are also quite important.  Asking Mother Nature to be still for that much time is a tall order so you'll need a good amount of patience as well.  And with flowers it's not always the wind.  Sometimes a big ol' bumble bee will come along (just when the flower has finally stopped moving) and disturb the whole scene.  You might even need to reframe and check your DOF again.

Have fun.  Looking forward to seeing what you create.

-- hide signature --

Steven Dillon - Capturing Nature's Art - http://www.stevendillonphoto.com

OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

Joe,

Hope this doesn't throw too much of a monkey wrench into your plans, but there is another option. I don't use any kind of flash and never have - strictly natural light. It does complicate things in other ways though. If you're interested in seeing what kind of results you can get without flash, feel free to poke around on my site. Lots of macro flowers to see under the Galleries menu (The Beauty Within, Flora, and Naturally Abstract collections).

Hi Steven,

Not at all, I appreciate your comments and in fact it’s good to see some of the amazing images you have taken just by using natural light. It was another side to my thinking was whether it’s even worth spending £400 odd pound on a macro flash when infact you can get just as good without & hens saving money.

Following this, if I did decide to not go down the route of flash and stick with natural light, is there any other equipment or software you use or could recommend to help expand my macro photography. I currently have an Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III with a 60mm macro.

Thanks again, Joe

Joe,

Glad to hear it was useful information. I know when I started I was in your same boat. I actually initially used flash (mostly because everybody said it was the only way to go). I had a couple of different units (including a nice ring flash). But I just wasn't happy with the results, and, more importantly, I found that the photographers whose work I enjoyed the most weren't using flash at all. So, I decided to try that. And, I preferred the images without flash.

As I mentioned, it brings with it a whole new set of problems, and, in many ways, makes things more difficult. A couple of things that have been staples for me: a good, solid, lightweight tripod; a device for holding your subjects (especially flowers) - I use a Plamp; a deflector, and reflector (they are used to control the light); mirror lockup (if your camera has a mirror); and DOF preview for getting the focus and depth just where you want it.

BTW, do NOT attach the plamp to your camera tripod. Connect it to something else that doesn't touch anything associated with your camera. I carry an old, cheap tripod and use it to put the Plamp on as well as holding a deflector (when needed).

Also, the right light is HUGE. Morning light is normally best as the wind is usually lowest during that time since the heat from the sun has yet to stir things up. I prefer golden hour light as it enhances the colors much more than at any other time of the morning. I'll usually be packed up and heading home by 10AM having already composed everything that I can.

The wind is going to be your worst enemy. You'll need LONG shutter times and in some cases extremely long (I've used 10 seconds and more) so wind conditions are also quite important. Asking Mother Nature to be still for that much time is a tall order so you'll need a good amount of patience as well. And with flowers it's not always the wind. Sometimes a big ol' bumble bee will come along (just when the flower has finally stopped moving) and disturb the whole scene. You might even need to reframe and check your DOF again.

Have fun. Looking forward to seeing what you create.

Thank you for this added information, much appreciated

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 7,696
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

Joe94 wrote:

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

Joe,

Hope this doesn't throw too much of a monkey wrench into your plans, but there is another option. I don't use any kind of flash and never have - strictly natural light. It does complicate things in other ways though. If you're interested in seeing what kind of results you can get without flash, feel free to poke around on my site. Lots of macro flowers to see under the Galleries menu (The Beauty Within, Flora, and Naturally Abstract collections).

Hi Steven,

Not at all, I appreciate your comments and in fact it’s good to see some of the amazing images you have taken just by using natural light. It was another side to my thinking was whether it’s even worth spending £400 odd pound on a macro flash when infact you can get just as good without & hens saving money.

Following this, if I did decide to not go down the route of flash and stick with natural light, is there any other equipment or software you use or could recommend to help expand my macro photography. I currently have an Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III with a 60mm macro.

Thanks again, Joe

Joe,

Glad to hear it was useful information. I know when I started I was in your same boat. I actually initially used flash (mostly because everybody said it was the only way to go). I had a couple of different units (including a nice ring flash). But I just wasn't happy with the results, and, more importantly, I found that the photographers whose work I enjoyed the most weren't using flash at all. So, I decided to try that. And, I preferred the images without flash.

As I mentioned, it brings with it a whole new set of problems, and, in many ways, makes things more difficult. A couple of things that have been staples for me: a good, solid, lightweight tripod; a device for holding your subjects (especially flowers) - I use a Plamp; a deflector, and reflector (they are used to control the light); mirror lockup (if your camera has a mirror); and DOF preview for getting the focus and depth just where you want it.

BTW, do NOT attach the plamp to your camera tripod. Connect it to something else that doesn't touch anything associated with your camera. I carry an old, cheap tripod and use it to put the Plamp on as well as holding a deflector (when needed).

Also, the right light is HUGE. Morning light is normally best as the wind is usually lowest during that time since the heat from the sun has yet to stir things up. I prefer golden hour light as it enhances the colors much more than at any other time of the morning. I'll usually be packed up and heading home by 10AM having already composed everything that I can.

The wind is going to be your worst enemy. You'll need LONG shutter times and in some cases extremely long (I've used 10 seconds and more) so wind conditions are also quite important. Asking Mother Nature to be still for that much time is a tall order so you'll need a good amount of patience as well. And with flowers it's not always the wind. Sometimes a big ol' bumble bee will come along (just when the flower has finally stopped moving) and disturb the whole scene. You might even need to reframe and check your DOF again.

Have fun. Looking forward to seeing what you create.

Thank you for this added information, much appreciated

Like Steven, I use natural light for flowers. (I use flash for insects, spiders etc, except for larger subjects like dragonflies and butterflies that I don't often see, but when I do it is usually on a bright sunny day.)

I also agree that the right light is important. However, what light is right depends on personal taste as to what sort of images you like. For my part I often shoot flowers in bright light because I like the effects I can get. I also shoot in breezy conditions (I live in a notoriously windy location), almost always hand-held, with some fairly slow shutter speeds sometimes, and I never touch the subjects (no plamp for example). As with other sorts of close-up/macro there are lots of ways of tackling it and I think it pays to experiment to see what works well for you.

Here are some bright light examples.

OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

gardenersassistant wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

stevendillonphoto wrote:

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

Joe,

Hope this doesn't throw too much of a monkey wrench into your plans, but there is another option. I don't use any kind of flash and never have - strictly natural light. It does complicate things in other ways though. If you're interested in seeing what kind of results you can get without flash, feel free to poke around on my site. Lots of macro flowers to see under the Galleries menu (The Beauty Within, Flora, and Naturally Abstract collections).

Hi Steven,

Not at all, I appreciate your comments and in fact it’s good to see some of the amazing images you have taken just by using natural light. It was another side to my thinking was whether it’s even worth spending £400 odd pound on a macro flash when infact you can get just as good without & hens saving money.

Following this, if I did decide to not go down the route of flash and stick with natural light, is there any other equipment or software you use or could recommend to help expand my macro photography. I currently have an Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III with a 60mm macro.

Thanks again, Joe

Joe,

Glad to hear it was useful information. I know when I started I was in your same boat. I actually initially used flash (mostly because everybody said it was the only way to go). I had a couple of different units (including a nice ring flash). But I just wasn't happy with the results, and, more importantly, I found that the photographers whose work I enjoyed the most weren't using flash at all. So, I decided to try that. And, I preferred the images without flash.

As I mentioned, it brings with it a whole new set of problems, and, in many ways, makes things more difficult. A couple of things that have been staples for me: a good, solid, lightweight tripod; a device for holding your subjects (especially flowers) - I use a Plamp; a deflector, and reflector (they are used to control the light); mirror lockup (if your camera has a mirror); and DOF preview for getting the focus and depth just where you want it.

BTW, do NOT attach the plamp to your camera tripod. Connect it to something else that doesn't touch anything associated with your camera. I carry an old, cheap tripod and use it to put the Plamp on as well as holding a deflector (when needed).

Also, the right light is HUGE. Morning light is normally best as the wind is usually lowest during that time since the heat from the sun has yet to stir things up. I prefer golden hour light as it enhances the colors much more than at any other time of the morning. I'll usually be packed up and heading home by 10AM having already composed everything that I can.

The wind is going to be your worst enemy. You'll need LONG shutter times and in some cases extremely long (I've used 10 seconds and more) so wind conditions are also quite important. Asking Mother Nature to be still for that much time is a tall order so you'll need a good amount of patience as well. And with flowers it's not always the wind. Sometimes a big ol' bumble bee will come along (just when the flower has finally stopped moving) and disturb the whole scene. You might even need to reframe and check your DOF again.

Have fun. Looking forward to seeing what you create.

Thank you for this added information, much appreciated

Like Steven, I use natural light for flowers. (I use flash for insects, spiders etc, except for larger subjects like dragonflies and butterflies that I don't often see, but when I do it is usually on a bright sunny day.)

I also agree that the right light is important. However, what light is right depends on personal taste as to what sort of images you like. For my part I often shoot flowers in bright light because I like the effects I can get. I also shoot in breezy conditions (I live in a notoriously windy location), almost always hand-held, with some fairly slow shutter speeds sometimes, and I never touch the subjects (no plamp for example). As with other sorts of close-up/macro there are lots of ways of tackling it and I think it pays to experiment to see what works well for you.

Here are some bright light examples.

Firstly very nice images, and thank you very much for your advice and comments. I think from all the comments here I there are a number of different types of light which can be used & which work better depending on the circumstance, subject and personal taste.

Since writing this post a few days ago today I actualy got a surprise package, which turned out to be the Oly STF-8 twin flash unit (gift from my dad) and so now I am actualy in a lucky position where I now have LED, twin macro flash, standard speadlight & of course the sunlight aha, so I think now I just need to get out there at different times, find different subjects and learn which light type works best for each scenario and give me images I am happy with.

Thanks again for your help, much appreciated

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 7,696
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
1

Joe94 wrote:

Firstly very nice images,

Thank you.

and thank you very much for your advice and comments. I think from all the comments here I there are a number of different types of light which can be used & which work better depending on the circumstance, subject and personal taste.

Since writing this post a few days ago today I actualy got a surprise package, which turned out to be the Oly STF-8 twin flash unit (gift from my dad) and so now I am actualy in a lucky position where I now have LED, twin macro flash, standard speadlight & of course the sunlight aha, so I think now I just need to get out there at different times, find different subjects and learn which light type works best for each scenario and give me images I am happy with.

What a super surprise. Happy hunting!

Thanks again for your help, much appreciated

jimhughes
jimhughes Senior Member • Posts: 1,356
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
2

Until now, all my insect photos were with natural light.

But I recently an LED ring flash and I'm liking what it can do as 'fill'. I  just wrote a blog post about this:

https://jimhphoto.com/index.php/2020/08/16/insect-macro-with-led-ring-flash/

-- hide signature --

www.jimhphoto.com

OP Joe94 Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

jimhughes wrote:

Until now, all my insect photos were with natural light.

But I recently an LED ring flash and I'm liking what it can do as 'fill'. I just wrote a blog post about this:

https://jimhphoto.com/index.php/2020/08/16/insect-macro-with-led-ring-flash/

Thank you, I will give this a read. But also very nice images!

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 7,696
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
1

jimhughes wrote:

Until now, all my insect photos were with natural light.

Nice. I like the muted colours and the way the subject stands out so well between the foreground and background. Very attractive.

But I recently an LED ring flash and I'm liking what it can do as 'fill'. I just wrote a blog post about this:

https://jimhphoto.com/index.php/2020/08/16/insect-macro-with-led-ring-flash/

Very interesting about FP mode and the LED "flash". Well done discovering that.

jimhughes
jimhughes Senior Member • Posts: 1,356
Re: Macro Lighting Advice

gardenersassistant wrote:

jimhughes wrote:

Until now, all my insect photos were with natural light.

Nice. I like the muted colours and the way the subject stands out so well between the foreground and background. Very attractive.

But I recently an LED ring flash and I'm liking what it can do as 'fill'. I just wrote a blog post about this:

https://jimhphoto.com/index.php/2020/08/16/insect-macro-with-led-ring-flash/

Very interesting about FP mode and the LED "flash". Well done discovering that.

Lets start a web site/forum for "Retired Guys Mostly Shooting Things in the Yard during COVID-19".

-- hide signature --

www.jimhphoto.com

SUPER-ELMAR
SUPER-ELMAR Forum Member • Posts: 56
Re: Macro Lighting Advice
1

Joe94 wrote:

Morning everyone,

Im after some advice, I’m look for the best lighting option for macro photography (insects, flowers etc..) for my Olympus & am trying to decide whether I’m better of getting the STF-8 Macro Twin Flash or use a single speadlight with some kind of diffusion?

many thanks,
Joe

I borrowed the STF-8 over the weekend and really enjoyed using it.  Great results with minimal fuss on the E-M1X.  I still play with diffusers to get the look I want on highly reflective surfaces.

 SUPER-ELMAR's gear list:SUPER-ELMAR's gear list
Ricoh GR III Leica M10 Olympus OM-D E-M1X Hasselblad X1D II 50C Leica Noctilux-M 50mm f/0.95 ASPH +5 more
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