Lens Hood on Tele ?

Started 3 months ago | Polls
tirediron Regular Member • Posts: 124
Re: Lens hood

Chris R-UK wrote:

All of the telephoto zoom lenses that I have owned (about eight, including a Canon 100-400mm MkI) have had normal cylindrical hoods. It has been the shorter focal length zooms that go to wide angles that have had petal shaped hoods.

Interesting, maybe it's a Nikon thing. The 70-200 has a very pronounced 'petal' design, as does their 70-300 .

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 13,314
Re: Lens hood

tirediron wrote:

Chris R-UK wrote:

All of the telephoto zoom lenses that I have owned (about eight, including a Canon 100-400mm MkI) have had normal cylindrical hoods. It has been the shorter focal length zooms that go to wide angles that have had petal shaped hoods.

Interesting, maybe it's a Nikon thing. The 70-200 has a very pronounced 'petal' design, as does their 70-300 .

so do the Sony in the similar range, the same for the Canon 70-200mm . I think it has to do with the 70mm start.

Gato Amarillo Veteran Member • Posts: 7,018
Re: Lens Hood on Tele ?

A hood will make a difference in some conditions, especially when the sun is high or when shooting into the sun.

Looking at your photos and subject matter, I'm thinking some of your problem may be atmospheric haze. You could somewhat overcome that in processing your files.

Gato

Smaug01
MOD Smaug01 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,442
Always on when outdoors

Not having it on outdoors sometimes means lens flare, which hurts contrast. There's no point in having it on indoors, except if there's a lot of bright lights. (or as a guard for the front element)

You can also add contrast to your images in post-processing.

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OP yousaf Senior Member • Posts: 1,234
Re: Always on when outdoors

Smaug01 wrote:

Not having it on outdoors sometimes means lens flare, which hurts contrast. There's no point in having it on indoors, except if there's a lot of bright lights. (or as a guard for the front element)

You can also add contrast to your images in post-processing.

In conditions like these, you can't do much in post.

I usually add contrast in LR using contrast slider and then process in PS, using levels and curves.

Gato Amarillo Veteran Member • Posts: 7,018
Re: Always on when outdoors

yousaf wrote:

...

In conditions like these, you can't do much in post.

I usually add contrast in LR using contrast slider and then process in PS, using levels and curves.

Have you tried the Clarity and/or Dehaze sliders in Camera Raw? Those are my go-to points for problems like this.

Gato

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