For focus stacking, which is better?

Started 2 months ago | Discussions
Mark_A
Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 16,061
For focus stacking, which is better?

For focus stacking, which is better?

Is it better to fix the camera and rotate the focus ring on the lens?

Or better to have the camera and lens on a plate and move the whole camera and lens while taking the individual images?

Mark_A
.
A thread of photos from SmartPhones ..
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64212858

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 16,061
Re: For focus stacking, which is better?

Mark_A wrote:

For focus stacking, which is better?

Is it better to fix the camera and rotate the focus ring on the lens?

Or better to have the camera and lens on a plate and move the whole camera and lens while taking the individual images?

At the risk of answering my own question, I also might try focus stacking for landscapes for which I expect the only option is to fix the camera and move the focus ring.

Mark_A
.
A thread of photos from SmartPhones ..
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64212858

mawyatt2002
mawyatt2002 Contributing Member • Posts: 502
Re: For focus stacking, which is better?

It's usually better to keep the camera and lens fixed and change the lens focus for magnifications less than 1X, and fix the focus and move the camera and lens for greater than 1X. Of course there's a big range around 1X that is good either way, and best to just test and see.

The change in perspective is the main issue when stacking is involved.

Best,

-- hide signature --

Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

ken_in_nh Contributing Member • Posts: 900
Re: For focus stacking, which is better?
1

Rik Littlefield, the author of a great stacking program, Zerene, talks about the choice here: https://www.zerenesystems.com/cms/stacker/docs/troubleshooting/ringversusrail

Short summary: It depends.

I've had great luck using the focus motor for stacking with my 100mm macro.

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 16,061
Re: For focus stacking, which is better?

mawyatt2002 wrote:

It's usually better to keep the camera and lens fixed and change the lens focus for magnifications less than 1X, and fix the focus and move the camera and lens for greater than 1X. Of course there's a big range around 1X that is good either way, and best to just test and see.

The change in perspective is the main issue when stacking is involved.

Hi Mike thanks for responding.

So if I am shooting a landscape which will be a lot smaller than 1x I can use the focus ring, and if I am shooting an insect with a macro lens where I am likely to be more than 1x I should use focussing rails?

About change in perspective, I don't fully understand that, but I am aware that each method changes the image a bit and probably differently.

Mark_A
.
A thread of photos from SmartPhones ..
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64212858

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 16,061
Re: For focus stacking, which is better?

ken_in_nh wrote:

Rik Littlefield, the author of a great stacking program, Zerene, talks about the choice here: https://www.zerenesystems.com/cms/stacker/docs/troubleshooting/ringversusrail

Short summary: It depends.

I've had great luck using the focus motor for stacking with my 100mm macro.

Hi Ken,

Thanks for your response. The link is interesting and I had heard of Zerene.

It does seem like it depends.

Well that is OK, at the moment I don't have any software to stack with, I will probably buy Affinity Photo soon and that will enable me to have a go.  I have seen some very nice photos recently achieved with focus stacking so I do want at some point to have a go.

Mark_A
.
A thread of photos from SmartPhones ..
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64212858

mawyatt2002
mawyatt2002 Contributing Member • Posts: 502
Re: For focus stacking, which is better?

Mark_A wrote:

mawyatt2002 wrote:

It's usually better to keep the camera and lens fixed and change the lens focus for magnifications less than 1X, and fix the focus and move the camera and lens for greater than 1X. Of course there's a big range around 1X that is good either way, and best to just test and see.

The change in perspective is the main issue when stacking is involved.

Hi Mike thanks for responding.

So if I am shooting a landscape which will be a lot smaller than 1x I can use the focus ring, and if I am shooting an insect with a macro lens where I am likely to be more than 1x I should use focussing rails?

About change in perspective, I don't fully understand that, but I am aware that each method changes the image a bit and probably differently.

Mark_A
.
A thread of photos from SmartPhones ..
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64212858

Mark,

Check Zerene as Ken mentioned. I use this for stacking, excellent special purpose tool.

Best,

-- hide signature --

Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

Bill Janes Senior Member • Posts: 1,924
Re: Perspective vs Focal Length

mawyatt2002 wrote:

The change in perspective is the main issue when stacking is involved.

+1

Changes in perspective are lessened when one uses a longer focal length macro lens. If possible, I prefer to stack with my 180 mm macro, rather than my 105 and 60 mm lenses. For a given magnification, the depth of field over the subject is the same but the 180 will blur the background more.

-- hide signature --

Bill Janes

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads