Lens Hoods

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Barry Duggan Photography
Barry Duggan Photography Senior Member • Posts: 1,205
Lens Hoods

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

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Steven Seven
Steven Seven Regular Member • Posts: 362
Nope

I never use hoods on anything for the following reasons:

  • They make a camera bulky and visible.
  • It slows me down, because I like to carry my cameras in a small messenger bag, so pulling it in/out is harder with a hood.
  • I do not care about flare with modern lenses. They keep contrast well and even when they flare, the effect is usually beautiful.
  • I do not care about "protection", TBH I can't even imagine what needs to happen to scratch the front element. In 20 years the absolute worst thing I've seen happen to my lenses was a fingerprint.

[edit] I realize that different people have different shooting/handling habits and some are probably more prone to scratching the font element (I have a relative like that) so I kind of see why some may want a hood.

Photobygms
Photobygms Regular Member • Posts: 163
Re: Lens Hoods
1

Never leave without the hoods

we always use hoods,  they actually have kept some of our lenses save.

I rather buy a new hood than having to replace a damaged lens.

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Overrank Senior Member • Posts: 1,964
Re: Lens Hoods

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

I tend to on big zooms, no so much on small primes.

citizenlouie Senior Member • Posts: 1,226
Re: Lens Hoods
4

I use lens hood at all time.  Not for protection like some people say, but for stray light that can lower the contrast.  I use lens hood even indoor and at night (in fact, stray light can be an even worse problem at night).  But you said film, so I don't know how much that would affect film photography, but digital any little thing would cause big issue so I use a lens hood out of habit.

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elmo Senior Member • Posts: 2,913
Yes
2

Flare -- after you've seen the effect of hand-shading a lens enough times, hoods become a no-brainer.

Protection -- I used to have a filter on every lens, until I found that one particular new filter [one of many Hoya HMC UV(0) that I had] was causing a directional jiggle-blur on the entire photo, which could be repeated and tested by rotating the filter. Much as I'd prefer to avoid cleaning expensive lenses, I also realized modern glass -- Canon in particular -- was easier to clean well, than the Hoya filters.

So, the hood is the only lens protection. Do not even use lens caps, most of the time, as long as I can fit the lens with hood in place, into my bags.

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mamallama
mamallama Forum Pro • Posts: 59,310
Re: Lens Hoods

In my 35mm film days I used rubber lens hoods left attached to the lens and folded back when not in use. I only unfolded them taking a picture when the lighting conditions were such to produce flare and reduce contrast.

One of the disadvantages of the old rangefinder cameras was that using lens hoods caused real problems. There were special lens hoods made for rangefinder cameras with hole cutouts that helped (a little)

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Smaug01
Smaug01 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,160
Re: Lens Hoods
3

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

I used to religiously use a UV filter, but never a hood.

Now, I use a hood, but never a UV filter. I wish I had wised up a long time ago. The hood makes a much bigger difference, both in protection of the lens' front element as well as in contrast and flare. (or lack thereof)

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SLN001
SLN001 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,740
Yes
1

I have a strong preference for early rangefinder cameras and lenses. I just prefer the character they impose on the image.

Of course, you have to adjust your processes to account for the eccentricities those lenses introduce.

In the example below I was using both a new (to me) lens and film. The lens is a 1936 uncoated Elmar 3.535 and the film Lomography Color 800.

While I usually use a hood, I went out without one because I didn't have one to fit the lens. After this shot, I corrected that error.

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Canon P, Lomography 800, Leica Elmar 3.5/35.

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elmo Senior Member • Posts: 2,913
Re: Lens Hoods
1

mamallama wrote:

One of the disadvantages of the old rangefinder cameras was that using lens hoods caused real problems. There were special lens hoods made for rangefinder cameras with hole cutouts that helped (a little)

Nah, I think that NOT using hoods on a rangefinder causes real problems. Unlike with an SLR, you may not even see the flare through the viewfinder. And, if you do see it, attempts at hand shading will fail, because you will be hand shading the viewfinder, but, not the taking lens.

You just have to make sure you use the right hood, because, yes, the wrong hood may vignette your photos. And, the vented hoods are used on rangefinders so they do not block a corner of the viewfinder.

I always feel nekkid when using a rangefinder without a hood. I recently got a Konica Auto S2 fixed-lens rangefinder. The nice thing about this camera, is that it has a built-in sliding hood -- huzzah!

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Barry Duggan Photography
OP Barry Duggan Photography Senior Member • Posts: 1,205
Re: Lens Hoods

Thanks for the replies. I noticed my Minolta Md lenses are giving me some flare, and while I actually like this effect, I don't always want it in my images. I have good UV filters attached so I'm good on the protection side of things.

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marc petzold
marc petzold Senior Member • Posts: 1,541
Re: Lens Hoods
1

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

Yes i do. On every Lens. Usually 35mm. Or 35-70mm, or 28-70mm. Or seldom 50mm.

Because i don't want flares on my Film Exposures, or lower contrast from stray Light. I've had a Lens Hood for my 1st SLR, Pentax MX and SMC 50/1.7 Prime into the 80s.

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DenWil
DenWil Veteran Member • Posts: 4,323
Re: Lens Hoods

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

I do not own any black and white 35 mm film SLRs.

All of the medium format lenses are used with lens hoods.

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dw

mamallama
mamallama Forum Pro • Posts: 59,310
Re: Lens Hoods

elmo wrote:

mamallama wrote:

One of the disadvantages of the old rangefinder cameras was that using lens hoods caused real problems. There were special lens hoods made for rangefinder cameras with hole cutouts that helped (a little)

Nah, I think that NOT using hoods on a rangefinder causes real problems. Unlike with an SLR, you may not even see the flare through the viewfinder. And, if you do see it, attempts at hand shading will fail, because you will be hand shading the viewfinder, but, not the taking lens.

You just have to make sure you use the right hood, because, yes, the wrong hood may vignette your photos. And, the vented hoods are used on rangefinders so they do not block a corner of the viewfinder.

Rangefinder cameras pay a heavy price to retain that retro viewfinder that suffers from parallax error, lens and hood blockage and awkward use with zoom lens. That is why there is a market for those $750 auxiliary Leica add-on electronic viewfinders for the well heeled.

I always feel nekkid when using a rangefinder without a hood. I recently got a Konica Auto S2 fixed-lens rangefinder. The nice thing about this camera, is that it has a built-in sliding hood -- huzzah!

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arthur01 Regular Member • Posts: 143
Re: Lens Hoods

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

Yes. Particularly if shooting into the sun.

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Autonerd Senior Member • Posts: 1,736
Re: Lens Hoods

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

Rarely, but  mostly shot with shorter lenses and hoods were not really A Thing back in my formative days. I always used UV lenses but am having second thoughts about that -- I like them for lens protection (one saved a Nikon zoom that took a swan dive off a shelv) but now I sometimes remove them for shooting.

I'm starting to do some longer-lens stuff with a Pentax 70-210 that has a built-in hood. Its retractable so not much good for lens protection but I will experiment with it more.

FWIW I have a hood for my digicam (Sony 6000) 18-55 and only use it if I see glare. It just seems to get in the way.

For the record i think my opinions are born more of habit and ignorance than sense.

Aaron

Tomm111 Senior Member • Posts: 1,116
Depends

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Just curious to see if people use lens hoods on their film cameras, particularly 35mm SLRs.

Some lenses need a hood, most do fine with out them. I use several old Leica lenses their hoods help a little with contrast. The cut out hoods are fine not noticeably blocking the viewfinder. One lens I have requires a hood to hold filters. With the small cut out hoods I don't feel it brings any more attention to the camera. I have one old lens that has to have a shade, a 135 Schneider Retina, made a huge difference in images from the lens. Another where it helps is a Vivitar 90-180 flt field macro zoom. On  both of these I just bought a rubber collapsible telephoto shade. I agree most modern lenses don't need them especially if they are multi coated.

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NCB Senior Member • Posts: 1,694
Rarely

Generally I didn't, and never used filters. The Sigma showed up all the other manufacturers by including hoods with their lenses, so as it was there I used it. Mind you, the lenses I tended to use (non-Sigma) tended to have recessed front elements anyway.

Had a feeling that when a hood was included with a lens, it was right for that lens. But otherwise there were some pretty useless hoods around.

Nigel

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tassienick Senior Member • Posts: 1,424
Re: Yes

SLN001 wrote:

I have a strong preference for early rangefinder cameras and lenses. I just prefer the character they impose on the image.

Of course, you have to adjust your processes to account for the eccentricities those lenses introduce.

In the example below I was using both a new (to me) lens and film. The lens is a 1936 uncoated Elmar 3.535 and the film Lomography Color 800.

While I usually use a hood, I went out without one because I didn't have one to fit the lens. After this shot, I corrected that error.

Apologies if I'm way off the mark, but isn't that a nasty light leak, rather than lens flare?

JohnnyLuddite Senior Member • Posts: 1,463
Re: Lens Hoods
3

I didn't used to, but then did a test with my lenses in different orientations to the sun. Even with nano-coated lenses away from the sun, the histograms showed a slight offset (from the sky I guess), and all the images were improved by changing the black point.

I also figured that even indoors with bounce flash say, enough light enters from the front to affect the images.

So yes, now I mostly do so.

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