How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

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lisaliliiliu New Member • Posts: 3
How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

Leonard Migliore
Leonard Migliore Forum Pro • Posts: 18,082
Well, now
8

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

Dealing with light and shadow is the whole point of photography. Please be more specific about your issues.

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Leonard Migliore

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KCook
KCook Forum Pro • Posts: 18,208
Re: Well, now
3

Leonard Migliore wrote:

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

Dealing with light and shadow is the whole point of photography. Please be more specific about your issues.

That

Plus, all cameras will deal with light and shadow.  This is more a matter of technique than camera selection.

Kelly Cook

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PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 11,100
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

T-he difference between bright-highlights and dark-shadows is referred to as Dynamic-Range (DR).

I am not an expert on that but I think it is safe to say that a larger-sensor (aka FF), and "newer" (aka more expensive), does have a DR advantage.

However, as long as highlights are not blown, Post-Processing (PP) techniques can still be required to lighten (dark) shadows in more difficult situations, and they can also make even smaller sensor cameras sufficient.

And there are other methods like HDR (High Dynamic Range) techniques and Fill-Flash (if close enough).

If you are not familiar w/ HDR, it is a method of shooting 2-3+ exposures that separately optimize both highlights and shadows that then are (software) combined into one-image.

softmarmotte
softmarmotte Senior Member • Posts: 1,221
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?
1

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

T-he difference between bright-highlights and dark-shadows is referred to as Dynamic-Range (DR).

I am not an expert on that but I think it is safe to say that a larger-sensor (aka FF), and "newer" (aka more expensive), does have a DR advantage.

However, as long as highlights are not blown, Post-Processing (PP) techniques can still be required to lighten (dark) shadows in more difficult situations, and they can also make even smaller sensor cameras sufficient.

And there are other methods like HDR (High Dynamic Range) techniques and Fill-Flash (if close enough).

If you are not familiar w/ HDR, it is a method of shooting 2-3+ exposures that separately optimize both highlights and shadows that then are (software) combined into one-image.

HDR or bracketing. Nearly all cameras have the ability to take a bracket of 3-7 photos with ev ranging from .3 upwards. I sue it a lot when dealing with bright skies and shadows. then merge in lightroom

typical example

x 3 bracket at 1 ev with electronic shutter handheld

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D Cox Forum Pro • Posts: 26,745
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?
1

The main thing is to avoid overexposure, which gives blank white areas. If shooting in bright sunshine with deep shadows, you may need to use -1 on the Exposure Compensation control to avoid overexposure -- it depends on how clever the metering is on your camera.

You can always lighten the shadows by using a computer program. You can't do anything about the white patches.

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Sigma fp
D Cox Forum Pro • Posts: 26,745
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

softmarmotte wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

T-he difference between bright-highlights and dark-shadows is referred to as Dynamic-Range (DR).

I am not an expert on that but I think it is safe to say that a larger-sensor (aka FF), and "newer" (aka more expensive), does have a DR advantage.

However, as long as highlights are not blown, Post-Processing (PP) techniques can still be required to lighten (dark) shadows in more difficult situations, and they can also make even smaller sensor cameras sufficient.

And there are other methods like HDR (High Dynamic Range) techniques and Fill-Flash (if close enough).

If you are not familiar w/ HDR, it is a method of shooting 2-3+ exposures that separately optimize both highlights and shadows that then are (software) combined into one-image.

HDR or bracketing. Nearly all cameras have the ability to take a bracket of 3-7 photos with ev ranging from .3 upwards. I sue it a lot when dealing with bright skies and shadows. then merge in lightroom

typical example

x 3 bracket at 1 ev with electronic shutter handheld

Nice photo. Where is it ?

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Sigma fp
D Cox Forum Pro • Posts: 26,745
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

To answer the "too large" question, my opinion is that the Sony A6000 series cameras are a good compromise between sensor size (should be as big as possible) and camera body size (should be small and light).

There is a very big range of sizes and weights of lenses.

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Sigma fp
lehill
lehill Veteran Member • Posts: 5,722
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?
1

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

This is a big question like "How should I prepare food?"

Photographers can deal with light and shadow before, during, and after a photo is taken. But I think you're asking about cameras. You're right, cameras with larger sensors are more capable to deal with extremes in light and shadow (dynamic range).

A lot of us here will shoot in raw format, instead of JPEG, then edit the raw file with image editing software, then make our own JPEGs. Raw files are better than JPEG for light and shadow. Check and see if the camera you have right now will shoot in raw.

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softmarmotte
softmarmotte Senior Member • Posts: 1,221
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

Ooidonk castle near Deinze in Belgium

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Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,548
Please tell us...
1

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

Tell us a bit about yourself and what you want to photograph. Do you have any experience in photography? If so, have you run across specific problems that you'd like to solve? If you do have a few problematic photos, maybe you could upload them here so that we can analyze what might be wrong with them.

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D Cox Forum Pro • Posts: 26,745
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

softmarmotte wrote:

Ooidonk castle near Deinze in Belgium

Thanks.

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Sigma fp
graybalanced Veteran Member • Posts: 6,751
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?
3

Light and shadow is about the choices you make about dynamic range and contrast control, no matter what camera. For example if you are photographing in the sun so there is too much contrast, you can make many choices like add flash, add reflector, or have subject step into the shade. Those will all work with any camera, large or small.

If you want to learn about this, read a book or watch a video about lighting techniques for photography or video.

You cannot solve these problems by buying the most expensive or largest camera. You must know what to do with the camera, in terms of light control in your scene.

Thandiwe Tsotetsi New Member • Posts: 2
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

I am no expert but I think you should consider using f/8 at 1/250 of a second and place your iso on a 100 (adjust your shutterspeed according to your light meter.)

If your normal exposure is f/8 then you will shoot at f/8, f/5.8 and f/11 with the same shutter speed. In order to achieve light and shadow images consider your 1.light direction; where it comes from in relationship to your subject. 2. The intensity the brightness of the light source in relationship to your subject. 3. Your contrast, how bold and strong or soft and subtle they are. 4. The hardness whether it is soft or hard edges and lastly the color (is there a cast to the light.)

skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 5,501
Re: How to deal with light and shadow in shooting?

lisaliliiliu wrote:

How to deal with light and shadow in shooting, which camera is more suitable, too large camera is very difficult to carry.

Hi Iisalililiu, still here?

A good way to deal with hi-lights and shadows, is to get a camera with an electronic viewfinder. Then learn how to use zebras (set to 100%), use exposure compensation, and use the ETTR (Expose To The Right) technique to adjust for maximum brightness without over exposing (clipping) the highlights. (This cannot be done using a DSLR with an optical viewfinder.)  Alternatively, instead of adjusting exposure compensation, one can adjust aperture and/or shutter speed manually to also use the ETTR technique.

Then in your graphics editing program, you can raise the shadows while still retaining detail in the highlights for a nicely exposed picture.

If the dynamic range of the the scene is too great (when the ETTR technique above is done but the shadows get clipped and lose detail), then you can take bracketed shots and combine them in post processing using HDR (high dynamic range) software. That will preserve both shadows and highlights and combine them into one picture.

How do you know whether the shadows will be clipped? Display the histogram overlay in the viewfinder (along with the zebras) and see if the histogram mountain is clipped on the left side. Experience will make judgement better.

Finally, the bigger the sensor (with appropriate resolution), the more dynamic range can be captured. A good compromise at the low end is a camera with a 1 inch sensor. Better is a micro four thirds sensor. Better yet, some cameras with APSC or full frame size sensors have electronic viewfinders. But cameras with 1" sensors can have longer optical zoom range without having to change lenses so are a good compromise if one does not want to carry and change lenses.

Sky

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