Movie Trivia Question

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(unknown member) Regular Member • Posts: 463
Movie Trivia Question

Just got finished with Rear Window.    James Stewart in the Hitchcock classic.    The remainder of the cast?   ALL top names or top character actors.

But my question?

What CAMERA did Stewart use?    It looked like an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future.     Pentax?

Michael Benveniste
Michael Benveniste Veteran Member • Posts: 5,175
Re: Movie Trivia Question
5

leonski wrote:

Just got finished with Rear Window. James Stewart in the Hitchcock classic. The remainder of the cast? ALL top names or top character actors.

But my question?

What CAMERA did Stewart use? It looked like an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future. Pentax?

An Exakta VX Ihagee Dresden with a Kilfitt 400mm lens. Want your own?

https://www.ebay.com/b/Exakta-Vintage-SLR-Cameras/11720/bn_154995

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kilfitt-5-6-400-Fern-Kilar-M39-LTM-vintage-lens-f-400mm/174222323136

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OP (unknown member) Regular Member • Posts: 463
Re: Movie Trivia Question

I'd like a Still Frame capture from the movie.

That POINTY finder looks like you could hurt yourself on it!

Stewart played a press / news photographer.    Probably means he was shooting Tri-X and pusing it at that.

Michael Benveniste
Michael Benveniste Veteran Member • Posts: 5,175
Re: Movie Trivia Question
1

leonski wrote:

I'd like a Still Frame capture from the movie.

You can see a couple here, including an Exacta advertisement which touted its use.

http://www.imagecolorado.com/photo-articles/they-dont-make-them-like-they-used-to/

https://i2.wp.com/www.imagecolorado.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Exakta-Brochure.jpg

Stewart played a press / news photographer. Probably means he was shooting Tri-X and pushing it at that.

Both "Rear Window" and Tri-X in 35mm were introduced in 1954, but Hitchcock started filming the movie in 1953, so there's a bit of a time issue there.

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Tom Axford Veteran Member • Posts: 7,225
Re: Movie Trivia Question

leonski wrote:

Just got finished with Rear Window. James Stewart in the Hitchcock classic. The remainder of the cast? ALL top names or top character actors.

But my question?

What CAMERA did Stewart use? It looked like an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future. Pentax?

The Exakta Varex was the ultimate modular camera.  The pentaprism viewfinder could be exchanged with a waist-level viewfinder.  The ground glass screen could be replaced by any of a whole variety of different screens for scientific use.

It was a great camera for general photography, but it was also ideal for connecting up to a microscope or a telescope or for a variety of other scientific uses.  And it was as solid as a tank (and nearly as heavy).

OP (unknown member) Regular Member • Posts: 463
Re: Movie Trivia Question
1

I'd almost expect a press photog of 1952 /53 to still be using a Speed Graphic!

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 12,870
Re: Movie Trivia Question

Michael Benveniste
Michael Benveniste Veteran Member • Posts: 5,175
Re: Movie Trivia Question
1

leonski wrote:

I'd almost expect a press photog of 1952 /53 to still be using a Speed Graphic!

And well they might.  They might also have used a Leica, a Rolleiflex, or even a rangefinder from one of those Japanese upstarts like Nikon and Canon.

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 12,870
Re: Movie Trivia Question

leonski wrote:

I'd almost expect a press photog of 1952 /53 to still be using a Speed Graphic!

Jeff had his leg broken taking an action shot at a car race.

Even then I don't think they used Speed Graphic (nevermind the name...) for that.

Unagi Shiruba Regular Member • Posts: 237
Re: Movie Trivia Question

Tom Axford wrote:

leonski wrote:

Just got finished with Rear Window. James Stewart in the Hitchcock classic. The remainder of the cast? ALL top names or top character actors.

But my question?

What CAMERA did Stewart use? It looked like an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future. Pentax?

The Exakta Varex was the ultimate modular camera. The pentaprism viewfinder could be exchanged with a waist-level viewfinder. The ground glass screen could be replaced by any of a whole variety of different screens for scientific use.

just like a Nikon F, F2, F3, F4, and maybe the F5. And you could add motor drives and long roll backs as well.

It was a great camera for general photography, but it was also ideal for connecting up to a microscope or a telescope or for a variety of other scientific uses. And it was as solid as a tank (and nearly as heavy).

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 12,870
Re: Movie Trivia Question

Unagi Shiruba wrote:

Tom Axford wrote:

leonski wrote:

Just got finished with Rear Window. James Stewart in the Hitchcock classic. The remainder of the cast? ALL top names or top character actors.

But my question?

What CAMERA did Stewart use? It looked like an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future. Pentax?

The Exakta Varex was the ultimate modular camera. The pentaprism viewfinder could be exchanged with a waist-level viewfinder. The ground glass screen could be replaced by any of a whole variety of different screens for scientific use.

just like a Nikon F, F2, F3, F4, and maybe the F5. And you could add motor drives and long roll backs as well.

It was a great camera for general photography, but it was also ideal for connecting up to a microscope or a telescope or for a variety of other scientific uses. And it was as solid as a tank (and nearly as heavy).

yes but the Varex was out 9 years before the Nikon F.

Son of Thunder
Son of Thunder Contributing Member • Posts: 646
Re: Movie Trivia Question

To people who complain about photography price being to high the ad for that camera in 1954 was between 269.00 and 370.00 depending on lens. Minimum wage was .75 cent a hour. Median income was 4200.00. That .75 in today dollar in 7.16 an hour.

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Tom Axford Veteran Member • Posts: 7,225
Re: Movie Trivia Question

FrancoD wrote:

Unagi Shiruba wrote:

Tom Axford wrote:

leonski wrote:

Just got finished with Rear Window. James Stewart in the Hitchcock classic. The remainder of the cast? ALL top names or top character actors.

But my question?

What CAMERA did Stewart use? It looked like an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future. Pentax?

The Exakta Varex was the ultimate modular camera. The pentaprism viewfinder could be exchanged with a waist-level viewfinder. The ground glass screen could be replaced by any of a whole variety of different screens for scientific use.

just like a Nikon F, F2, F3, F4, and maybe the F5. And you could add motor drives and long roll backs as well.

It was a great camera for general photography, but it was also ideal for connecting up to a microscope or a telescope or for a variety of other scientific uses. And it was as solid as a tank (and nearly as heavy).

yes but the Varex was out 9 years before the Nikon F.

And the model that preceded the Varex was the first 35mm SLR.

FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 12,870
Re: Movie Trivia Question
1

Son of Thunder wrote:

To people who complain about photography price being to high the ad for that camera in 1954 was between 269.00 and 370.00 depending on lens. Minimum wage was .75 cent a hour. Median income was 4200.00. That .75 in today dollar in 7.16 an hour.

According to the Inflation Calculator, $300 then is about $3000 now.

The good old days....

Guy Parsons
Guy Parsons Forum Pro • Posts: 34,820
Re: Movie Trivia Question

Tom Axford wrote:

an SLR but not the Nikon F which was still 4 or 5 years in the future. Pentax?

The Exakta Varex was the ultimate modular camera. The pentaprism viewfinder could be exchanged with a waist-level viewfinder. The ground glass screen could be replaced by any of a whole variety of different screens for scientific use.

It was a great camera for general photography, but it was also ideal for connecting up to a microscope or a telescope or for a variety of other scientific uses. And it was as solid as a tank (and nearly as heavy).

Some time way back last century I bought a microscope-camera adapter to suit the tube on my monocular lab microscope. It was cheap on a toss-out table at a big camera store, too cheap and way too well made to pass it by.

Turned out it attached to Exakta so wasn't much use for my then Minolta and later Pentax mount Ricoh or later Nikon. But when M4/3 came along I revived it and managed to get an Exakta-M4/3 adapter from England so could now start to use it. Only took about 30 or 40 years to finally make use of the gadget.

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Michael Benveniste
Michael Benveniste Veteran Member • Posts: 5,175
Re: Movie Trivia Question

Son of Thunder wrote:

To people who complain about photography price being to high the ad for that camera in 1954 was between 269.00 and 370.00 depending on lens. Minimum wage was .75 cent a hour. Median income was 4200.00. That .75 in today dollar in 7.16 an hour.

Here is an issue of Pop Photo from 1956, including many ads. The Kilfitt lens is advertised at $239.00 on page 54, and there's a full page ad from Exacta on page 27.

https://books.google.com/books?id=gV4zAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

When making such comparisons, though, it's worth nothing a couple of things. First is the cost of film, processing, and even flashbulbs. An 8x10" print could easily cost $2-3.

Second, then as now, camera gear was available at a wide variety of price points. An Exacta VX would have been a high-end camera -- A Leica M3 with 50mm f/3.5 Elmar was also only about $350. But a basic consumer camera like a Brownie Hawkeye sold for $7 (with flash).

While I still shoot film and enjoy using "yestertech," when it comes to photographic options, I'm glad to be "living in the future."

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Son of Thunder
Son of Thunder Contributing Member • Posts: 646
Re: Movie Trivia Question
1

Michael Benveniste wrote:

Son of Thunder wrote:

To people who complain about photography price being to high the ad for that camera in 1954 was between 269.00 and 370.00 depending on lens. Minimum wage was .75 cent a hour. Median income was 4200.00. That .75 in today dollar in 7.16 an hour.

Here is an issue of Pop Photo from 1956, including many ads. The Kilfitt lens is advertised at $239.00 on page 54, and there's a full page ad from Exacta on page 27.

https://books.google.com/books?id=gV4zAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

When making such comparisons, though, it's worth nothing a couple of things. First is the cost of film, processing, and even flashbulbs. An 8x10" print could easily cost $2-3.

Second, then as now, camera gear was available at a wide variety of price points. An Exacta VX would have been a high-end camera -- A Leica M3 with 50mm f/3.5 Elmar was also only about $350. But a basic consumer camera like a Brownie Hawkeye sold for $7 (with flash).

While I still shoot film and enjoy using "yestertech," when it comes to photographic options, I'm glad to be "living in the future."

350 for that leica is like 3500.  today

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mount evans
mount evans Regular Member • Posts: 344
Re: Movie Trivia Question

Another movie from the same time period that may be of interest is Roman Holiday.  Audrey Hepburn plays the princess of an unnamed country, Gregory Peck a journalist (I get the impression that he is working abroad because he is not considered very reliable) and a young Eddie Albert a freelance photographer, what we today would consider a paparazzi.  We get to see him use a variety of cameras (including one concealed in a cigarette lighter--he is amazed to get a decent image from such a small negative) and risk his life to get some unusual shots as the princess plays hooky from her responsibilities for a couple days.  The ending is unlike modern movies of this sort--the princess goes back to her duties, the journalist sits on the story, the photographer makes a gift of the photos to the princess, no romantic ending for anybody.

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 12,870
Re: Movie Trivia Question

mount evans wrote:

Another movie from the same time period that may be of interest is Roman Holiday. Audrey Hepburn plays the princess of an unnamed country, Gregory Peck a journalist (I get the impression that he is working abroad because he is not considered very reliable) and a young Eddie Albert a freelance photographer, what we today would consider a paparazzi.

Papparazzo was the surname of the photographer in the Fellini film La Dolce Vita.

(Fellini made that name up using the sound that a mosquito makes) .

BTW, papparazzo for one , papparazzi for a scourge of them .

We get to see him use a variety of cameras (including one concealed in a cigarette lighter--he is amazed to get a decent image from such a small negative)

That was the Echo 8 , made in Japan by Suzuki Optical in 1951. The film created a demand for it so susuki made a less expensive version called Camera Lite Model B. The Echo sold for $20 in 1954. ($200 now)

BTW, the format was called 8mm but the frame size was 6x6mm (according to the Minori film )

mount evans
mount evans Regular Member • Posts: 344
Re: Movie Trivia Question

FrancoD wrote:

Papparazzo was the surname of the photographer in the Fellini film La Dolce Vita.

(Fellini made that name up using the sound that a mosquito makes) .

BTW, papparazzo for one , papparazzi for a scourge of them .

And here I just assumed that the name had something to do with "paper."

That was the Echo 8 , made in Japan by Suzuki Optical in 1951. The film created a demand for it so susuki made a less expensive version called Camera Lite Model B. The Echo sold for $20 in 1954. ($200 now)

BTW, the format was called 8mm but the frame size was 6x6mm (according to the Minori film )

Dare I ask what the I/B switch is selecting?  Body vs. Lens stabilization?

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