Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions

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alcelc
alcelc Forum Pro • Posts: 13,616
+1
2

AdamT wrote:

Sranang Boi wrote:

That's why the 14-140mm has a switch to disable the I.S.

it doesn`t stop the shock because the system still has to centralise and suspend the IS element - same for Nikon`s VR and shock issues in certain cameras there too

the only way out is E-Shutter with that lens and the Shocky cameras, I`ve been through all this with the GX7 ..

And also the EFCS...

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Albert
** Please feel free to download the original image I posted here and edit it as you like **

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OutsideTheMatrix
OutsideTheMatrix Senior Member • Posts: 6,288
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions

dbateman wrote:

OutsideTheMatrix wrote:

sensitivity to "invisible light" as it's called is down to the UV/IR blockers that are used over the CCD, not usually a characteristic of the lens itself.

Actually quite wrong with your assumption here. The glass used will have significant impact on light transmission. Also the coatings used on the elements. Then hot spots can occur depending on reflections within the lens and the quality of the specific filter you use. This can all be seen even with a leaky Olympus camera that allows quite a bit of IR through the blocking glass.

A full spectrum converted camera, like I have will show you more obviously. But you maybe surprised that a off the shelf EM1mk1 is quite sensitive to IR and will also show you the contrast and sharpness difference between lenses.

I am looking for a weather sealed all purpose lens also capable of IR. It seems to be between the Panasonic 12-60mm f3.5/5.6 or Panasonic 14-140mm f3.5/5.6. The Olympus 14-42mm R2 is great for IR and even UV. But its not sealed and has a limited range. This one I own and have played with. The Olympus 14-54mm mk1 I also own and is great for IR. But with the death of Olympus will need a m43rds weather sealed lens as it only focuses fast on EM1 bodies and I want more m43rds choices going forward.

well with UV there is more of an impact because quartz lenses are better for passing light and they are quite rare and expensive, but as far as IR is concerned, isn't the better way to go about it to have a full spectrum conversion done?

Wow, I am surprised by what you mentioned with the EM1Mk1......Olympus is known to use rather strong blockers.  Do you think other Oly cameras like the EM10Mk2 are just as sensitive?  I have been using my Fuji HS50 for IR since it is rather sensitive to both IR and UV....even at the long 1000mm EFL tele end, it can autofocus at tele quite easily during the day.  I measured only a -6.7 stop light loss when using a B+W 072 filter on that camera, so it has become my one stop shop for false color IR photography.

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In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.
-Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1961

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OP dbateman Contributing Member • Posts: 531
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions
2

OutsideTheMatrix wrote:

dbateman wrote:

OutsideTheMatrix wrote:

sensitivity to "invisible light" as it's called is down to the UV/IR blockers that are used over the CCD, not usually a characteristic of the lens itself.

Actually quite wrong with your assumption here. The glass used will have significant impact on light transmission. Also the coatings used on the elements. Then hot spots can occur depending on reflections within the lens and the quality of the specific filter you use. This can all be seen even with a leaky Olympus camera that allows quite a bit of IR through the blocking glass.

A full spectrum converted camera, like I have will show you more obviously. But you maybe surprised that a off the shelf EM1mk1 is quite sensitive to IR and will also show you the contrast and sharpness difference between lenses.

I am looking for a weather sealed all purpose lens also capable of IR. It seems to be between the Panasonic 12-60mm f3.5/5.6 or Panasonic 14-140mm f3.5/5.6. The Olympus 14-42mm R2 is great for IR and even UV. But its not sealed and has a limited range. This one I own and have played with. The Olympus 14-54mm mk1 I also own and is great for IR. But with the death of Olympus will need a m43rds weather sealed lens as it only focuses fast on EM1 bodies and I want more m43rds choices going forward.

well with UV there is more of an impact because quartz lenses are better for passing light and they are quite rare and expensive, but as far as IR is concerned, isn't the better way to go about it to have a full spectrum conversion done?

Wow, I am surprised by what you mentioned with the EM1Mk1......Olympus is known to use rather strong blockers. Do you think other Oly cameras like the EM10Mk2 are just as sensitive? I have been using my Fuji HS50 for IR since it is rather sensitive to both IR and UV....even at the long 1000mm EFL tele end, it can autofocus at tele quite easily during the day. I measured only a -6.7 stop light loss when using a B+W 072 filter on that camera, so it has become my one stop shop for false color IR photography.

Actually quite the opposite. Olympus cameras are known to have really weak UV and IR blocking. Panasonic has strong UV and IR blocking.

My stock Em1 Mk1 was sensitive to UV and IR. My stock Em5mk2 is 1/3 less sensitive to UV than my stock EM1 was before full spectrum conversion.

My GM5 is at least 5 stops less sensitive to UV than my stock Em5mk2. Also at least 1 stop less sensitive to IR. I would have to look up the exact numbers from my last test.

I haven't used the Em10 series, so can't comment. But assume it to be similar to Em5's. As similar sensor. The Panasonic MN34230 in the Em1mk1 is very UV sensitive.

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OutsideTheMatrix
OutsideTheMatrix Senior Member • Posts: 6,288
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions

dbateman wrote:

OutsideTheMatrix wrote:

dbateman wrote:

OutsideTheMatrix wrote:

sensitivity to "invisible light" as it's called is down to the UV/IR blockers that are used over the CCD, not usually a characteristic of the lens itself.

Actually quite wrong with your assumption here. The glass used will have significant impact on light transmission. Also the coatings used on the elements. Then hot spots can occur depending on reflections within the lens and the quality of the specific filter you use. This can all be seen even with a leaky Olympus camera that allows quite a bit of IR through the blocking glass.

A full spectrum converted camera, like I have will show you more obviously. But you maybe surprised that a off the shelf EM1mk1 is quite sensitive to IR and will also show you the contrast and sharpness difference between lenses.

I am looking for a weather sealed all purpose lens also capable of IR. It seems to be between the Panasonic 12-60mm f3.5/5.6 or Panasonic 14-140mm f3.5/5.6. The Olympus 14-42mm R2 is great for IR and even UV. But its not sealed and has a limited range. This one I own and have played with. The Olympus 14-54mm mk1 I also own and is great for IR. But with the death of Olympus will need a m43rds weather sealed lens as it only focuses fast on EM1 bodies and I want more m43rds choices going forward.

well with UV there is more of an impact because quartz lenses are better for passing light and they are quite rare and expensive, but as far as IR is concerned, isn't the better way to go about it to have a full spectrum conversion done?

Wow, I am surprised by what you mentioned with the EM1Mk1......Olympus is known to use rather strong blockers. Do you think other Oly cameras like the EM10Mk2 are just as sensitive? I have been using my Fuji HS50 for IR since it is rather sensitive to both IR and UV....even at the long 1000mm EFL tele end, it can autofocus at tele quite easily during the day. I measured only a -6.7 stop light loss when using a B+W 072 filter on that camera, so it has become my one stop shop for false color IR photography.

Actually quite the opposite. Olympus cameras are known to have really weak UV and IR blocking. Panasonic has strong UV and IR blocking.

My stock Em1 Mk1 was sensitive to UV and IR. My stock Em5mk2 is 1/3 less sensitive to UV than my stock EM1 was before full spectrum conversion.

My GM5 is at least 5 stops less sensitive to UV than my stock Em5mk2. Also at least 1 stop less sensitive to IR. I would have to look up the exact numbers from my last test.

I haven't used the Em10 series, so can't comment. But assume it to be similar to Em5's. As similar sensor. The Panasonic MN34230 in the Em1mk1 is very UV sensitive.

weird thing is with Olympus cameras I get this really strong red tint I cant seem to get rid of even with a WB adjustment, hopefully the newer cameras deal with that better (the one I used was an EPL6).  On the Fuji you get a different look- much finer color gradients instead of just bright red (it looks more like a dusky pink.)

I want to go test my 58mm filter now, are any of the cameras you listed within about 7 stops difference with the IR filter on the lens?

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In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.
-Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1961

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OP dbateman Contributing Member • Posts: 531
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions

Do you have the 14-42mm R2 lens?

I know that is good for uv and IR.  With a setup ring mount your IR filter to your em10.

Then take a custom WB off grass. That will give you a better WB. If that fails drop the CWB setting to 2000K. Around that setting os ideal for IR.

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OutsideTheMatrix
OutsideTheMatrix Senior Member • Posts: 6,288
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions

dbateman wrote:

Do you have the 14-42mm R2 lens?

I know that is good for uv and IR. With a setup ring mount your IR filter to your em10.

Then take a custom WB off grass. That will give you a better WB. If that fails drop the CWB setting to 2000K. Around that setting os ideal for IR.

Yes, I have all three "kit" lenses....was thinking of adding the 9-18 for ultrawide but have heard it is not so sharp.

I have a 40.5mm set up ring on it and a 40.5mm IR filter I used to use on my old C-7070.

I'll try both the grass and 2000K- nice to see Olympus offers a white balance temp this "cold"! Many dont.

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In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.
-Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1961

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Emsquared Forum Member • Posts: 64
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions
1

The power OIS of the newer black ones is better than the mega OIS of the old grey one. I have both. The new model is light and tiny. An amazing kit lens.

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SterlingBjorndahl Senior Member • Posts: 2,192
Re: Question about Panasonic 14-140mm versions

TomFid wrote:

It was probably the first decent superzoom on any mount (except perhaps for the monstrous Canon L).

Also the original 4/3 Pana-Leica 14-150, truly a "bag full of primes".

Sterling
--
Lens Grit

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