furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

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Andreascy
Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Hello recently i made some photos of furniture and i have trouble to get the correct/ real color of the furniture. Even what i see there or what i took with my camera it seems that its affecting by the floor or flash or light etc.

those 2 photos are the example. images is out of the cameras jpeg. , it seems that there is magenta and yellow cast and some blue cast also.  I used automatic WB on the camera.

i tried in lightroom but with so many reflections i cant be sure what is the correct color of the bed.  and furniture.

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Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,940
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.
4

Don't use auto white balance. Set your white balance to "flash" and then have a neutral target in the scene as a check.

Are there any other light sources in the scene? It looks like there is bluish light coming from a window. To do this sort of thing well, you need to control *all* of the lighting.

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BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,726
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Andreascy wrote:

Hello recently i made some photos of furniture and i have trouble to get the correct/ real color of the furniture. Even what i see there or what i took with my camera it seems that its affecting by the floor or flash or light etc.

those 2 photos are the example. images is out of the cameras jpeg. , it seems that there is magenta and yellow cast and some blue cast also. I used automatic WB on the camera.

i tried in lightroom but with so many reflections i cant be sure what is the correct color of the bed. and furniture.

With my Panasonic, I need to use Manual Exposure mode if I want to get the scene more neutral with flash. In other modes, it reacts more like fill. The auto white balance seems to work better in Manual mode and I can control the shutter speed and flash power separately.

Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Mark Scott Abeln wrote:

Don't use auto white balance. Set your white balance to "flash" and then have a neutral target in the scene as a check.

Are there any other light sources in the scene? It looks like there is bluish light coming from a window. To do this sort of thing well, you need to control *all* of the lighting.

Thank you for answering  me.

Yes in the scene there was multiple lights. yes was one fluorescent big light and yes exactly behind me a window with natural light, and i used to flash lights also. on the lef side was a flash with small flash sphere reflector and in the right was an octabox reflector.The first time i tried this, i used a white balance filter and take a custom WB. the Custom white balance was with flashes mixes with the avaliable light. but i notice that this not work and the images coming out with a pink cast. probably because the  WB filter is taking the reading very close to the lens but the light was much different in the furniture.

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Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,940
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.
1

Andreascy wrote:

Yes in the scene there was multiple lights. yes was one fluorescent big light and yes exactly behind me a window with natural light, and i used to flash lights also. on the lef side was a flash with small flash sphere reflector and in the right was an octabox reflector.The first time i tried this, i used a white balance filter and take a custom WB. the Custom white balance was with flashes mixes with the avaliable light. but i notice that this not work and the images coming out with a pink cast. probably because the WB filter is taking the reading very close to the lens but the light was much different in the furniture.

There is no one white balance that will work for all of the lighting in the scene, since each light source will have a greater or lesser contribution which varies across the scene.

What pros do is to use only one kind of lighting so that the color of the light is uniform. Get one or two additional flashes. However, be aware that different power levels of the flash may alter the coloration.

Alternatively, if the color properties of all the lighting types are known, then gels can be used to match them. This can be done rather inexpensively with gels for flashes. Cinematographers may put gels over windows to match the lighting, but that can be expensive.

I would avoid fluorescent and common LED bulbs for this kind of work, unless they have been specifically vetted for photography.

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geru Senior Member • Posts: 1,076
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

I assume when you refer to using flash it is speedlights?

Your settings are allowing quite a lot of ambient light into the scene which is a major part of the WB problem.

Set the WB to flash or even better use Kelvin if your camera is equipped with that as an option.

To cut the ambient raise your shutter speed to the camera's sync speed and then adjust the aperture to rid the scene of the ambient light ( for example TV - 200 and Av- F/10 or shut down even more) The EVF or the monitor should be black or nearly black. Shoot the speedlights in manual and adjust the power of the flash to get proper lighting. Of course you could just turn off the lights to achieve the same results.

Why the light modifyers? All their doing is robbing you of at least a stop of light . Mount the flashes on a stand and bounce of a wall or ceiling if that can't be done use a whiteboard or the white or silver disk from a 5 in 1 reflector set and bounce the flash off of those.

It may be that you're going to have to use more powerful lights. If that were the case I'd rent before purchasing unless of course you're going to be doing something like this on a permanent basis.

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Bernie3 Regular Member • Posts: 171
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

I agree with others, to get it right in camera, the light needs to be controlled. Several ways have been mentioned. Alternately the undesirable/ hard way to deal with this is in post processing. For example, image available upon request, per DPR guidelines.

Bernie

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Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

geru wrote:

I assume when you refer to using flash it is speedlights?

Your settings are allowing quite a lot of ambient light into the scene which is a major part of the WB problem.

Set the WB to flash or even better use Kelvin if your camera is equipped with that as an option.

To cut the ambient raise your shutter speed to the camera's sync speed and then adjust the aperture to rid the scene of the ambient light ( for example TV - 200 and Av- F/10 or shut down even more) The EVF or the monitor should be black or nearly black. Shoot the speedlights in manual and adjust the power of the flash to get proper lighting. Of course you could just turn off the lights to achieve the same results.

Why the light modifyers? All their doing is robbing you of at least a stop of light . Mount the flashes on a stand and bounce of a wall or ceiling if that can't be done use a whiteboard or the white or silver disk from a 5 in 1 reflector set and bounce the flash off of those.

It may be that you're going to have to use more powerful lights. If that were the case I'd rent before purchasing unless of course you're going to be doing something like this on a permanent basis.

Thank you very much for the detailed informations.

So as i understand you the problem was the existing lightring condtion and to mix this with the speedlights ( yes)

So you suggestion is to stop the  ambient light by this way , but then i think that the power of speedlights will be not enough for this. IN the scene is not a room. is a showroom. so i had to use softbox so i can send the light to the bed. I tried without softbox with just a simple relfector and the light was not powerful enough even if i use a tripod and longer shutter speed.

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Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Mark Scott Abeln wrote:

Andreascy wrote:

Yes in the scene there was multiple lights. yes was one fluorescent big light and yes exactly behind me a window with natural light, and i used to flash lights also. on the lef side was a flash with small flash sphere reflector and in the right was an octabox reflector.The first time i tried this, i used a white balance filter and take a custom WB. the Custom white balance was with flashes mixes with the avaliable light. but i notice that this not work and the images coming out with a pink cast. probably because the WB filter is taking the reading very close to the lens but the light was much different in the furniture.

There is no one white balance that will work for all of the lighting in the scene, since each light source will have a greater or lesser contribution which varies across the scene.

What pros do is to use only one kind of lighting so that the color of the light is uniform. Get one or two additional flashes. However, be aware that different power levels of the flash may alter the coloration.

Alternatively, if the color properties of all the lighting types are known, then gels can be used to match them. This can be done rather inexpensively with gels for flashes. Cinematographers may put gels over windows to match the lighting, but that can be expensive.

I would avoid fluorescent and common LED bulbs for this kind of work, unless they have been specifically vetted for photography.

hello. thank you for answering me . yes it seems that the mix lighting condition make the things like this.  So  when shooting  in places like this i have to manage to have only one light . or to much the color flash filter with the existing light. i have another question. Is there possibility to flash to much with existing lighting? lets say if the  lighting condition is just a window without a a soft light coming inside. is it possible this light to much the flash light? and if not how i will understand what color filter exactly i will use?

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Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,940
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Andreascy wrote:

hello. thank you for answering me . yes it seems that the mix lighting condition make the things like this. So when shooting in places like this i have to manage to have only one light . or to much the color flash filter with the existing light. i have another question. Is there possibility to flash to much with existing lighting? lets say if the lighting condition is just a window without a a soft light coming inside. is it possible this light to much the flash light? and if not how i will understand what color filter exactly i will use?

Flashes can often overpower any lighting.

It’s easy to get a gel a flash for incandescent or fluorescent lights. But can you just turn off the other lights, at least briefly?

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Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Yes. I could turn off the lights i tried it but it was almost completely dark and i couldn't focus. I think flash have small modeling light? i forgot about this. What about that i have 3 different flashes? The one is simple- manual the other 2 is electronic. Using The manual flash with the electronic will result different light so not good results?

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Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,940
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Andreascy wrote:

Yes. I could turn off the lights i tried it but it was almost completely dark and i couldn't focus.

I would manually focus before turning off the lights. Sometimes I use a small pocket flashlight for focusing.

I think flash have small modeling light?

Studio strobes often do. My compact flashes do not.

i forgot about this. What about that i have 3 different flashes? The one is simple- manual the other 2 is electronic. Using The manual flash with the electronic will result different light so not good results?

There is color temperature variation between flash models and particularly when you adjust for power output, and if I recall properly, the problem is worse at lowest power settings. However, I don't think the difference would be all that significant, and won't be as great as the other light sources.

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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 5,596
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Andreascy wrote:

Hello recently i made some photos of furniture and i have trouble to get the correct/ real color of the furniture. Even what i see there or what i took with my camera it seems that its affecting by the floor or flash or light etc.

those 2 photos are the example. images is out of the cameras jpeg. , it seems that there is magenta and yellow cast and some blue cast also. I used automatic WB on the camera.

i tried in lightroom but with so many reflections i cant be sure what is the correct color of the bed. and furniture.

From reading your other posts, there are 3 light sources:

  1. fluorescent,
  2. indirect sunlight through windows,
  3. your external flash setup.

Also that turning off the fluorescent room lights reduces the lighting too much.

My suggestions are:

LIGHTING:

  1. Take your pictures after sunset. That way you eliminate the indirect sunlight.
  2. Put gels on your external flash units to match the fluorescent lighting. That can get complicated since the color temperature of fluorescent lighting can vary. But start off with standard gels for fluorescent lighting.
  3. Now the light from your flash units will match the fluorescent room lighting so your mixed lighting problem is solved.
  4. Be sure your shutter speed is 1/50 second or slower (50 Hz since you live in Cyprus) so that your shutter is open for one entire cycle of the fluorescent pulses (which you can't see by eye). I see that your shutter speed for the pictures you posted are much slower than 1/50 second so you're fine there.

WHITE BALANCE:

  1. Put something white in the scene. A white card or even a white sheet will do. It does not have to be perfect as long as it is white. Don't spread the sheet over the whole bed. Just use a folded up sheet. You want to get exposures based on the scene you will be shooting, not on a large white sheet.
  2. Put the card or folded sheet on the most important thing (the bed for your shots).
  3. Take some sample pictures at different exposures. They will be used to get proper white balance in post processing.
  4. Now remove the white card/sheet and take several pictures at different exposures so you will get at least one with good exposure.
  5. Now in post processing, set the white balance using a well exposed picture with the white card/sheet.
  6. Transfer the attributes of that test picture to your well exposed picture without the white card/sheet.

Give this a try and see if it helps. It should.
Sky

Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Thank you very much for the answer. You help me so much to improve my knowledge. You are absolutely right about lighting. I couldn't imagine that mixing the light was the problem for this strange color casts in the photos. It took me very long time to improveaimprove thebthe imagesiimages in and Photoshop.  The all preperation needs time and patience but its worth a lot. So the important thing  i must remember it needed only   one light temperature..  So the 50 hz indicate a lamp light pulse? So i will remember if there is a lamp light and i will use this light for matching the flash it has to be 1/50 and less. I have a few questions about this situation. (1) . What will happen if i use my camera in shutter speed more than 1/50 with the existing lamp with or without flash? (2) how i will understand if the specific gel i used is the one that matches with the existing lamp light. I mean i have to  view the image in my camera screen and check if there is a noticeable color cast? (3) in this scene plain white was the walls and the mattress, is it necessary to use a white card if the is a white on the scene? Like walls and matress? (4). Why not to use grey card, what the difference of white card and grey card for taking the wb correctly in this situation. (5). I have a  wb filter that you place it front of the lens and you can take the wb reading. I guess this will work in a different lighting situation, for example outside when i want to shoot a landscape. But in this situation because the light is different front of the lens and different in the beds so for accurate results  the reading have to be taken with the  light fall to te subject.(6) On this scene i noticed different colors. Blue on the mattress, magenta- pink in the bed and walls and yellow in walls. I guess all this colors is because exactly the different lighting sources and each light produce a certain cast. (7) on this photoshoot i shoot also furniture with the real wood color . So it was more than important to take the correct color of the wood. If you place more exposure to the wood is becoming more yellow,  less light more dark magenta color.  So in this case i will match the lamp light with the flashes using gels, and taking the correct wb with white card, this will ensure me that i will take the correct color of the furniture? Because in this room the existing light can be tricky to understand with eyes , i mean that what you see there is not the accurate color of the furniture because the existing lamp light it affects to the color of the furniture. (7). What light is considering good light for accurate colors. Lets say flash light is considering accurate? And what about outdoor light coming through window? How close is the outdoor light temperature that is lighting the house from the windows vs the flash light? If the 2 lights are close can you mix them? . (8)  in the showroom there was multiple lamps that  look identical. Lets say that the furniture is located  in the middle of the 2 lamps. Is it possible even if i match the flash using gels the 2 lamps to have some different temperature and this produce strange colors to the scene?  (9 ) what about the floor color that was wood grain with orange and yellow color is the reflection can affect the bed furniture colour? For example a white furniture can take reflections from the wooden color floor. Anyway to eliminate this. Than you in advance for helping me understand the light

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Bob
Bob Senior Member • Posts: 2,425
Use a color reference

Either a custom white balance off a white card or use a "Color Checker" to build a profile of your camera & lighting in Lightroom

https://xritephoto.com/colorchecker-classic

Also, based on the shadows, one light source is not enough in this situation.

skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 5,596
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

Andreascy wrote:

Thank you very much for the answer. You help me so much to improve my knowledge. You are absolutely right about lighting. I couldn't imagine that mixing the light was the problem for this strange color casts in the photos. It took me very long time to improveaimprove thebthe imagesiimages in and Photoshop. The all preperation needs time and patience but its worth a lot. So the important thing i must remember it needed only one light temperature.. So the 50 hz indicate a lamp light pulse?

Actually fluorescent lights with regular magnetic ballasts flicker at twice the power line frequency. So flicker is at 120Hz (for 60Hz power line) and 100Hz (for 50Hz power line). That's because the power line is AC and crosses the zero point twice per cycle. But a photographer told me a long time ago that for best results in fluorescent lights to use a shutter speed of 1/60 second, (I live in the US), to capture both phase reversals of the ac power on the fluorescent bulb. So I remember that, if capturing the best white balance is important.

There are high frequency fluorescent lights that flicker at 20,000 to 60,000 Hz but one does not normally know which type of fluorescent lights are being used so safer to use 1/60 or 1/50 second.

Incandescent lights also flicker but the filaments have thermal inertia so the flicker is less noticeable.

So i will remember if there is a lamp light and i will use this light for matching the flash it has to be 1/50 and less. I have a few questions about this situation. (1) . What will happen if i use my camera in shutter speed more than 1/50 with the existing lamp with or without flash?

The shutter speed is irrelevant for the light from the flash since the flash is so fast.

(2) how i will understand if the specific gel i used is the one that matches with the existing lamp light. I mean i have to view the image in my camera screen and check if there is a noticeable color cast?

https://strobist.blogspot.com/2008/04/lighting-102-61-gelling-for-fluorescent.html

(3) in this scene plain white was the walls and the mattress, is it necessary to use a white card if the is a white on the scene? Like walls and matress?

No. If there is white in the scene just use that as long as you're sure it's really white. If you bring your own white card, you know it's white.

(4). Why not to use grey card, what the difference of white card and grey card for taking the wb correctly in this situation.

I've never used a gray card. I've always just used something white in the scene, or even a sheet of white printer paper.

(5). I have a wb filter that you place it front of the lens and you can take the wb reading. I guess this will work in a different lighting situation, for example outside when i want to shoot a landscape. But in this situation because the light is different front of the lens and different in the beds so for accurate results the reading have to be taken with the light fall to te subject.

Don't know.

(6) On this scene i noticed different colors. Blue on the mattress, magenta- pink in the bed and walls and yellow in walls. I guess all this colors is because exactly the different lighting sources and each light produce a certain cast. (7) on this photoshoot i shoot also furniture with the real wood color . So it was more than important to take the correct color of the wood. If you place more exposure to the wood is becoming more yellow, less light more dark magenta color. So in this case i will match the lamp light with the flashes using gels, and taking the correct wb with white card, this will ensure me that i will take the correct color of the furniture? Because in this room the existing light can be tricky to understand with eyes , i mean that what you see there is not the accurate color of the furniture because the existing lamp light it affects to the color of the furniture. (7). What light is considering good light for accurate colors. Lets say flash light is considering accurate? And what about outdoor light coming through window? How close is the outdoor light temperature that is lighting the house from the windows vs the flash light? If the 2 lights are close can you mix them? .

If you're not using flash, a good way is to use the custom white balance in your camera. Get something white like a white sheet of printer paper, place it in the light that will fall on the subject, set the custom white balance using the white paper, remove the paper and shoot. White balance will be spot on.

(8) in the showroom there was multiple lamps that look identical. Lets say that the furniture is located in the middle of the 2 lamps. Is it possible even if i match the flash using gels the 2 lamps to have some different temperature and this produce strange colors to the scene? (9 ) what about the floor color that was wood grain with orange and yellow color is the reflection can affect the bed furniture colour? For example a white furniture can take reflections from the wooden color floor. Anyway to eliminate this.

This is becoming too complicated. Suggest finding a lighting class in your area.  Also, check out all of the info on the strobist website that I linked to above.

Than you in advance for helping me understand the light

You're welcome.
Sky

Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

skyglider wrote:

Andreascy wrote:

Thank you very much for the answer. You help me so much to improve my knowledge. You are absolutely right about lighting. I couldn't imagine that mixing the light was the problem for this strange color casts in the photos. It took me very long time to improveaimprove thebthe imagesiimages in and Photoshop. The all preperation needs time and patience but its worth a lot. So the important thing i must remember it needed only one light temperature.. So the 50 hz indicate a lamp light pulse?

Actually fluorescent lights with regular magnetic ballasts flicker at twice the power line frequency. So flicker is at 120Hz (for 60Hz power line) and 100Hz (for 50Hz power line). That's because the power line is AC and crosses the zero point twice per cycle. But a photographer told me a long time ago that for best results in fluorescent lights to use a shutter speed of 1/60 second, (I live in the US), to capture both phase reversals of the ac power on the fluorescent bulb. So I remember that, if capturing the best white balance is important.

There are high frequency fluorescent lights that flicker at 20,000 to 60,000 Hz but one does not normally know which type of fluorescent lights are being used so safer to use 1/60 or 1/50 second.

Incandescent lights also flicker but the filaments have thermal inertia so the flicker is less noticeable.

So i will remember if there is a lamp light and i will use this light for matching the flash it has to be 1/50 and less. I have a few questions about this situation. (1) . What will happen if i use my camera in shutter speed more than 1/50 with the existing lamp with or without flash?

The shutter speed is irrelevant for the light from the flash since the flash is so fast.

(2) how i will understand if the specific gel i used is the one that matches with the existing lamp light. I mean i have to view the image in my camera screen and check if there is a noticeable color cast?

https://strobist.blogspot.com/2008/04/lighting-102-61-gelling-for-fluorescent.html

(3) in this scene plain white was the walls and the mattress, is it necessary to use a white card if the is a white on the scene? Like walls and matress?

No. If there is white in the scene just use that as long as you're sure it's really white. If you bring your own white card, you know it's white.

(4). Why not to use grey card, what the difference of white card and grey card for taking the wb correctly in this situation.

I've never used a gray card. I've always just used something white in the scene, or even a sheet of white printer paper.

(5). I have a wb filter that you place it front of the lens and you can take the wb reading. I guess this will work in a different lighting situation, for example outside when i want to shoot a landscape. But in this situation because the light is different front of the lens and different in the beds so for accurate results the reading have to be taken with the light fall to te subject.

Don't know.

(6) On this scene i noticed different colors. Blue on the mattress, magenta- pink in the bed and walls and yellow in walls. I guess all this colors is because exactly the different lighting sources and each light produce a certain cast. (7) on this photoshoot i shoot also furniture with the real wood color . So it was more than important to take the correct color of the wood. If you place more exposure to the wood is becoming more yellow, less light more dark magenta color. So in this case i will match the lamp light with the flashes using gels, and taking the correct wb with white card, this will ensure me that i will take the correct color of the furniture? Because in this room the existing light can be tricky to understand with eyes , i mean that what you see there is not the accurate color of the furniture because the existing lamp light it affects to the color of the furniture. (7). What light is considering good light for accurate colors. Lets say flash light is considering accurate? And what about outdoor light coming through window? How close is the outdoor light temperature that is lighting the house from the windows vs the flash light? If the 2 lights are close can you mix them? .

If you're not using flash, a good way is to use the custom white balance in your camera. Get something white like a white sheet of printer paper, place it in the light that will fall on the subject, set the custom white balance using the white paper, remove the paper and shoot. White balance will be spot on.

(8) in the showroom there was multiple lamps that look identical. Lets say that the furniture is located in the middle of the 2 lamps. Is it possible even if i match the flash using gels the 2 lamps to have some different temperature and this produce strange colors to the scene? (9 ) what about the floor color that was wood grain with orange and yellow color is the reflection can affect the bed furniture colour? For example a white furniture can take reflections from the wooden color floor. Anyway to eliminate this.

This is becoming too complicated. Suggest finding a lighting class in your area. Also, check out all of the info on the strobist website that I linked to above.

Than you in advance for helping me understand the light

You're welcome.
Sky

Thank you very much for you time . your answers help me to improve my knowledge

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Andreascy
OP Andreascy Contributing Member • Posts: 862
Re: Use a color reference

Bob wrote:

Either a custom white balance off a white card or use a "Color Checker" to build a profile of your camera & lighting in Lightroom

https://xritephoto.com/colorchecker-classic

Also, based on the shadows, one light source is not enough in this situation.

Hello. about coloer checker i have one that i bought from chinese seller, its chinese version and its clone of color checker. i tried to use it but i dont know the way. Now it this point i took a photo of color checker, and i paid using the photoshop each color by brush with the values that the color checker is writing. but i stay there , i dont know how to proceed after this)

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Bob
Bob Senior Member • Posts: 2,425
Re: Use a color reference

Andreascy wrote:

Bob wrote:

Either a custom white balance off a white card or use a "Color Checker" to build a profile of your camera & lighting in Lightroom

https://xritephoto.com/colorchecker-classic

Also, based on the shadows, one light source is not enough in this situation.

Hello. about coloer checker i have one that i bought from chinese seller, its chinese version and its clone of color checker. i tried to use it but i dont know the way. Now it this point i took a photo of color checker, and i paid using the photoshop each color by brush with the values that the color checker is writing. but i stay there , i dont know how to proceed after this)

First of all, be careful with imitation products. Very subtle differences, especially in the white balance colors will make a huge difference. And even if the "Cholor" Checker is accurate, it needs to stay that way. Don't know if the fake version uses long-lasting pigments.

That said, you need to download the Color Checker plugin for Lightroom from Xrite. Without that, the color checker won't work. Then you simply take a picture of it, and run the plug-in. Lightroom will create a special profile. Apply that profile to all your shots from the same scene and same lights. Everything will be perfect.

https://blog.xritephoto.com/2009/09/lightroom-plugin-for-colorchecker-passport/#sthash.Hzp6Wr5D.dpbs

Bernie3 Regular Member • Posts: 171
Re: furniture flash photography problem with reflections ? Example with photo.

possible solutions are

control the light
use a camera that has multi auto white balance (expensive to replace camera)
edit in post (example below)

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS50 Pentax KP Pentax smc DA* 300mm F4.0 ED (IF) SDM Pentax smc D-FA 100mm F2.8 Macro WR Pentax smc DA 18-135mm F3.5-5.6ED AL [IF] DC WR +4 more
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