For the weary pro (pocket)

Started 9 months ago | User reviews
OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 2,946
Cost benefit is a real thing

Rambow wrote:

I don`t trust the overly enthusiastic tone of this "review". It`s more of a presentation, really. BUT, i`ve studied the images and can say this:

-The button design and controls appears to be superior to a rx camera.

-The colors are better than sony`s(applicable to any other brand).

-The lens appears to be very sharp.

-It is made in Japan.

The only obvious drawback to this camera as i see it is the price. The official price in my country is more than $1000. What the...? Canon copies a sony rx100 camera and they want for it as much as a rx100 VII goes for? That`s just cheeky.

I had a look on the used market as well and found one locally for around $420. That`s reasonable, actually. However deals like that will be rare simply because canon definitely won`t sell many of these, so there are less cameras ending up on ebay and such.

My personal conclusion- probably a nice camera, as long as the price is right. Coincidently, the same applies for any rx100 camera.

No pocket camera ever is worth $1000, these cameras aren`t even weather/shock resistant.

Honestly, I don't disagree, as the OP of the "review"; if the price is right. Cost benefit should be a large weight. Really the G5X II scratches the itch of a premium, point and shoot, that fits in a pocket, that does everything. I didn't say it was worth it, that's up to the reader.

1" Point and Shoots are a dying breed as they are only incrementally better than a smartphone, any of em, G5X II included. Really it offers incrementally better IQ and more of a traditional point & shoot or even DSLR (if using the pop-up EVF) handling. However photography is as much of an emotional thing as it is a product producer. The G5X II offers a step up both in handling (emotional) and colors (emotional) but also slightly better IQ than smarter-phones, but not a lot on the latter making a $900 proposition illogical for most people reading this "review". Absolutely.

I do stand by my "review" though as the G5X II is arguably the best "all-arounder" however other solutions do certain things better. But if you shoot a little bit of everything, it comes down to is the price acceptable?

As I've told other folks on the forum, it's "the" solution if you want pocket-power. But if budget comes in? IMO, the EOS M platform is the one to beat for bang for buck, but, it won't pocket (in most cases, except, the M100/M200 + EF-M 22mm).

It's hard to beat the most economical APS-C mirrorless solution on the market (M series), after all. It's essentially the new Rebel series, except on steroids (has faster lenses ala EF-M 32mm f/1.4 and 22mm f/2 available) and smaller (mirrorless native).

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Confusedabit Senior Member • Posts: 1,533
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

In a sentence, the best (all-around) pocketable camera on the market for everything except sports where others do better (which I'll cover).

.

The G5X Mark II ticks the important boxes of being powerful and pocketable but is coupled with an EVF and fast versatile lens while also providing an engaging experience with stellar ergonomics, Canon colors, and a touchscreen. You might ask, what's the catch? The catch, the tracking autofocus aka AI-Servo is only available in single-shot mode with all methods, or, single point if doing continuous burst shooting presumably because it's contrast detection, not phase detection.

More likely because Canon seem not to have spent a single cent over the past few years on improving their dot in the middle or everything Contrast Detect focusing rolled out from basic point and shoot to top end kit. It gets faster but that is probably just the faster processors. The lack of Powershot investment in their own areas of expertise not bought in from Sony is very worrying. If Sony have fixed their menu and touch screen woes as the latest high end stuff indicates Canon could have problems.:-(

Said high-speed continuous shooting

 Confusedabit's gear list:Confusedabit's gear list
Canon PowerShot G5 X Canon PowerShot SX620 HS Nikon Coolpix A1000 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-PL8 +6 more
OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 2,946
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Confusedabit wrote:

RLight wrote:

In a sentence, the best (all-around) pocketable camera on the market for everything except sports where others do better (which I'll cover).

.

The G5X Mark II ticks the important boxes of being powerful and pocketable but is coupled with an EVF and fast versatile lens while also providing an engaging experience with stellar ergonomics, Canon colors, and a touchscreen. You might ask, what's the catch? The catch, the tracking autofocus aka AI-Servo is only available in single-shot mode with all methods, or, single point if doing continuous burst shooting presumably because it's contrast detection, not phase detection.

More likely because Canon seem not to have spent a single cent over the past few years on improving their dot in the middle or everything Contrast Detect focusing rolled out from basic point and shoot to top end kit. It gets faster but that is probably just the faster processors. The lack of Powershot investment in their own areas of expertise not bought in from Sony is very worrying. If Sony have fixed their menu and touch screen woes as the latest high end stuff indicates Canon could have problems.:-(

Said high-speed continuous shooting

I've been saying this for years...

Sony's problems are all cosmetic, things like grips, menus, JPEG engine rendering, but a few are more complex like the latter, or CFAs (color filtering arrays) as color science is incredibly delicate and complex.

But yes, most of Sony's problems could be fixed with a firmware update.

Yet, in 2020, they still haven't addressed even just the menus.

Sony's secret to success is their fabs are financed by the mobile phone industry which they can leverage the R&D gleaned from those efforts for their larger sensors. Otherwise, their software engineers (perceivably) are working other projects ala Playstation, and can't be bothered to work a camera system.

To your point, Canon took the easy road here and did yet another Contrast Sensor, however, a better one was available ala Sony RX100 IV sensor, so they'd be foolish not to do at least that so I'm grateful they did.

Do understand Sony's PDAF does not equal Canon's DPAF and Canon would have to write separate AF software to address it, which is quite the investment for no offense, a dying breed (point and shoots). I gather Canon's future on chip AF in a Powershot will be in the form of a G1X III successor, in other words using Canon's own (DPAF) APS-C sensor.

Even though as a tech enthusiast the G5X II is a turnoff with it's CDAF, Canon's done a good job here with implementation. It's fast CDAF; it's being driven by DIGIC8 and the latest AF firmware, and, the Sony RX100 IV sensor has faster readout which helps. It's not DPAF/PDAF, but it's pretty good for what it is.

The G5X II's achilles heal is its sensor: CDAF only and not large enough to make a huge difference vs smartphone equipped with machine learning. It's strength though is it's sensor: allows it to be compact enough to fit in a pocket, do decent 4K, have decent low light performance for a point and shoot.

I'm personally not disappointed with the autofocus of the G5X II, however, I do wish there was an APS-C sensor (90D) with the latest bells and whistles available from Canon ala G1X IV, right now. But, then again, that won't pocket...

There's just not much more that can be done with a 1", even by Sony which is manifest by their latest RX100 VII efforts: more reach, where Smartphones still can't "catch up" with machine learning, yet, but does it at the expense of light gathering to keep the size down. That's the most 1" can do and fit in a pocket.

There isn't much more that can be done here from Canon for the Powershots with a 1" sensor.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
ElusivePhoton
ElusivePhoton New Member • Posts: 11
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

I cannot understand why smartphones are spoken of as credible competitors to top-end point-and-shoots when they lack optical zoom.  Am I one of the few who really cares about optical zoom?  The 70mm-equiv extra lens in the latest smartphones does help a lot, but something like the G5X mkII goes to 120mm, and if Canon and Sony etc. want to keep this category alive they can try to offer longer zoom options.

Separately, am I the only person who thinks an auto-closing lens cover makes point-and-shoots superior for many use cases (like hectic travel moments or other on-the-move, spontanous/serendipitous shooting cases) compared to mirrorless/DSLRs?  I don't even understand how people travel with the latter; are you simply giving up on many shooting opportunities because stopping to remove the lens cover would take too much time --- and cannot be performed if your other hand is carrying something?  I need the flexibility to yank the camera out of my pocket regardless of what my other hand is carrying (and in the middle of stride), take a shot (with zoom if needed) and put it back in my pocket, all within 5 seconds.  I rely on this regularly going through stations and trains in Europe, among other scenarios.  Seems this would be hopeless without an auto-closing lens cover.

Confusedabit Senior Member • Posts: 1,533
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

ElusivePhoton wrote:

I cannot understand why smartphones are spoken of as credible competitors to top-end point-and-shoots when they lack optical zoom. Am I one of the few who really cares about optical zoom? The 70mm-equiv extra lens in the latest smartphones does help a lot, but something like the G5X mkII goes to 120mm, and if Canon and Sony etc. want to keep this category alive they can try to offer longer zoom options.

Separately, am I the only person who thinks an auto-closing lens cover makes point-and-shoots superior for many use cases (like hectic travel moments or other on-the-move, spontanous/serendipitous shooting cases) compared to mirrorless/DSLRs? I don't even understand how people travel with the latter; are you simply giving up on many shooting opportunities because stopping to remove the lens cover would take too much time --- and cannot be performed if your other hand is carrying something? I need the flexibility to yank the camera out of my pocket

Possibly having to straighten out those delicate lens protection blades having argued with something inadvertently left in the pocket and either stuck or scraping across the lens and the pocket lint piling up on the sensor and in the lens over time.

Not everyone has the courage enough to operate like this out of the pocket.

regardless of what my other hand is carrying (and in the middle of stride), take a shot (with zoom if needed) and put it back in my pocket, all within 5 seconds. I rely on this regularly going through stations and trains in Europe, among other scenarios. Seems this would be hopeless without an auto-closing lens cover.

 Confusedabit's gear list:Confusedabit's gear list
Canon PowerShot G5 X Canon PowerShot SX620 HS Nikon Coolpix A1000 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-PL8 +6 more
OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 2,946
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

ElusivePhoton wrote:

I cannot understand why smartphones are spoken of as credible competitors to top-end point-and-shoots when they lack optical zoom. Am I one of the few who really cares about optical zoom? The 70mm-equiv extra lens in the latest smartphones does help a lot, but something like the G5X mkII goes to 120mm, and if Canon and Sony etc. want to keep this category alive they can try to offer longer zoom options.

Separately, am I the only person who thinks an auto-closing lens cover makes point-and-shoots superior for many use cases (like hectic travel moments or other on-the-move, spontanous/serendipitous shooting cases) compared to mirrorless/DSLRs? I don't even understand how people travel with the latter; are you simply giving up on many shooting opportunities because stopping to remove the lens cover would take too much time --- and cannot be performed if your other hand is carrying something? I need the flexibility to yank the camera out of my pocket regardless of what my other hand is carrying (and in the middle of stride), take a shot (with zoom if needed) and put it back in my pocket, all within 5 seconds. I rely on this regularly going through stations and trains in Europe, among other scenarios. Seems this would be hopeless without an auto-closing lens cover.

The G5X Mark II does have an auto-closing lens cover... And it's very useful I might add.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Ed B
Ed B Forum Pro • Posts: 11,155
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

I think everyone who loves photography should own a smaller fixed-lens camera no matter what other types of cameras they might own for more "serious" photography and when I was looking to upgrade my small camera I came very close to buying the Canon.

I've always liked Canon compact cameras but parts of the review for the G5X MKII scared me off and I ended up buying a Sony RX100V instead.

  • JPEG noise reduction at high ISO values lags the competition
  • Low ISO JPEGs can have fine detail smeared due to noise reduction

These are mainly the negatives that chased me away from the Canon.

There are a few things I don't like about the Sony but I have to say, the image quality is excellent for a small camera.

Ed B
Ed B Forum Pro • Posts: 11,155
One moe thing.

Ed B wrote:

I think everyone who loves photography should own a smaller fixed-lens camera no matter what other types of cameras they might own for more "serious" photography and when I was looking to upgrade my small camera I came very close to buying the Canon.

I've always liked Canon compact cameras but parts of the review for the G5X MKII scared me off and I ended up buying a Sony RX100V instead.

  • JPEG noise reduction at high ISO values lags the competition
  • Low ISO JPEGs can have fine detail smeared due to noise reduction

These are mainly the negatives that chased me away from the Canon.

There are a few things I don't like about the Sony but I have to say, the image quality is excellent for a small camera.

By the way, one of the things I have against the little Sony is that after I bought it several people have told me it's not really a pocket camera because of the fragile lens covering.

Seems the same as the Canon

Personally, I think buying a camera that's almost too small (Sony RX100V) makes little sense if it can't be carried in a pocket.

OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 2,946
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Ed B wrote:

I think everyone who loves photography should own a smaller fixed-lens camera no matter what other types of cameras they might own for more "serious" photography and when I was looking to upgrade my small camera I came very close to buying the Canon.

I've always liked Canon compact cameras but parts of the review for the G5X MKII scared me off and I ended up buying a Sony RX100V instead.

  • JPEG noise reduction at high ISO values lags the competition
  • Low ISO JPEGs can have fine detail smeared due to noise reduction

These are mainly the negatives that chased me away from the Canon.

There are a few things I don't like about the Sony but I have to say, the image quality is excellent for a small camera.

Those are legitimate grievances btw; I've been noting them myself lately.

However comma, Sony's lack of effective touchscreen and lesser all-around lens (either too slow on the RX100VI+ or not nearly as long of reach on the RX100V-), SOOC colors, are huge downfalls by comparison. The poor noise reduction is a nit pick on needs improvement. The others are a big, big deal.

I keep saying it, but eventually Sony will get it right. But eventually still hasn't happened, which is a small wonder (of the universe).

On the plus side, on the new A7S III Sony has done new menus and a full touchscreen, it just hasn't made it to any other products yet.

Canon on the other hand, has improved their noise reduction on all the new EOS R's, but, the new M50 Mark II didn't get it.

So both are poised to fix their problems, but haven't. Hmph.

As it stands, in my book, the G5X II handily bests the Sony RX100s, for all but sports use.

The real question; will either Canon or Sony do more premium point and shoots, given COVID and increasing market pressure? I honestly don't know. Point and shoots are a dying breed due to smartphone attrition.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Rohith Thumati Contributing Member • Posts: 687
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

The real question; will either Canon or Sony do more premium point and shoots, given COVID and increasing market pressure? I honestly don't know. Point and shoots are a dying breed due to smartphone attrition.

I really hope they do. Even though I take a ton of photos with my iPhone and I have a Z6, my LX100 II is my go-to for a lot of situations. The combination of size/weight/discretion, image quality, and ability to use one-handed (when you have little kids, having both hands free is a luxury! ๐Ÿ˜„) make high end compacts great travel/everyday cameras. I don’t find one handed use to be that easy with a phone or an ILC (especially if you want to zoom in/out the lens) One handed use really isn’t that easy with a phone something that’s harder to do with a phone, and really hard with an ILC. The high end point-and-shoot are my favorite kind of travel cameras (when travel is a thing again)

Going to the beach, park, or hike with the kids? LX100 II. School/daycare event? LX100 II. Amusement park or museum? LX100 II. Travel where photography isn’t the priority? LX100 II.

A couple recent examples where I was happy to have my LX100 II instead of another camera:

  • We went to the beach on a trip to SoCal a few months ago. I wanted to get some photos of the waves coming in while being knee deep in the surf. I needed one hand free in case I lost my balance, so the Z6 wouldn’t have been a good idea, and there’s no way I’m taking my phone anywhere near the surf, since if that got water logged, I’d be SOL. The LX100 II was the best choice.
  • My daughter’s day care had a little socially-distanced trick or treat event yesterday, and the images I was able to get with my LX100 II were miles better than what other parents were able to capture with their phones - especially since the little fill flash combined with fast shutter speeds allowed for photos that otherwise weren’t capturable.

None of the current crop are perfect, but hopefully Sony, Canon, or someone else decide to put it it all together and make that ultimate travel compact camera that’s still relevant despite the ever increasing quality of cell phones.

Confusedabit Senior Member • Posts: 1,533
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

Ed B wrote:

I think everyone who loves photography should own a smaller fixed-lens camera no matter what other types of cameras they might own for more "serious" photography and when I was looking to upgrade my small camera I came very close to buying the Canon.

I've always liked Canon compact cameras but parts of the review for the G5X MKII scared me off and I ended up buying a Sony RX100V instead.

  • JPEG noise reduction at high ISO values lags the competition
  • Low ISO JPEGs can have fine detail smeared due to noise reduction

These are mainly the negatives that chased me away from the Canon.

There are a few things I don't like about the Sony but I have to say, the image quality is excellent for a small camera.

Those are legitimate grievances btw; I've been noting them myself lately.

However comma, Sony's lack of effective touchscreen and lesser all-around lens (either too slow on the RX100VI+ or not nearly as long of reach on the RX100V-), SOOC colors, are huge downfalls by comparison. The poor noise reduction is a nit pick on needs improvement. The others are a big, big deal.

I keep saying it, but eventually Sony will get it right. But eventually still hasn't happened, which is a small wonder (of the universe).

On the plus side, on the new A7S III Sony has done new menus and a full touchscreen, it just hasn't made it to any other products yet.

Sony seem to have a real price problem and you wonder if the funds are there in imaging to really keep up this frenetic development. They are focusing on the electronics and have the sensors on hand but there is a lot of paring on the other bits of the camera.

It is interesting how Panasonic have output a raft of different touch screen cameras with 1" yet Sony really just churn out much of the same with just a faster focus and the latest sensor.

Canon on the other hand, has improved their noise reduction on all the new EOS R's, but, the new M50 Mark II didn't get it.

So both are poised to fix their problems, but haven't. Hmph.

As it stands, in my book, the G5X II handily bests the Sony RX100s, for all but sports use.

The real question; will either Canon or Sony do more premium point and shoots, given COVID and increasing market pressure? I honestly don't know. Point and shoots are a dying breed due to smartphone attrition.

 Confusedabit's gear list:Confusedabit's gear list
Canon PowerShot G5 X Canon PowerShot SX620 HS Nikon Coolpix A1000 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-PL8 +6 more
Rohith Thumati Contributing Member • Posts: 687
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Confusedabit wrote:

It is interesting how Panasonic have output a raft of different touch screen cameras with 1" yet Sony really just churn out much of the same with just a faster focus and the latest sensor.

Touchscreen criticism aside, I’m not sure that’s quite fair to Sony. They’ve had 3 completely different lenses across the 9 different RX100/ZV-1 models (I may be missing a variation in there; their naming conventions are terrible). They’ve also had 2 different lenses for the RX10 line, and the RX0 action camera line. Maybe I’m missing something, but I don’t see Panasonic doing all that much better:

DPReview List of Panasonic Compact Cameras

DPReview List of Sony Compact Cameras

Confusedabit Senior Member • Posts: 1,533
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Rohith Thumati wrote:

Confusedabit wrote:

It is interesting how Panasonic have output a raft of different touch screen cameras with 1" yet Sony really just churn out much of the same with just a faster focus and the latest sensor.

Touchscreen criticism aside, I’m not sure that’s quite fair to Sony. They’ve had 3 completely different lenses across the 9 different RX100/ZV-1 models (I may be missing a variation in there; their naming conventions are terrible). They’ve also had 2 different lenses for the RX10 line, and the RX0 action camera line. Maybe I’m missing something, but I don’t see Panasonic doing all that much better:

DPReview List of Panasonic Compact Cameras

DPReview List of Sony Compact Cameras

It took them a heap of time in the RX100 to break out of the 70mm barrier and Panasonic were well ahead of them there. The release prices also are pretty mind boggling also and the persistence of old models just makes assessing what does what a constant nightmare. I wish they would trim down the range but they are struggling with costs obviously and running old lines keeps the low end going.

The average CIPA embarkation fixed camera cost was $264 in Jun but $208 in August from my calculations. Are Sony or any of them really shifting much of this exotic stuff? It does not make any sense looking at these numbers. The HX400V surprisingly holds up well with the current SX70 in comparator images and they probably just sell a load of these more than anything else though anyone wanting to post an image will see they will just get a lecture on the wonders of the 1" sensor and not bother.

I am intrigued to see the different in value of kit talked about on these forums and that out there with silent users looking at what they are paying. Even with dealers markup it is difficult to see much current Sony or any other makers top end kit out there. 1" generates a lot of talk but how much money it makes is as always a mystery in the secretive camera industry.

I would be interested in your views on this.

 Confusedabit's gear list:Confusedabit's gear list
Canon PowerShot G5 X Canon PowerShot SX620 HS Nikon Coolpix A1000 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-PL8 +6 more
prisms Regular Member • Posts: 176
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)
1

ElusivePhoton wrote:

I cannot understand why smartphones are spoken of as credible competitors to top-end point-and-shoots when they lack optical zoom. Am I one of the few who really cares about optical zoom? The 70mm-equiv extra lens in the latest smartphones does help a lot, but something like the G5X mkII goes to 120mm, and if Canon and Sony etc. want to keep this category alive they can try to offer longer zoom options.

I also donโ€™t understand how the iq of this amazing p&s (I bought it a week ago for $600) is only marginally better than what you get from a premium smartphone!

Isnโ€™t a 1โ€ sensor significantly larger than what they put in smartphones? Also the optics on the G5m2 are clearly far superior than anything on a smartphone. And then there are the control buttons which provides for a far more satisfactory shooting experience. Only the smartphone generation would not understand this.

 prisms's gear list:prisms's gear list
Canon G5 X II
Rohith Thumati Contributing Member • Posts: 687
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Confusedabit wrote:

It took them a heap of time in the RX100 to break out of the 70mm barrier and Panasonic were well ahead of them there. The release prices also are pretty mind boggling also and the persistence of old models just makes assessing what does what a constant nightmare. I wish they would trim down the range but they are struggling with costs obviously and running old lines keeps the low end going.

Sort of - the first two RX100’s had a dimmer 28-100 lens; they didn’t go to the 24-70 until the 3rd iteration. So, between the three different lenses on the RX100/ZV-1, the two different on the RX10, the RX0, and the oddball QX100, I think Sony has done as good of a job as anyone as trying different things with their 1” sensor platform.

Agree on the other points!

The average CIPA embarkation fixed camera cost was $264 in Jun but $208 in August from my calculations. Are Sony or any of them really shifting much of this exotic stuff? It does not make any sense looking at these numbers. The HX400V surprisingly holds up well with the current SX70 in comparator images and they probably just sell a load of these more than anything else though anyone wanting to post an image will see they will just get a lecture on the wonders of the 1" sensor and not bother.

I am intrigued to see the different in value of kit talked about on these forums and that out there with silent users looking at what they are paying. Even with dealers markup it is difficult to see much current Sony or any other makers top end kit out there. 1" generates a lot of talk but how much money it makes is as always a mystery in the secretive camera industry.

I would be interested in your views on this.

The high end cameras are probably only a couple percentage points of unit volume, but they’re certainly the bulk of profit, making them worthwhile. Premium, higher priced products almost always have significantly higher profit margin than lower end goods.

Here’s a thought exercise. Hypothetical Camera Co. sells two cameras, the Cheapo-1 for $150 at wholesale, and the Xpensive-10 for $800 at wholesale. HCC sells 10,000 units of the Cheapo-1 and 980 units of the Xpensive-10, which gives HCC an average revenue per unit of $208.

The profit margin on the Cheapo-1 is 10%, so HCC gets $15/unit in net profit, while the profit margin on the Xpensive-10 is 20%, giving HCC a net profit of $160/unit. So even though the Xpensive-10 is a bit less than 1% of the volume of the Cheapo-1, it generates ~51% of HCC’s total profit.

While obviously not real (if anything, I’m probably underestimating the difference in profit margin between the expensive and cheap product), I think it’s a good illustration of why the higher end kit exists. It won’t sell in high volumes, sure, but it doesn’t need to either to be worthwhile.

It doesn’t surprise me that unit value went down this summer, either - given the shaky global economy over the summer, high unemployment, and lack of travel and other photographic opportunities during the pandemic, that should be expected,

IWBF
IWBF Regular Member • Posts: 228
Naming 101

It's Cheapo-10 and Xpensive-1 not Cheapo-1 and Xpensive-10.

๐Ÿค“

ElusivePhoton
ElusivePhoton New Member • Posts: 11
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Confusedabit wrote:

Possibly having to straighten out those delicate lens protection blades having argued with something inadvertently left in the pocket and either stuck or scraping across the lens and the pocket lint piling up on the sensor and in the lens over time.

Not everyone has the courage enough to operate like this out of the pocket.

Perhaps some do have issues like that, but I always have a dedicated pocket for my G series P&S, which also is something that's easier half the year when wearing a jacket.  As for lint, many jackets use materials that don't generate lint, and in any event it sounds like something that might take years to become an issue.

ElusivePhoton
ElusivePhoton New Member • Posts: 11
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

The G5X Mark II does have an auto-closing lens cover... And it's very useful I might add.

Yes - that's why I'm so keen on that camera!

Perhaps you can help assuage a concern I have -- I am checking out a G7X mk III currently and there is a surprising and annoying lag of a half-second between pressing the shutter and the image being displayed on the LCD for review.  (The screen continues to act like a viewfinder during this interval; if it briefly went black or something that at least might be a little less annoying.)  This is not affected by image resolution or JPG versus RAW usage, etc.; I am not aware of any setting that can eliminate this.  Never have I ever seen any camera behave like this.  I also discovered the SX740 seems to behave similarly.  I'm trying to figure out if this is a result of Canon firmware circa 2019, and whether they might fix it in the future, or whether this might be regarded as desirable behavior for whatever reason.

Does the G5X mk II have this lag?  Are you using Firmware 1.1 or an earlier version?

Rohith Thumati Contributing Member • Posts: 687
Re: Naming 101

Hypothetical Camera Co aims to disrupt the camera market with an innovative naming scheme ๐Ÿ˜

IWBF
IWBF Regular Member • Posts: 228
Re: Naming 101

Aha, I see ๐Ÿคฃ

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads