For the weary pro (pocket)

Started 11 months ago | User reviews
RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
For the weary pro (pocket)
9

In a sentence, the best (all-around) pocketable camera on the market for everything except sports where others do better (which I'll cover).

.

The G5X Mark II ticks the important boxes of being powerful and pocketable but is coupled with an EVF and fast versatile lens while also providing an engaging experience with stellar ergonomics, Canon colors, and a touchscreen. You might ask, what's the catch? The catch, the tracking autofocus aka AI-Servo is only available in single-shot mode with all methods, or, single point if doing continuous burst shooting presumably because it's contrast detection, not phase detection. Said high-speed continuous shooting that you might use in sports-scenarios, is where you'd also want more than 120mm reach anyways, are the catches. Otherwise, I've found it tracks faces well, can hit my kids on the swing (when using single shot AI-servo, with decent but not perfect results, which is a hard thing to do), can shoot my cat in the dark (without a flash), is reasonably sharp, and has a decent macro mode. It should be noted this chomps batteries and has a plastic build which cuts down on bulk but I wouldn't push it in sandstorms or rain like I would on a G1X Mark III and you should buy a second battery.

.

For pro's, the list for powerful pocket cameras is short: Canon Powershot G5X Mark II, and the Sony RX100 series. Regarding the RX100 I-VA, I recommend the G5X Mark II over it due to the more versatile lens, full-functional touchscreen and better ergonomics with excellent SOOC colors. But, where I'd say to consider the Sony RX100 is for the VI or VII and you want a pocket sports shooter. 200mm, even though slower in aperture, plus the phase detect Sony AF is where that makes sense. But for anything else / you plan on shooting sports less than other things? You guessed it, G5X Mark II is the smarter choice.

.

I do recommend you read my former G1X Mark III review for comparisons of point and shoots and more about Canon's other alternative, the G1X Mark III as this commonly will pop up on people's radar that are interested in the G5X Mark II.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/62431147

.

Regarding against the G1X Mark III itself I'll say it's a quality vs quantity fight. The G1X Mark III gives you only 24-72mm, but, has higher quality images that come out of it, is weather sealed, has a DSLR form factor and a swivel screen (quality-things). But, the G5X Mark II does 4K, does 24-120mm, and can pocket (quantity-things).

.

Regarding image quality: I'd rank this right smack between a G5X (Mark I) / G7X Mark II and the G1X Mark III. Against Sony? Sony may be a bit sharper, but, the G5X Mark II has more reach and better colors making for more interesting images leveling that playing field and arguably dominates it being married with Sony's own RX100 IV sensor, which tops DXO's charts for a 1" sensor. I've found SOOC color to be Canon-like, however, having said Sony sensor may have something to do with the large latitude the RAW files give (you should shoot RAW on this camera to get the most from it in my book) which really can sing if you're into post-processing. Here's a link to my Flickr album dedicated to the G5X Mark II, which I have shoot RAW on most of them and post-processed with a Canon DPP4 and Lightroom combo to preserve Canon colors, but, give more control over mid-tones...

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmMJVSmk

.

Regarding Autofocus, likewise, see the Flickr Album above as to what it can accomplish, it's no slouch despite being limited to contrast detection. In general shooting it's more than adequate. AI-servo is suprisingly very responsive but has the caveats of either single shot which can grab a candid, but not appropriate for high speed action, or, single point for said action, but keeping the focus point over the subject is a challenge making it less suitable for that sort of thing, but I've gotten impressive results tracking my kids on bikes, scooters and the like with it. I simply don't have the problems others have reported with autofocus. I do recommend setting up C mode against Program, with AI-Servo and Single shot (not continuous) so you can get candids easily with back button focus and then switch over to another mode, even Auto, for continuous shooting needs.

.

Regarding video: You can also likewise slide over to video mode for 4k (right next to the C mode), the only way you can use 4k as simply pressing the record button does 1080P in all modes except video mode itself, you must slide over to video mode for 4K. The video autofocus update Canon came out with clearly must've improved the dismal former reviews of the product as I've found the autofocus in video completely acceptable, even though it's only contrast detect, it's very responsive post-update. Sure, a G1X Mark III can do better, but, then again it can't do 4K. It really is that simple in my viewing of the material that's come out of both on my big screen TV. I'll outright say it, the 4K of the G5X Mark II outweighs the DPAF of the G1X Mark III.

.

Build:

I've owned the G1X Mark III in the past and can say this is a step down. Plastic controls, plastic EVF. But, the grip is nice, the control dial is well placed and responsive. My copy of the camera, you do have to slap down the EVF a bit harder then I'd think to stow it, but have had no reliability issues. I've had no issues running with it, it's taken some knocks in the pocket and has suffered no ill. It's about the size of a wallet, but, likewise, it's about the size of a wallet, so it may pocket better in front pockets, or cargo pockets but sometimes is a bit bulky for back pockets.

.

Suggested use:

The G5X Mark II is the sort of camera you keep on you to catch the unexpected. It's a good all-arounder as I mentioned earlier. Portraits, landscapes, night shots, candids, even sports / action. Video is good, has digital zoom, which is really useful. Whether you want something to do a bit of everything and fit in a pocket but have more power, or leave the bag and lenses at home, this is a nice break when you get tired of that larger rig you shoot for profession but want quality results. The RAW burst and Panorama modes deserve a shout out as they're good for catching things that blow up (gender reveals anyone?) or things that require a larger field of view (landscapes, interiors).

.

Closing thoughts:

I had reservations buying this due to poor reviews of autofocus, but have not had any problems, in fact I'm quite impressed for what it is especially when you either use "Auto" mode which is quite intelligent, or, C mode programmed against P with Back Button Focus, single shot, and AI-Servo. Its image quality has been what other reviewers have been able to produce, which is to say impressive when "only" straight out of camera, but, is very impressive if you shoot RAW and post process to taste (I did the latter).

The preface I originally gave about sports, is where I'm going to interrupt my outright recommendation for most folks considering this camera... If, you are a (heavy) sports shooter, consider the RX100 VI or VII. 200mm and Sony AF is tough to beat for that. Likewise, if you're a (heavy) landscape shooter, you should consider the G1X Mark III, hard to beat 24MP, APS-C and a high quality 15mm capable lens. Portrait-heavy? Have a hard look at the LX100 II with it's unbeatable equivalence. Vlogging? G7X Mark III does straight to Youtube uploads and has the coveted microphone socket which is conspicuously missing from the G5X Mark II (considering how similar the two are).

But, each of these options fails in some other way... The RX100's fail in usability, straight out of camera color, and lens "speed" when comparing the VI and VIIs against the G5X Mark II. The G1X Mark III? It can't pocket, isn't as fast with autofocus and doesn't have the same reach. LX100 II? Image quality can be somewhat of an issue in low light from the samples I've seen for whatever reason even though it has a larger format sensor to 1" and a faster lens and obviously is as pocketable as the G1X Mark III, which is to say not really. G7X III? Less lens reach, average internet benchmark sharpness scores falls short of the G5X Mark II on top of its lacks of EVF.

All to say, the G5X Mark II does everything well, but isn't an expert in a particular category, but, does this in a pocket, does this at sub-$1000, and does this with Canon's ease of use and colors. Highly recommended.

Candids (autofocus and bokeh)

Textures and patterns (sharpness)

Unexpected travels (lightweight and pocketable)

Unexpected colors (RAW processing latitude)

Flowers (macro work)

Landscapes (wide focal and sharpness, color, RAW latitude)

Animals (zoom reach)

Cat (low-light)

Swings (Autofocus)

Which road will you take?

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II
20 megapixels • 3 screen • 24 – 120 mm (5×)
Announced: Jul 9, 2019
RLight's score
5.0
Average community score
4.6
bad for good for
Kids / pets
great
Action / sports
good
Landscapes / scenery
great
Portraits
great
Low light (without flash)
excellent
Flash photography (social)
great
Studio / still life
excellent
= community average
Canon G5 X II Canon PowerShot G5 X Canon PowerShot G7 X Panasonic LX100 Sony RX100 Sony RX100 IV Sony RX100 VI
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Rohith Thumati Contributing Member • Posts: 690
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Great review, and excellent pictures (and illustrations of the capabilities and limitations of the G5 X II). I’ve appreciated the regular updates on your experience with it as well.

One aspect I haven’t seen covered (if I’ve missed it, sorry) - how effective do you find the image stabilization?

Sue Anne Rush
Sue Anne Rush Senior Member • Posts: 1,716
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Excellent .... thank you for sharing :))

RLight wrote:

In a sentence, the best (all-around) pocketable camera on the market for everything except sports where others do better (which I'll cover).

.

The G5X Mark II ticks the important boxes of being powerful and pocketable but is coupled with an EVF and fast versatile lens while also providing an engaging experience with stellar ergonomics, Canon colors, and a touchscreen. You might ask, what's the catch? The catch, the tracking autofocus aka AI-Servo is only available in single-shot mode with all methods, or, single point if doing continuous burst shooting presumably because it's contrast detection, not phase detection. Said high-speed continuous shooting that you might use in sports-scenarios, is where you'd also want more than 120mm reach anyways, are the catches. Otherwise, I've found it tracks faces well, can hit my kids on the swing (when using single shot AI-servo, with decent but not perfect results, which is a hard thing to do), can shoot my cat in the dark (without a flash), is reasonably sharp, and has a decent macro mode. It should be noted this chomps batteries and has a plastic build which cuts down on bulk but I wouldn't push it in sandstorms or rain like I would on a G1X Mark III and you should buy a second battery.

.

For pro's, the list for powerful pocket cameras is short: Canon Powershot G5X Mark II, and the Sony RX100 series. Regarding the RX100 I-VA, I recommend the G5X Mark II over it due to the more versatile lens, full-functional touchscreen and better ergonomics with excellent SOOC colors. But, where I'd say to consider the Sony RX100 is for the VI or VII and you want a pocket sports shooter. 200mm, even though slower in aperture, plus the phase detect Sony AF is where that makes sense. But for anything else / you plan on shooting sports less than other things? You guessed it, G5X Mark II is the smarter choice.

.

I do recommend you read my former G1X Mark III review for comparisons of point and shoots and more about Canon's other alternative, the G1X Mark III as this commonly will pop up on people's radar that are interested in the G5X Mark II.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/62431147

.

Regarding against the G1X Mark III itself I'll say it's a quality vs quantity fight. The G1X Mark III gives you only 24-72mm, but, has higher quality images that come out of it, is weather sealed, has a DSLR form factor and a swivel screen (quality-things). But, the G5X Mark II does 4K, does 24-120mm, and can pocket (quantity-things).

.

Regarding image quality: I'd rank this right smack between a G5X (Mark I) / G7X Mark II and the G1X Mark III. Against Sony? Sony may be a bit sharper, but, the G5X Mark II has more reach and better colors making for more interesting images leveling that playing field and arguably dominates it being married with Sony's own RX100 IV sensor, which tops DXO's charts for a 1" sensor. I've found SOOC color to be Canon-like, however, having said Sony sensor may have something to do with the large latitude the RAW files give (you should shoot RAW on this camera to get the most from it in my book) which really can sing if you're into post-processing. Here's a link to my Flickr album dedicated to the G5X Mark II, which I have shoot RAW on most of them and post-processed with a Canon DPP4 and Lightroom combo to preserve Canon colors, but, give more control over mid-tones...

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmMJVSmk

.

Regarding Autofocus, likewise, see the Flickr Album above as to what it can accomplish, it's no slouch despite being limited to contrast detection. In general shooting it's more than adequate. AI-servo is suprisingly very responsive but has the caveats of either single shot which can grab a candid, but not appropriate for high speed action, or, single point for said action, but keeping the focus point over the subject is a challenge making it less suitable for that sort of thing, but I've gotten impressive results tracking my kids on bikes, scooters and the like with it. I simply don't have the problems others have reported with autofocus. I do recommend setting up C mode against Program, with AI-Servo and Single shot (not continuous) so you can get candids easily with back button focus and then switch over to another mode, even Auto, for continuous shooting needs.

.

Regarding video: You can also likewise slide over to video mode for 4k (right next to the C mode), the only way you can use 4k as simply pressing the record button does 1080P in all modes except video mode itself, you must slide over to video mode for 4K. The video autofocus update Canon came out with clearly must've improved the dismal former reviews of the product as I've found the autofocus in video completely acceptable, even though it's only contrast detect, it's very responsive post-update. Sure, a G1X Mark III can do better, but, then again it can't do 4K. It really is that simple in my viewing of the material that's come out of both on my big screen TV. I'll outright say it, the 4K of the G5X Mark II outweighs the DPAF of the G1X Mark III.

.

Build:

I've owned the G1X Mark III in the past and can say this is a step down. Plastic controls, plastic EVF. But, the grip is nice, the control dial is well placed and responsive. My copy of the camera, you do have to slap down the EVF a bit harder then I'd think to stow it, but have had no reliability issues. I've had no issues running with it, it's taken some knocks in the pocket and has suffered no ill. It's about the size of a wallet, but, likewise, it's about the size of a wallet, so it may pocket better in front pockets, or cargo pockets but sometimes is a bit bulky for back pockets.

.

Suggested use:

The G5X Mark II is the sort of camera you keep on you to catch the unexpected. It's a good all-arounder as I mentioned earlier. Portraits, landscapes, night shots, candids, even sports / action. Video is good, has digital zoom, which is really useful. Whether you want something to do a bit of everything and fit in a pocket but have more power, or leave the bag and lenses at home, this is a nice break when you get tired of that larger rig you shoot for profession but want quality results. The RAW burst and Panorama modes deserve a shout out as they're good for catching things that blow up (gender reveals anyone?) or things that require a larger field of view (landscapes, interiors).

.

Closing thoughts:

I had reservations buying this due to poor reviews of autofocus, but have not had any problems, in fact I'm quite impressed for what it is especially when you either use "Auto" mode which is quite intelligent, or, C mode programmed against P with Back Button Focus, single shot, and AI-Servo. Its image quality has been what other reviewers have been able to produce, which is to say impressive when "only" straight out of camera, but, is very impressive if you shoot RAW and post process to taste (I did the latter).

The preface I originally gave about sports, is where I'm going to interrupt my outright recommendation for most folks considering this camera... If, you are a (heavy) sports shooter, consider the RX100 VI or VII. 200mm and Sony AF is tough to beat for that. Likewise, if you're a (heavy) landscape shooter, you should consider the G1X Mark III, hard to beat 24MP, APS-C and a high quality 15mm capable lens. Portrait-heavy? Have a hard look at the LX100 II with it's unbeatable equivalence. Vlogging? G7X Mark III does straight to Youtube uploads and has the coveted microphone socket which is conspicuously missing from the G5X Mark II (considering how similar the two are).

But, each of these options fails in some other way... The RX100's fail in usability, straight out of camera color, and lens "speed" when comparing the VI and VIIs against the G5X Mark II. The G1X Mark III? It can't pocket, isn't as fast with autofocus and doesn't have the same reach. LX100 II? Image quality can be somewhat of an issue in low light from the samples I've seen for whatever reason even though it has a larger format sensor to 1" and a faster lens and obviously is as pocketable as the G1X Mark III, which is to say not really. G7X III? Less lens reach, average internet benchmark sharpness scores falls short of the G5X Mark II on top of its lacks of EVF.

All to say, the G5X Mark II does everything well, but isn't an expert in a particular category, but, does this in a pocket, does this at sub-$1000, and does this with Canon's ease of use and colors. Highly recommended.

Candids (autofocus and bokeh)

Textures and patterns (sharpness)

Unexpected travels (lightweight and pocketable)

Unexpected colors (RAW processing latitude)

Flowers (macro work)

Landscapes (wide focal and sharpness, color, RAW latitude)

Animals (zoom reach)

Cat (low-light)

Swings (Autofocus)

Which road will you take?

 Sue Anne Rush's gear list:Sue Anne Rush's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ1000 II Canon EOS 7D
(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 1,455
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)
1

You have to like corner EVFs which I do not like myself especially being left eye dominant in addition to the nuisance of having to deploy and them pull them back. The original G5X Mk is an extremely comfortable camera to use and having had a Sony HX90 I would not want one of these pop up EVFs myself again as a lot of time was wasted on occasions needing an extra pull to engage it back properly but the Canon may be OK in this respect and larger.

Something worth mentioning but it depends on people's preferences. I suppose Canon may get the auto deploy one in the next iteration if ever. I will wait for that.

OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

AllFlawed wrote:

You have to like corner EVFs which I do not like myself especially being left eye dominant in addition to the nuisance of having to deploy and them pull them back. The original G5X Mk is an extremely comfortable camera to use and having had a Sony HX90 I would not want one of these pop up EVFs myself again as a lot of time was wasted on occasions needing an extra pull to engage it back properly but the Canon may be OK in this respect and larger.

Something worth mentioning but it depends on people's preferences. I suppose Canon may get the auto deploy one in the next iteration if ever. I will wait for that.

Too funny. I'm a left-eye dominant glasses wearing shooter

I do love EVFs... Or OVFs, either will do but I prefer EVFs for their advantages (exposure simulation). I'm an old school DSLR-shooter so I'm hooked on some form of traditional framing even though I've relaxed a bit and use the touchscreen more frequently these days, old habit die hard (framing in an EVF/OVF).

My bigger compliant is I occasionally accidentally tap the touchscreen while EVF is engaged and have to cancel. You get used to it. Happens on my larger cameras (EOS R) too, but more frequently on the G5X Mark II if that's what you're asking.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Rohith Thumati wrote:

Great review, and excellent pictures (and illustrations of the capabilities and limitations of the G5 X II). I’ve appreciated the regular updates on your experience with it as well.

One aspect I haven’t seen covered (if I’ve missed it, sorry) - how effective do you find the image stabilization?

Quite effective. I haven't mentioned it because it's an assumption (that is works and is commensurate with other cameras/systems - it is btw).

I haven't tested how far it goes down to, I can if you're curious... I have very shaky hands so IS or a faster shutter is in fact required for caffeine guzzlers like myself

IS is just making sure my shots come out crispy (for me) or making sure I don't blow my ISO out of the water at times when I want to maintain a longer focal but dial down the shutter to something more reasonable. Other folks like to use it as a quasi tripod, I don't. I've found point and shoots IS systems aren't good enough for that sort of thing, but I can try. I'm not the best candidate to test that though due to my coffee habit truth told if that's what you're after but can report back with best shutter that's in focus.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Yannis1976
Yannis1976 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,560
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Thank you!

I have bought one used from eBay and waiting for it to test it against my X100F. Of course I am not expecting better IQ from the G5X but what I am looking for is more convenience with relatively adequate/good IQ.

The X100F is great as a camera with very good IQ but has some limitations that I cant seem to overcome (fixed lens, not pocketable, lack of tilt screen for waist shooting). The G5X II has all these covered so it will be mainly IQ and user experience that I will be checking. Lets see, it will be one of the two...

 Yannis1976's gear list:Yannis1976's gear list
Olympus TG-5 Canon G5 X II Fujifilm XF 35mm F2 R WR Fujifilm 50mm F2 R WR Fujifilm XF 16-80mm F4
(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 1,455
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

AllFlawed wrote:

You have to like corner EVFs which I do not like myself especially being left eye dominant in addition to the nuisance of having to deploy and them pull them back. The original G5X Mk is an extremely comfortable camera to use and having had a Sony HX90 I would not want one of these pop up EVFs myself again as a lot of time was wasted on occasions needing an extra pull to engage it back properly but the Canon may be OK in this respect and larger.

Something worth mentioning but it depends on people's preferences. I suppose Canon may get the auto deploy one in the next iteration if ever. I will wait for that.

Too funny. I'm a left-eye dominant glasses wearing shooter

I do love EVFs... Or OVFs, either will do but I prefer EVFs for their advantages (exposure simulation). I'm an old school DSLR-shooter so I'm hooked on some form of traditional framing even though I've relaxed a bit and use the touchscreen more frequently these days, old habit die hard (framing in an EVF/OVF).

My bigger compliant is I occasionally accidentally tap the touchscreen while EVF is engaged and have to cancel. You get used to it. Happens on my larger cameras (EOS R) too, but more frequently on the G5X Mark II if that's what you're asking.

I do wonder sometimes if I should have got the Mk II for the lens but the G5x does and it has the extra AF Frame selector button which is useful and the front dial. I do not think the hump and the look of it as regards portability made it much of a seller and not for the RAW user wanting speed. The Mk I always looks bigger in photos than it actually is.

OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Yannis1976 wrote:

Thank you!

I have bought one used from eBay and waiting for it to test it against my X100F. Of course I am not expecting better IQ from the G5X but what I am looking for is more convenience with relatively adequate/good IQ.

The X100F is great as a camera with very good IQ but has some limitations that I cant seem to overcome (fixed lens, not pocketable, lack of tilt screen for waist shooting). The G5X II has all these covered so it will be mainly IQ and user experience that I will be checking. Lets see, it will be one of the two...

The X100F, is APS-C, it's in another IQ tier entirely, especially with a prime!

But to your point (and mine about tradeoffs), you loose quite a bit (fixed focal and not pocketable). The G5X II scratches the itches of convenience but does it with reasonable tradeoffs (not top notch build, not the sharpest lens but not dull, 1" sensor)

It's a juggling game. I suspect if you want something you can pocket, the G5X II will be a go-to for many for some time to come. The reality is, to get pocket-able, you gotta go 1", but then you have to deal with the limitations of 1" (less image quality than a larger sensor).

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

AllFlawed wrote:

RLight wrote:

AllFlawed wrote:

You have to like corner EVFs which I do not like myself especially being left eye dominant in addition to the nuisance of having to deploy and them pull them back. The original G5X Mk is an extremely comfortable camera to use and having had a Sony HX90 I would not want one of these pop up EVFs myself again as a lot of time was wasted on occasions needing an extra pull to engage it back properly but the Canon may be OK in this respect and larger.

Something worth mentioning but it depends on people's preferences. I suppose Canon may get the auto deploy one in the next iteration if ever. I will wait for that.

Too funny. I'm a left-eye dominant glasses wearing shooter

I do love EVFs... Or OVFs, either will do but I prefer EVFs for their advantages (exposure simulation). I'm an old school DSLR-shooter so I'm hooked on some form of traditional framing even though I've relaxed a bit and use the touchscreen more frequently these days, old habit die hard (framing in an EVF/OVF).

My bigger compliant is I occasionally accidentally tap the touchscreen while EVF is engaged and have to cancel. You get used to it. Happens on my larger cameras (EOS R) too, but more frequently on the G5X Mark II if that's what you're asking.

I do wonder sometimes if I should have got the Mk II for the lens but the G5x does and it has the extra AF Frame selector button which is useful and the front dial. I do not think the hump and the look of it as regards portability made it much of a seller and not for the RAW user wanting speed. The Mk I always looks bigger in photos than it actually is.

The G5X Mark I is a camera I looked at many, many times, just like the RX100's.

IMO, if you're after a DSLR form factor, and want to upgrade? G1X Mark III. The DIGIC6 on the G5X Mark I is it's Achilles heel and I doubt Canon will do another DSLR-like G5 series. It'll be RX100 doppelgangers from here on out for the G5Xs...

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Rohith Thumati Contributing Member • Posts: 690
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

Quite effective. I haven't mentioned it because it's an assumption (that is works and is commensurate with other cameras/systems - it is btw).

I haven't tested how far it goes down to, I can if you're curious... I have very shaky hands so IS or a faster shutter is in fact required for caffeine guzzlers like myself

IS is just making sure my shots come out crispy (for me) or making sure I don't blow my ISO out of the water at times when I want to maintain a longer focal but dial down the shutter to something more reasonable. Other folks like to use it as a quasi tripod, I don't. I've found point and shoots IS systems aren't good enough for that sort of thing, but I can try. I'm not the best candidate to test that though due to my coffee habit truth told if that's what you're after but can report back with best shutter that's in focus.

Thanks!

i currently use an LX100 II and an E-M5 II, and have used a number of other cameras/systems over the years, and I’ve found the variance in IS effectiveness to be really quite wide. I’ve found the LX100’s to be able to give me a 1 stop (sometimes 2) slower shutter speed than the typical 1/focal length (in full frame equivalent terms) rule of thumb, while I can get 4-5 stops of IS with my E-M5 II. I don’t have the steadiest hands in the world either, so good to know that you find it effective.

Rock and Rollei Senior Member • Posts: 2,294
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

I've always been a fan of quality compact cameras. Back in film days, I used to have something like a Rollei 35S or Olymlus XA, and through digital, I've been through a progression of Ixus and Powershot S models before ending up with a G9X. I've used them to carry when I've not had a system camera with me, for location scouting for landscapes and pro job, family snaps, and relatively serious work. Pocketable has always been key.

But over the last 3 years, I've hardly used it. It's been squeezed by the EOS M6 from one direction and my smartphone from the other.

At least part of that is my fault. I made the wrong choice. The G9X is a lovely little camera, but I stressed the pocketable angle too much over IQ, influenced by the fact that I always used the S90 more than the G11. The G7X would have been a better choice for me.

So to today - I do keep wondering if I should replace the G9X. But at least I am sure that if I did, the G5X II would be the right choice, so thank you.

 Rock and Rollei's gear list:Rock and Rollei's gear list
Canon EOS 5DS R Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EOS R Canon EOS M6 II Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM +29 more
(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 1,455
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

AllFlawed wrote:

RLight wrote:

AllFlawed wrote:

You have to like corner EVFs which I do not like myself especially being left eye dominant in addition to the nuisance of having to deploy and them pull them back. The original G5X Mk is an extremely comfortable camera to use and having had a Sony HX90 I would not want one of these pop up EVFs myself again as a lot of time was wasted on occasions needing an extra pull to engage it back properly but the Canon may be OK in this respect and larger.

Something worth mentioning but it depends on people's preferences. I suppose Canon may get the auto deploy one in the next iteration if ever. I will wait for that.

Too funny. I'm a left-eye dominant glasses wearing shooter

I do love EVFs... Or OVFs, either will do but I prefer EVFs for their advantages (exposure simulation). I'm an old school DSLR-shooter so I'm hooked on some form of traditional framing even though I've relaxed a bit and use the touchscreen more frequently these days, old habit die hard (framing in an EVF/OVF).

My bigger compliant is I occasionally accidentally tap the touchscreen while EVF is engaged and have to cancel. You get used to it. Happens on my larger cameras (EOS R) too, but more frequently on the G5X Mark II if that's what you're asking.

I do wonder sometimes if I should have got the Mk II for the lens but the G5x does and it has the extra AF Frame selector button which is useful and the front dial. I do not think the hump and the look of it as regards portability made it much of a seller and not for the RAW user wanting speed. The Mk I always looks bigger in photos than it actually is.

The G5X Mark I is a camera I looked at many, many times, just like the RX100's.

IMO, if you're after a DSLR form factor, and want to upgrade? G1X Mark III. The DIGIC6 on the G5X Mark I is it's Achilles heel and I doubt Canon will do another DSLR-like G5 series. It'll be RX100 doppelgangers from here on out for the G5Xs...

I would never go so far as recommending the Mk I. The Mk II seems a big improvement and the Mk I shape probably just did not sell.

The 200mm RX100s do have an appeal When the Mk LXIV comes out I may just get one of the discounted Mk VIs if still around. If anyone can tell Sony where the off buttons are for any of their current cameras lines they would love to hear from you as it much be as confusing for them as for us what each particular implementation of the type does.

OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Rock and Rollei wrote:

I've always been a fan of quality compact cameras. Back in film days, I used to have something like a Rollei 35S or Olymlus XA, and through digital, I've been through a progression of Ixus and Powershot S models before ending up with a G9X. I've used them to carry when I've not had a system camera with me, for location scouting for landscapes and pro job, family snaps, and relatively serious work. Pocketable has always been key.

But over the last 3 years, I've hardly used it. It's been squeezed by the EOS M6 from one direction and my smartphone from the other.

At least part of that is my fault. I made the wrong choice. The G9X is a lovely little camera, but I stressed the pocketable angle too much over IQ, influenced by the fact that I always used the S90 more than the G11. The G7X would have been a better choice for me.

So to today - I do keep wondering if I should replace the G9X. But at least I am sure that if I did, the G5X II would be the right choice, so thank you.

What you're doing is in fact no different than the approach I took; small point and shoot on one end, large mirrorless on the other. Except, you're using a smartphone on one end with an M6 on the other, that's actually a pretty smart move. Probably "smarter" than my move. But it really depends on your needs/wants and what you're willing to accept in size and cost.

I don't think there's a right or wrong answer here. G9X is a wonderful option, but if it's not getting used, perhaps you'd be wise to sell it and buy another lens for the M system?

BTW, I haven't written off returning to the M system someday. But, things would have to change e.g. lenses I want would need to exist for the system in conjunction with IBIS to address the wonderful 22mm being less than appropriate for video indoors (no IS). If Canon made a fast 22, IBIS, and a faster normal zoom, I'd consider returning.

This is a journey for me but I'll say the G5X Mark II is a wonderful stop. I think you'd enjoy it if you needed to either upsize your smartphone, or downsize your M6 but if what you have is working (sounds like yes to me), don't change a thing.

What I've got between the R, RF 35, 24-240 and G5X II, is working really well.

I think the journey matters more than the gear. Shooting, is what counts. And don't be set that it has to be a given camera that's "the end". But likewise, don't be set that you have to have something else for it to be "the end". There will always be something new. Now for some of us like myself, we jump around a little more than others

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
ElusivePhoton
ElusivePhoton New Member • Posts: 11
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

RLight wrote:

But, where I'd say to consider the Sony RX100 is for the VI or VII and you want a pocket sports shooter. 200mm, even though slower in aperture, plus the phase detect Sony AF is where that makes sense. But for anything else / you plan on shooting sports less than other things? You guessed it, G5X Mark II is the smarter choice.

If photographing the landscape out of a car on a highway, or out of a fast train, is one of the use cases, does the G5X mkII do poorly?  I assume it's not as good as the RX100 mkVII but does it match a G7X mkII ?  (I am currently considering the G5X mkII and the G7X mkIII, though I'm afraid to ask about autofocus on the latter.)

OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)
1

ElusivePhoton wrote:

RLight wrote:

But, where I'd say to consider the Sony RX100 is for the VI or VII and you want a pocket sports shooter. 200mm, even though slower in aperture, plus the phase detect Sony AF is where that makes sense. But for anything else / you plan on shooting sports less than other things? You guessed it, G5X Mark II is the smarter choice.

If photographing the landscape out of a car on a highway, or out of a fast train, is one of the use cases, does the G5X mkII do poorly? I assume it's not as good as the RX100 mkVII but does it match a G7X mkII ? (I am currently considering the G5X mkII and the G7X mkIII, though I'm afraid to ask about autofocus on the latter.)

It exceeds the G7X Mark II.

I've done what you've described, without issue.

Shutter speed becomes a bigger problem; in fast moving objects like cars and trains, use 1/500 or faster.

Single shot AF may be useful in these cases, too.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)
3

ElusivePhoton wrote:

RLight wrote:

But, where I'd say to consider the Sony RX100 is for the VI or VII and you want a pocket sports shooter. 200mm, even though slower in aperture, plus the phase detect Sony AF is where that makes sense. But for anything else / you plan on shooting sports less than other things? You guessed it, G5X Mark II is the smarter choice.

If photographing the landscape out of a car on a highway, or out of a fast train, is one of the use cases, does the G5X mkII do poorly? I assume it's not as good as the RX100 mkVII but does it match a G7X mkII ? (I am currently considering the G5X mkII and the G7X mkIII, though I'm afraid to ask about autofocus on the latter.)

SOOC, Small JPEG

Hope this answers the question.

Driving to work. Auto Mode used.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
ElusivePhoton
ElusivePhoton New Member • Posts: 11
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

Thank you -- if the autofocus exceeds the G7X mk II, that sounds good. (I assume your sample photo was taken well over like 30 mph.)

I don't really take videos much at all (and if I do I don't need the highest resolution), but does the G5X mk II have any overheating issues in video mode like the G7X mk III reportedly did? I actually would be interested in trying it out as a webcam occasionally, using the Windows webcam software announced in the spring, so I guess that would mean it's in video mode for long periods of time (although it wouldn't be writing to memory).

OP RLight Senior Member • Posts: 3,019
Re: For the weary pro (pocket)

ElusivePhoton wrote:

Thank you -- if the autofocus exceeds the G7X mk II, that sounds good. (I assume your sample photo was taken well over like 30 mph.)

I don't really take videos much at all (and if I do I don't need the highest resolution), but does the G5X mk II have any overheating issues in video mode like the G7X mk III reportedly did? I actually would be interested in trying it out as a webcam occasionally, using the Windows webcam software announced in the spring, so I guess that would mean it's in video mode for long periods of time (although it wouldn't be writing to memory).

I personally haven't experienced any overheating, however I don't shoot alot of video. I've shot several minutes of 4K without issue but I don't think I've shot more than 7 minutes, that was in hot (95F) conditions though, and I didn't have any problems.

That shot was around 20MPH actually, just passed a stop sign; I had taken several shots before it too though that came out well which were at 60MPH, but I preferred the composition of the light and the road just passing the stop sign. I found it harder to shoot out the window while driving (as the driver), the camera itself didn't have a problem, I just have to pay attention to the road and estimated my shoot, I couldn't pay attention to what was in the LCD/EVF so this shot was a bit of blind luck.

 RLight's gear list:RLight's gear list
Canon G1 X III Canon EOS R Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3
Rambow Contributing Member • Posts: 850
I don`t buy it

I don`t trust the overly enthusiastic tone of this "review". It`s more of a presentation, really. BUT, i`ve studied the images and can say this:

-The button design and controls appears to be superior to a rx camera.

-The colors are better than sony`s(applicable to any other brand).

-The lens appears to be very sharp.

-It is made in Japan.

The only obvious drawback to this camera as i see it is the price. The official price in my country is more than $1000. What the...? Canon copies a sony rx100 camera and they want for it as much as a rx100 VII goes for? That`s just cheeky.

I had a look on the used market as well and found one locally for around $420. That`s reasonable, actually. However deals like that will be rare simply because canon definitely won`t sell many of these, so there are less cameras ending up on ebay and such.

My personal conclusion- probably a nice camera, as long as the price is right. Coincidently, the same applies for any rx100 camera.

No pocket camera ever is worth $1000, these cameras aren`t even weather/shock resistant.

 Rambow's gear list:Rambow's gear list
Sony Mavica FD-71
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