Negative drying after Developing help please

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Autonerd Contributing Member • Posts: 604
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

Grh81 wrote:

dont use the squeegie, but it seems the water isnt running off quick enough and the drying quicker than it can run away, so maybe ill next to use some form of squeegeing?

Just use patience.

Aaron

DenWil
DenWil Veteran Member • Posts: 4,274
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

Grh81 wrote:

Hi all,

Well thank you for all your help and advice so far.

Its such tricky one with so many different recommendations.

So tonight, I have just developed a 35mm roll, final wash in distilled water with rinse-aid, and shook out and hung straight up.

So will see in the morning if the rinse aid has managed to push all the water off or will there be run and streak marks rather than squeegie scratches?

Ill let you all know tomorrow.

The general consensous seems to be dont use the squeegie, but it seems the water isnt running off quick enough and the drying quicker than it can run away, so maybe ill next to use some form of squeegeing?

Ill have to keep practicing, but film isnt cheap!

I process three 120  reels in a tank at a time.

After washing  I  pull each tank out  and dunk it in an old single reel tank  full of photoFlo  and  distilled water.  I have hangers that are fitted with three clamps  and as I take  the reels out of the solution  they are hung on the hanger side by side.

As each one goes up I  stick my wet fingers  middle/index into a scissor position and run down the hanging roll of fill. It just removes all the excess and since my fingers are wet with the same solution some how I 've never scratched  the film.

I use a shower stall   which has been sealed off for absolute cleanliness and zero air flow.  Takes about 6 hours for the film to be ready for sleeving.

When i first started processing film the facility had a trying cabinet and  it was a nightmare of dust. Started bringing the wet film home  and never had another problem.

Cheers.

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dw

jaeae Regular Member • Posts: 223
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

I'm no expert (developed something like 15 rolls of film now), but my personal experience has been that there will always be some drying/runoff marks - no difference if I used wetting agent or rubber drier blade.

I noticed that the matte emulsion side usually is fine. The marks are visible on the shiny backing. So i just breath on the film strips a bit and clean the marks with microfibre cloth. If needed.

mamallama
mamallama Forum Pro • Posts: 58,312
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

jaeae wrote:

I'm no expert (developed something like 15 rolls of film now), but my personal experience has been that there will always be some drying/runoff marks - no difference if I used wetting agent or rubber drier blade.

I noticed that the matte emulsion side usually is fine. The marks are visible on the shiny backing. So i just breath on the film strips a bit and clean the marks with microfibre cloth. If needed.

Are the marks whitish? Are you sure that all your darkroom water is not calcium hard?  Have you tested your water hardness? I can see if you have very hard water in the darkroom calcium residue may be difficult to avoid. It could be pervasive. I only used filtered and soften house tap water in all the water needs in my darkroom for mixing chemicals and washing and used Kodak Photo-Flo 200 according to instructions and never had any spotty drying problems.

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Autonerd Contributing Member • Posts: 604
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

Speaking of showers and dust... I read or heard somewhere that it's a good idea to run the shower for a few minutes to get the dust to settle. That's what I do before developing and haven't had too much of a dust problem.

Our shower is open at the top but that hasn't been a problem. Patience is my drying agent.

Aaron

Michael Firstlight Veteran Member • Posts: 3,965
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

Kodak Photoflo - it's the choice of the ages by the vast majority of folks that develop film - tried and true. Then while the film is still on on the reel, spin the reel in a salad spinner (I'm not kidding- it's a great inexpensive trick: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B076HZ5283 /ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 This removes most of the remaining water from the film surface.

That is all you need.

Now to take it even further...

Of course make sure you dry in a dust-free place. Some hang their film in the shower. I wanted a real film drying cabinet but couldn't afford one (they are big, heavy, and cost a fortune), so I made my own by buying a Prinz film drying head (they come up often on eBay and are not as expensive as the Jobo Mistrals), and I hung the dryer head from the top bar of a narrow portable zip-up clothing closet I got at one of the home improvement stores. I even taped a replaceable filter on the bottom of the portable clothes closet so that dust couldn't get in from the base. It's was certainly a DIY, but every bit as effective as a professional film drying cabinet.

And some of us go even further off the reservation...

If you ever become totally obsessed about having zero dust and want obtain near-clean-room status, then get a heppa air purifier for the room (like a small Honeywell). And, if you become totally OCD about it all, then get a small ionizing air blower that eliminates static electricity (the air purifier picks up everything since nothing sticks to anything with the ionozer). This is what some of the most hard-core film folks do.

MFL

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The one thing everyone can agree on is that film photography has its negatives. It even has its positives and internegatives.

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jaeae Regular Member • Posts: 223
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

mamallama wrote:

jaeae wrote:

I'm no expert (developed something like 15 rolls of film now), but my personal experience has been that there will always be some drying/runoff marks - no difference if I used wetting agent or rubber drier blade.

I noticed that the matte emulsion side usually is fine. The marks are visible on the shiny backing. So i just breath on the film strips a bit and clean the marks with microfibre cloth. If needed.

Are the marks whitish? Are you sure that all your darkroom water is not calcium hard? Have you tested your water hardness? I can see if you have very hard water in the darkroom calcium residue may be difficult to avoid. It could be pervasive. I only used filtered and soften house tap water in all the water needs in my darkroom for mixing chemicals and washing and used Kodak Photo-Flo 200 according to instructions and never had any spotty drying problems.

I use a photo club darkroom and the water lines have filters, but I don''t know do they do anything about the calcium. It's possible that the water is quite hard. The marks are not super whitish, just so that when you look at the film mirroring to some light, you see them. They are usually not visible because I use diffuser enlarger but if I used condenser type I thing they would be noticeable.

Neil-O Regular Member • Posts: 427
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

I haven't done any home processing for many years, but when I did pretty much everyone used Calgon in the final rinse.  I did and certainly never had a problem with drying marks or streaks.

Tomm111 Contributing Member • Posts: 718
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

jaeae wrote:

mamallama wrote:

jaeae wrote:

I'm no expert (developed something like 15 rolls of film now), but my personal experience has been that there will always be some drying/runoff marks - no difference if I used wetting agent or rubber drier blade.

I noticed that the matte emulsion side usually is fine. The marks are visible on the shiny backing. So i just breath on the film strips a bit and clean the marks with microfibre cloth. If needed.

Are the marks whitish? Are you sure that all your darkroom water is not calcium hard? Have you tested your water hardness? I can see if you have very hard water in the darkroom calcium residue may be difficult to avoid. It could be pervasive. I only used filtered and soften house tap water in all the water needs in my darkroom for mixing chemicals and washing and used Kodak Photo-Flo 200 according to instructions and never had any spotty drying problems.

I use a photo club darkroom and the water lines have filters, but I don''t know do they do anything about the calcium. It's possible that the water is quite hard. The marks are not super whitish, just so that when you look at the film mirroring to some light, you see them. They are usually not visible because I use diffuser enlarger but if I used condenser type I thing they would be noticeable.

You may want to ask them how often they change the filter(s). When I worked with a lab, filters were changed weekly, filters were fairly dirty, not worrisome, in my home darkroom (last one I had) I changed filters every couple of months, and they were still fairly clean. Our town water department said they ran filters out of the wells if they didn't we'd have sludge in the water. The lab was the next town over from where my home was. All depends what is in the town water.

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mamallama
mamallama Forum Pro • Posts: 58,312
Re: Negative drying after Developing help please

jaeae wrote:

mamallama wrote:

jaeae wrote:

I'm no expert (developed something like 15 rolls of film now), but my personal experience has been that there will always be some drying/runoff marks - no difference if I used wetting agent or rubber drier blade.

I noticed that the matte emulsion side usually is fine. The marks are visible on the shiny backing. So i just breath on the film strips a bit and clean the marks with microfibre cloth. If needed.

Are the marks whitish? Are you sure that all your darkroom water is not calcium hard? Have you tested your water hardness? I can see if you have very hard water in the darkroom calcium residue may be difficult to avoid. It could be pervasive. I only used filtered and soften house tap water in all the water needs in my darkroom for mixing chemicals and washing and used Kodak Photo-Flo 200 according to instructions and never had any spotty drying problems.

I use a photo club darkroom and the water lines have filters, but I don''t know do they do anything about the calcium. It's possible that the water is quite hard. The marks are not super whitish, just so that when you look at the film mirroring to some light, you see them. They are usually not visible because I use diffuser enlarger but if I used condenser type I thing they would be noticeable.

The calcium in hard water is in solution and is not filtered out by a water filter. It is usually removed with a water softner. Water hardness is usually measured in calcium grains in parts per gallon. There are simple ways to estimate the hardness using soap in water but the municipal water company can sometimes tell you the hardness of the water they supply. Here is some information about water hardness.

https://www.bing.com/search?q=water+hardness+scale&form=EDGSPH&mkt=en-us&httpsmsn=1&msnews=1&rec_search=1&plvar=0&refig=3a0b703bd1b74828a6f7a08681ce7f15&sp=2&ghc=1&qs=LS&pq=water+hardness&sk=LS1&sc=8-14&cvid=3a0b703bd1b74828a6f7a08681ce7f15&cc=US&setlang=en-US

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