GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

Started 5 months ago | Discussions
icor1031
icor1031 Regular Member • Posts: 367
GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

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JimKasson
JimKasson Forum Pro • Posts: 29,568
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost
2

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV?

Why would it?

Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

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Erik Kaffehr
Erik Kaffehr Veteran Member • Posts: 4,459
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost
2

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

Hi,

You can't know. The Canon 5D has been around for a very long time. It is in it's fourth generation. So, Canon has probably been being fixing problems for four generations. They have a lot of experience.

Fujifilm has also made cameras for a long time. So, the GFX 50 is a new product, but also based on a lot of experience.

The GFX is a very simple design. That means less adjustments and fewer things to go wrong. But it is also new technology.

Just to say, if you take some care of your gear, you may not need any repair. I was shooting Minolta/Sony/Hasselblad/Phase One for fifty years. My repair history:

  • Used Minolta XD7, several repairs, mostly fixed by myself. Bad design.
  • Konica Minolta A2, non working macro switch, fixed on warranty.
  • Konica Minolta 17-35 zoom, bad sharpness across part of the image. Lens OK according to KM repair service. KM obviously having different tolerances than mine.
  • Minolta 80-200/2.8 APO AF, bayonet change. Bayonet coming loose. Like 150$US.

So, I spent like 150$US since 1970 and having very few failures. But your mileage may vary.
Also, there are bad designs around. All systems are not created equal.

Best regards

Erik

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icor1031
OP icor1031 Regular Member • Posts: 367
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

Erik Kaffehr wrote:

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

Hi,

You can't know. The Canon 5D has been around for a very long time. It is in it's fourth generation. So, Canon has probably been being fixing problems for four generations. They have a lot of experience.

Fujifilm has also made cameras for a long time. So, the GFX 50 is a new product, but also based on a lot of experience.

The GFX is a very simple design. That means less adjustments and fewer things to go wrong. But it is also new technology.

Just to say, if you take some care of your gear, you may not need any repair. I was shooting Minolta/Sony/Hasselblad/Phase One for fifty years. My repair history:

  • Used Minolta XD7, several repairs, mostly fixed by myself. Bad design.
  • Konica Minolta A2, non working macro switch, fixed on warranty.
  • Konica Minolta 17-35 zoom, bad sharpness across part of the image. Lens OK according to KM repair service. KM obviously having different tolerances than mine.
  • Minolta 80-200/2.8 APO AF, bayonet change. Bayonet coming loose. Like 150$US.

So, I spent like 150$US since 1970 and having very few failures. But your mileage may vary.
Also, there are bad designs around. All systems are not created equal.

Best regards

Erik

That's not bad, maybe I will aim to get a 50S.

 icor1031's gear list:icor1031's gear list
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matteroner
matteroner Contributing Member • Posts: 701
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost
1

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

What do you want to achieve with the gfx that you can't do now? Thats really the question you need to ask. Then you need to ask how much is that "______"worth per shoot.

 matteroner's gear list:matteroner's gear list
Canon EOS 80D Canon EOS 6D Canon EOS 400D Fujifilm GFX 50R Canon EF 35mm F1.4L USM +13 more
icor1031
OP icor1031 Regular Member • Posts: 367
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

matteroner wrote:

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

What do you want to achieve with the gfx that you can't do now? Thats really the question you need to ask. Then you need to ask how much is that "______"worth per shoot.

My goal is to get the 100. I'm trying to decide whether I want to use the 50S as a stepping stone, because then I can purchase lenses for the GFX systems and not have to purchase any more for the EF systems while waiting to get the funds for the 100.

 icor1031's gear list:icor1031's gear list
Canon EOS 5DS Carl Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 2/135 Zeiss Otus 85mm F1.4 Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art Tamron SP 35mm F1.4 Di USD +2 more
Velocity of Sound
Velocity of Sound Contributing Member • Posts: 937
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost
2

For what it's worth, I bought my GFX from a wedding shooter who was going back to "full frame." I didn't ask them for the full details of why, but part of it had to do with overall speed of operation. They were a bit sad about making the switch, as they felt that the image quality from the GFX was better. But at the end of the day wedding photos aren't about the ultimate quality, they're about getting the shot from the right place at the right moment, right? From a fully business point of view, I'd probably stick with the proven "full frame" systems that offer the most flexibility in terms of lens load out, body styles, and speed of operation. You can still mash away with the GFX system (I admit I'm not a very disciplined shooter and was hoping the GFX would force me to slow down, but despite some of the critical reviews, it's still mostly able to keep up with my bad habits), and the GFX 100 is probably even faster, but... again, if you're buying for business as opposed to buying for personal pleasure, one of the other systems might make your life a bit easier (and be more economical).

 Velocity of Sound's gear list:Velocity of Sound's gear list
Olympus E-M1 II Fujifilm GFX 50S Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 Olympus 25mm F1.2 Olympus 17mm F1.2 Pro +10 more
icor1031
OP icor1031 Regular Member • Posts: 367
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

Velocity of Sound wrote:

For what it's worth, I bought my GFX from a wedding shooter who was going back to "full frame." I didn't ask them for the full details of why, but part of it had to do with overall speed of operation. They were a bit sad about making the switch, as they felt that the image quality from the GFX was better. But at the end of the day wedding photos aren't about the ultimate quality, they're about getting the shot from the right place at the right moment, right? From a fully business point of view, I'd probably stick with the proven "full frame" systems that offer the most flexibility in terms of lens load out, body styles, and speed of operation. You can still mash away with the GFX system (I admit I'm not a very disciplined shooter and was hoping the GFX would force me to slow down, but despite some of the critical reviews, it's still mostly able to keep up with my bad habits), and the GFX 100 is probably even faster, but... again, if you're buying for business as opposed to buying for personal pleasure, one of the other systems might make your life a bit easier (and be more economical).

Thanks, I wasn't aware of that.

I'd be buying for both purposes, but business is first. Given that full-frame bodies are superior and much cheaper, it seems that I should stay with those for weddings. And in this case, I suspect that I'll skip the 50 and go straight to the 100, which I want for non-wedding portraits and maybe landscapes.

Although by the time I save for it, maybe there will be a 200 by Fuji.

 icor1031's gear list:icor1031's gear list
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karlgoethebier
karlgoethebier Forum Member • Posts: 80
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

O.K. I‘m not in it for the money. I‘m just an average amateur. But common sense tells me that it probably might be the better investment to buy a second body for some full frame or APS-C system. And a second flash as well as a second standard zoom might also be a good idea. Just to have a fallback if some bad things happen.  Because of "No Hands no Cookies". Best regards

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matteroner
matteroner Contributing Member • Posts: 701
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost
1

icor1031 wrote:

matteroner wrote:

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

What do you want to achieve with the gfx that you can't do now? Thats really the question you need to ask. Then you need to ask how much is that "______"worth per shoot.

My goal is to get the 100. I'm trying to decide whether I want to use the 50S as a stepping stone, because then I can purchase lenses for the GFX systems and not have to purchase any more for the EF systems while waiting to get the funds for the 100.

Again, even with the 100, you have to ask yourself how do I monetize this purchase. My guess is 2 things. 1 cropability. 2 adding high res video clips. And maybe 3 shallow depth of field shots might garner some edge.

Do the numbers and see if it is worth it. If you can immediately increase your fee 10% because of the features it brings, then it might be worth it. But I don't know your usiness and what your current margins are. I would also consider financing it with a business loan. Then it doesn't kill your cash flow as much and you can generally write off the interest.

 matteroner's gear list:matteroner's gear list
Canon EOS 80D Canon EOS 6D Canon EOS 400D Fujifilm GFX 50R Canon EF 35mm F1.4L USM +13 more
Velocity of Sound
Velocity of Sound Contributing Member • Posts: 937
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

matteroner wrote:

Again, even with the 100, you have to ask yourself how do I monetize this purchase. My guess is 2 things. 1 cropability. 2 adding high res video clips. And maybe 3 shallow depth of field shots might garner some edge.

Cropability is a definite consideration.  I've seen some GFX 100 users remark that you can take one exposure and basically have multiple photos from it.  Their examples showed that it was true, and it was very impressive.  Even for me, the GFX 50S crop potential is really shocking.  Coming from a 20 megapixel camera before the GFX 50S, being able to crop so much of the frame and realize that the resolution still exceeds 20 megapixels blows me away every time.

Video may be a bit iffy - the camera is capable, but some reviewers have remarked on a strong "jello effect" with movement.  Certain "full frame" cameras are bound to be better for video.

Shallow DoF is a tricky one.  If you're sticking purely with native lenses, you can actually go more shallow with current "full frame" cameras.  This may change as Fuji releases more wide-aperture lenses.  Adapt a lens like the Sigma Art 105mm f/1.4 and it's true that, for the same framing, you'll have a more shallow DoF with the GFX... but then you're adapting a lens.  There are "smart" adapters so that you can adapt lenses and still have autofocus, and it sounds as if the performance penalty isn't horrible.  But again, if you're working in a fast-paced environment where every second could count, I'd be nervous to be relying on a solution like that.

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Chris Dodkin
MOD Chris Dodkin Forum Pro • Posts: 12,786
Invest in the future, not the past
2

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

Look at it another way.

Why would you want to spend any more money on a dead end system like EOS?

The EF mount is done, the new R mount will get all of Canon's R&D money moving forward.

You are throwing money at an old camera system, and a legacy DSLR body - when you should be looking to mirrorless and a new lens system with a bright future.

GFX is a mirrorless system, so you're already going to be in a better position shooting any natural light wedding work - WYSIWYG EVF can't be bettered for this.

GFX is high resolution giving you stunning IQ and more crop-ability for final prints.

GFX has an industry leading lens system that will outperform all of your L series glass - I know, I've owned most of both. You can review my equipment lists on DPR.

GFX 50S and R are superb wedding machines - not the spray and pray kind of wedding shooter, the professional, considered, jaw dropping image kind of wedding shooter, who can demand a higher fee and who gets more orders for prints and albums.

I have enjoyed shooting weddings with both, and the clients are ecstatic with the quality of the resulting images.

It also critically upgrades you the photographer, to really focus on your technique to deliver world class images.

It separates you from the competition, and becomes a USP for your business.

Now's the time to move from EF - in fact three years ago was the time, but now will do just fine.

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Your time is limited, so don't waste it arguing about camera features - go out and capture memories - Oh, and size does matter - shoot MF

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Snap Happy Senior Member • Posts: 1,212
Surely....
1

...if you're running this as a business, then you should be mitigating the impact of any camera being out of action, for any reason, not just because they might develop a fault, but accidental damage, fire, theft etc.

Suitable mitigations might be:

  1. Buy (or lease) a second identical body.
  2. Have a 2nd system, not necessarily the same, in the car as a backup. May be keeping some of the kit you plan to replace is an option?
  3. Identify a reliable (and if possible, local) hire outfit and make sure you are 'good-to-go' with them, as the checks that some rental places will want to do on a first hire can take some time.
  4. Insure your gear, plus have cover for any gear you hire, plus the costs of hiring it.

1 through 4 aren't mutually exclusive. Whether you choose none, one or more than one just depends on your appetite for risk and the potential impact to your reputation and business should you not be able to satisfy your client.

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Tim
timtuckerphotography.com

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icor1031
OP icor1031 Regular Member • Posts: 367
Re: Invest in the future, not the past

Chris Dodkin wrote:

icor1031 wrote:

I'm considering using a GFX 50S to shoot weddings, but only if it's cost effective. Should I expect that it would last twice as long as a 5D Mark IV? Or that repair costs would not be substantial?

Using ebay, the price of the GFX is roughly double.

Look at it another way.

Why would you want to spend any more money on a dead end system like EOS?

The EF mount is done, the new R mount will get all of Canon's R&D money moving forward.

You are throwing money at an old camera system, and a legacy DSLR body - when you should be looking to mirrorless and a new lens system with a bright future.

GFX is a mirrorless system, so you're already going to be in a better position shooting any natural light wedding work - WYSIWYG EVF can't be bettered for this.

GFX is high resolution giving you stunning IQ and more crop-ability for final prints.

GFX has an industry leading lens system that will outperform all of your L series glass - I know, I've owned most of both. You can review my equipment lists on DPR.

GFX 50S and R are superb wedding machines - not the spray and pray kind of wedding shooter, the professional, considered, jaw dropping image kind of wedding shooter, who can demand a higher fee and who gets more orders for prints and albums.

I have enjoyed shooting weddings with both, and the clients are ecstatic with the quality of the resulting images.

It also critically upgrades you the photographer, to really focus on your technique to deliver world class images.

It separates you from the competition, and becomes a USP for your business.

Now's the time to move from EF - in fact three years ago was the time, but now will do just fine.

I wish I was shooting my own weddings, but I'm doing contract work and have to capture no less than 600 per event.

As far as I'm aware, EF adapts to R without issue. Is that not correct?

 icor1031's gear list:icor1031's gear list
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Chris Dodkin
MOD Chris Dodkin Forum Pro • Posts: 12,786
Re: Invest in the future, not the past
1

icor1031 wrote:

I wish I was shooting my own weddings, but I'm doing contract work and have to capture no less than 600 per event.

As far as I'm aware, EF adapts to R without issue. Is that not correct?

Depends what you mean by no issue.

The quality of image from an EF mount lens is limited by the mount design/optics - R mount lenses are significantly better, so there's the #1 issue right there sticking with EOS.

AF abilities of an adapted lens etc, can't comment.

GF series lenses are next gen compared to EF - by a considerable margin.

One of the key reasons to move to GFX - lenses outlast bodies.

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Your time is limited, so don't waste it arguing about camera features - go out and capture memories - Oh, and size does matter - shoot MF

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icor1031
OP icor1031 Regular Member • Posts: 367
Re: Invest in the future, not the past

Chris Dodkin wrote:

icor1031 wrote:

I wish I was shooting my own weddings, but I'm doing contract work and have to capture no less than 600 per event.

As far as I'm aware, EF adapts to R without issue. Is that not correct?

Depends what you mean by no issue.

The quality of image from an EF mount lens is limited by the mount design/optics - R mount lenses are significantly better, so there's the #1 issue right there sticking with EOS.

AF abilities of an adapted lens etc, can't comment.

GF series lenses are next gen compared to EF - by a considerable margin.

One of the key reasons to move to GFX - lenses outlast bodies.

Thanks for clarifying. On ebay, the EOS R is even cheaper than the 5d Mk IV, so this is no loss.

I hope it won't be too long until I can also get the GFX100.

 icor1031's gear list:icor1031's gear list
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Erik Kaffehr
Erik Kaffehr Veteran Member • Posts: 4,459
Re: Invest in the future, not the past

icor1031 wrote:

Chris Dodkin wrote:

icor1031 wrote:

I wish I was shooting my own weddings, but I'm doing contract work and have to capture no less than 600 per event.

As far as I'm aware, EF adapts to R without issue. Is that not correct?

Depends what you mean by no issue.

The quality of image from an EF mount lens is limited by the mount design/optics - R mount lenses are significantly better, so there's the #1 issue right there sticking with EOS.

AF abilities of an adapted lens etc, can't comment.

GF series lenses are next gen compared to EF - by a considerable margin.

One of the key reasons to move to GFX - lenses outlast bodies.

Thanks for clarifying. On ebay, the EOS R is even cheaper than the 5d Mk IV, so this is no loss.

I hope it won't be too long until I can also get the GFX100.

Hi,

I wouldn't be categorical about Canon lenses. Canon has revamped most of it's lens line. Just as an example, the Canon 16-35/2.8LIII is hugely improved over the 16-35/2.8 LII. The 85/1.4L is a great lens. The 11-24/4L seems to be pretty fantastic.

Clearly, Canon focuses it's design efforts on the R-system, that has few lenses. For the R-system they have some interesting lenses, like the 85/1.2, 28-70/2.0 and super compact 70-200/2.8. There is little reason to develop new lenses for the EF mount as there are plenty great lenses.

But, all full frame EOS lenses can be used with an adapter and that adapter is essentially just an extension tube. It is different than converting from Canon to Sony.
Canon cameras used to have low DR at base ISO, due to old technology CMOS, but that has changed with the 5DIV, X1DII and 80D. They may still be a bit behind Sony, but not so far behind. (Sony makes the sensor for both Fujifilm and Nikon).
We will see a higher resolution sensor or two real soon now.

Naturally, the GFX system has some advantages, due to sensor size. In many cases the 4x3 aspect ratio works better than 3:2 aspect ratio on 24x36. But if your images tend to be more square than rectangular than you may need like 60MP to achieve the same detail on 24x36 mm as 50 MP on 33x44 mm.
The GFX 50 models don't have on sensor PDAF. Canon sensors have 'dual pixel auto focus', that can use any pixel for AF.

The Canon R5 is said to have in body image stabilisation, which the GFX 50 models don't have.

I would agree that the future will be mirrorless and also that the new R-mount lenses are not just great but also expensive.

You can switch over to the Canon R system gradually. Switching to Fujifilm is a larger step.

Best regards

Erik

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iRanN
iRanN Contributing Member • Posts: 525
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost

I occasionally bring my GFx 50r to use at weddings, it’s a challenge but someone super comfortable with a couple of bodies can certainly use them as their main system for weddings. Someone already mentioned the speed operation is the main issue also the lag in between the shots, forget it for walking down the isle, for that I have a Sony A9 that’s on the other end of the spectrum, I need to dial to lower frames per second and nails focus for on every single shot.

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Chris Dodkin
MOD Chris Dodkin Forum Pro • Posts: 12,786
Re: GFX 50S Durability / Repair Cost
2

iRanN wrote:

forget it for walking down the isle

Nope

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Your time is limited, so don't waste it arguing about camera features - go out and capture memories - Oh, and size does matter - shoot MF

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Lobbamobba Contributing Member • Posts: 514
Re: Invest in the future, not the past
1

That is correct, EF lenses works flawlessly on RF giving Canon the biggest and most affordable mirrorless lens line in the world.

I would think twice about GFX for weddings. I never shoot them myself but I do shoot at long events and in similar low light. I enjoy shooting GFX but would not use it for that type of work. AF speed/accuracy and battery wouldn't be fun in those situations.

Professionally I mostly use an EOS-R since it can switch between photo and video faster than any other camera. But all my colleagues are still on DSLRs. And if we are honest there is nothing a mirrorless can do that a DSLR didn't do first and arguably better.

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