Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?

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doubledye
doubledye Forum Member • Posts: 61
Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
1

I have always struggled with this and never found a good answer. I shoot some products on a white background. I shoot with auto WB and tweak the raw image. However, I still almost always end up with blue halos around the edits of the objects and a blue tone in the shadows (and sometimes all of the white)

Is there a quick way to neutralize this?

I'm embarrassed to say how I go about it now, but it is time consuming and I know it can't be the proper way.

Thanks!

Here is an example. This is the edge (a piece of wood) up against the white. White balance is at 5900. Any warmer and the photo looks terrible.

Major Jack Reacher
Major Jack Reacher Senior Member • Posts: 1,224
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
3

doubledye wrote:

I have always struggled with this and never found a good answer. I shoot some products on a white background. I shoot with auto WB and tweak the raw image. However, I still almost always end up with blue halos around the edits of the objects and a blue tone in the shadows (and sometimes all of the white)

Is there a quick way to neutralize this?

I'm embarrassed to say how I go about it now, but it is time consuming and I know it can't be the proper way.

Thanks!

Here is an example. This is the edge (a piece of wood) up against the white. White balance is at 5900. Any warmer and the photo looks terrible.

Depends on software you are using.   Easy to adjust white balance with most software.  In photoshop, you can do it with Levels using the gray eyedropper tool.  If you are shooting in raw, you should be able to adjust the white balance setting in raw.

Now, as far as the blue halo.   In this case, it was very simple to not only remove it, but adjust the color without any steps.   I simply changed the mode of the image to Grayscale.   Problem solved.      Not so easy when you want to retain any other color in the image though.

Can you post the original image though.   I would like to try to figure out why that is happening in the first place.

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Zeee Forum Pro • Posts: 21,741
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
5

That kinda looks like fringing to me.

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Zeee Forum Pro • Posts: 21,741
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
5

Zeee wrote:

That kinda looks like fringing to me.

I just applied CA removal in LR. I tried defringe using the eye dropper and it didn't do anything.

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gordonpritchard Veteran Member • Posts: 4,547
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
1

Zeee wrote:

Zeee wrote:

That kinda looks like fringing to me.

I just applied CA removal in LR. I tried defringe using the eye dropper and it didn't do anything.

I think you're right. It's chromatic aberration and most RAW (if not all) converters in editing apps have simple tools to eliminate it either in a RAW or JPEG image.

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Sailor Blue
Sailor Blue Forum Pro • Posts: 15,527
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
3

I agree, it is chromatic aberration caused by your lens. Your post processing software should be able to get rid of it, or at least dramatically reduce it.

Auto WB is great if you are in an environment where the WB of the lighting is changing all the time. If your lighting is fixed then it is nothing but trouble.

Put a red subject up against a black background and take a shot with Auto WB. Auto WB will see all that red and not nearly as much blue or green and increase the WB color temperature, adding blue and green to the subject. Do it for a blue subject and the opposite happens with Auto WB, added red and some green.

In either of the above cases the subject colors will be wrong.  You can fix the color in post but it is easier to just get it right to begin with by using the correct fixed WB.

Get yourself a cheap WB card and use that to set a Custom WB in your camera. Doing this will eliminate a lot of hassle in post by giving your colors that are as close to those of the subject as possible for images from your camera.

B&H - Porta Brace White Balance Card WBC

Every camera sensor has color biases, every lens has a tint, and every software editor has color biases. If you want even more accurate colors then use a X-Rite color checker target to color calibrate your camera and lens combination. This will eliminate color biases from the camera sensor, the lens, and the editing software. Unfortunately you can only do this easily if you are using Adobe Camera Raw, Lightroom, or On1 software.

X-Rite ColorChecker Passport – X-Rite Photo – X-Rite Passport

If you are shooting against a white background don't use that to set the Custom WB. The background may not be really white and if you use it then the WB of your product will be incorrect.

For seamless white backgrounds find the subject exposure first.

Turn on the camera's Highlight Alert.

Start with the background lights at a low enough power that the background comes out gray in a test shot. Increase the power of the background lights in 1/3 stop increments until the background just starts to blink, indicating it is overexposed.

If the entire background isn't blinking your background lighting isn't even and you can try to adjust the lights to get the entire background blinking but that usually isn't critical. As long as there is a blinking halo around the subject it only takes a couple of seconds to paint the image edges and corners pure white in post.

Don't increase the power of the background lights any more. You want the background to just barely be overexposed. If you make the background too bright the light reflecting from it onto the subject's edges can cause those edges to be overexposed and "bleed" into the background. Too bright a background can also cause broad light source lens flare that shows up as a loss of contrast in the subject image.

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brick33308
brick33308 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,840
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?

in addition to your RAW processor getting rid of it, you could sample it on a HS adjustment layer, dial back saturation all the way down, mask out the adjustment and just paint it back on the blue line using very small brush the width of the line.

Zeee Forum Pro • Posts: 21,741
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?

So to expand this conversation it seems there are a few interpretations of this. Fringing and CA and I have found many say sites say it is the same thing. I have done some tests of tree leaves in the corner of a photo and I have use both CA and Defringing to clean it up. It was not easy but I found this on the net a few years ago.

  • Lateral chromatic aberration. This is the result of the lens focal length differing depending on the wavelength of incoming light. It is seen mainly in the corners and can be readily corrected, either by the camera (in JPEG mode) or by the RAW conversion software. Better lenses show less lateral CA but in the world of digital it's not the problem it once was.
  • Purple fringing. This is the result of axial colour in the infra-red spectrum being picked up as the blue and to some extent red dyes used in the sensor CFA both pass IR resulting in a purple glow around highlights.
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doubledye
OP doubledye Forum Member • Posts: 61
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?

Thanks so much for the input guys!

I use photoshop (not Lightroom) and the PS Raw editor. What setting in the RAW editor will remove this fringing/aberration? I have tried everything.

Thanks again! I will continue reading all of the great info above

ATP62 Contributing Member • Posts: 531
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?

In ACR , go to Lens Correction > Defringe

This values will remove it :

Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 15,537
Chromatic aberration or...
2

doubledye wrote:

I use photoshop (not Lightroom) and the PS Raw editor. What setting in the RAW editor will remove this fringing/aberration? I have tried everything.

Thanks again! I will continue reading all of the great info above

As already mentioned, go the Lens Correction setting in Adobe Camera Raw and select the "Remove Chromatic Aberration" checkbox. If you still see some, go to the "Manual" tab and adjust the Defringe settings. However, this may not completely work.

I would go around the image looking at all high contrast edges, and if you always see a color fringe of one color on the outside edge—away from the image center—and always see a different color on the inside edge towards the image center, and if you have no fringing at the image center, and fringing increases in size towards the corners, then that is classic transverse (or lateral) chromatic aberration, and that is what's corrected. This isn't fully corrected and it does leave the image slightly softer than if it didn't exist in the first place.

However, if you see fringes of one color before the point of focus, and fringes of another color after the point of focus, anywhere in the image, but with the fringes getting more prominent the more out-of-focus the area is, then that is axial or longitudinal chromatic aberration, and there is no really suitable fix for this. I'd suggest either stopping down more or getting a different lens that does not have this aberration.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatic_aberration

But there is a kind of fringing that is not related to optical aberrations, but rather is due to processing problems. In some older raw converters (and presumably some older cameras) mistakes in processing can cause fringing all around high contrast edges, such as tree twigs against the sky turning blue, despite chromatic aberration being removed. This can be due to the order of calculations during processing. I've seen this in software and cameras from the early 2000s, and I fixed problematic raw files simply by using newer and better raw processors.

We can expect errors in the finest level of details, which is called aliasing, which sometimes can be seen as colored fringes. Raw processors deal with this aliasing in different ways, but it can't be completely eliminated without drastic measures. The problem is due to the mechanism of color detection in cameras:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayer_filter

This aliasing is most seen when using the combination of very sharp optics and low megapixel cameras, and is less of a problem with high megapixel cameras and lousy optics. Low megapixel cameras typically use antialias filters, and cinematographers use diffusion filters to blur the image enough to eliminate aliasing altogether.

Color aliasing artifacts are reduced in Adobe Raw Converter in the Detail settings, under Noise Reduction: by default, some Color noise reduction is done partly to reduce this problem, and in effect the color information in an image is blurred.

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Zeee Forum Pro • Posts: 21,741
Re: Quick way to get rid of blue tones on white background/shadows?
1

Zeee wrote:

So to expand this conversation it seems there are a few interpretations of this. Fringing and CA and I have found many say sites say it is the same thing. I have done some tests of tree leaves in the corner of a photo and I have use both CA and Defringing to clean it up. It was not easy but I found this on the net a few years ago.

  • Lateral chromatic aberration. This is the result of the lens focal length differing depending on the wavelength of incoming light. It is seen mainly in the corners and can be readily corrected, either by the camera (in JPEG mode) or by the RAW conversion software. Better lenses show less lateral CA but in the world of digital it's not the problem it once was.
  • Purple fringing. This is the result of axial colour in the infra-red spectrum being picked up as the blue and to some extent red dyes used in the sensor CFA both pass IR resulting in a purple glow around highlights.

Here is an example.

Original

I checked the CA box in LR

Then I selected manual and used the Defringe eye dropper.

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