M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones

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Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
4

In the past, I’ve owned the Panasonic GX7, GX8 and GX85 and all have suffered from terrible skin tones. Blotchy red spots on faces, chests, even arms. This seems to happen both in natural light and really bad with flash or strobe lighting. I have really been wanting to get an Olympus EM 10 iii because of the great deals and I love a few of the Olympus portrait lenses. However, looking at samples of different Olympus cameras online, seems they suffer this same problem with blotchy red skin. It’s pretty bad, makes people look like they have some kind of skin disorder. I could never deliver photos like that to a client. Why is this? Is this a M43 thing? is there a way to correct this with different settings? Here are some examples of what I’m talking about from both Panasonic and Olympus cameras.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85
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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones

No one shoots portraits with their M43?

doady Senior Member • Posts: 1,742
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
6

I can't see any "blotchy red spots" in the examples you posted, at least not with this monitor (Dell 2209WA). Perhaps if you highlight them for us, we can try to help you.

I do remember some differences in the default reds from the RAWs in Capture One compared to the E-M1 mk2's JPEGs. To match the JPEGs, I made C1 render reds slightly more orange-y, more saturated, and lighter (hue +2.5, saturation +2.5, lightness +5). I can imagine only the increased saturation could cause blotchiness, while the shift to orange and the increased lightness would prevent red blotches.

The overall colour balance of Olympus JPEGs lean slightly toward cyan-blue, away from orange, compared to the Capture One defaults. Keep in mind, this is only a preliminary comparison, since I've only had the camera for a couple of weeks, but I find the Olympus colours to be quite natural, at least compared to Capture One. The JPEGs of E-M1 mk2 actually seem to de-emphasize red, not emphasize them.

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drj3 Veteran Member • Posts: 9,612
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
17

I think Olympus cameras come with Keep Warm Color turned on.  Easy to turn off or change color balance if you shoot RAW with Olympus WS or any good PP software.

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drj3

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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
2

doady wrote:

I can't see any "blotchy red spots" in the examples you posted, at least not with this monitor (Dell 2209WA). Perhaps if you highlight them for us, we can try to help you.

I do remember some differences in the default reds from the RAWs in Capture One compared to the E-M1 mk2's JPEGs. To match the JPEGs, I made C1 render reds slightly more orange-y, more saturated, and lighter (hue +2.5, saturation +2.5, lightness +5). I can imagine only the increased saturation could cause blotchiness, while the shift to orange and the increased lightness would prevent red blotches.

The overall colour balance of Olympus JPEGs lean slightly toward cyan-blue, away from orange, compared to the Capture One defaults. Keep in mind, this is only a preliminary comparison, since I've only had the camera for a couple of weeks, but I find the Olympus colours to be quite natural, at least compared to Capture One. The JPEGs of E-M1 mk2 actually seem to de-emphasize red, not emphasize them.

You can’t see the red spots on their faces or bodies that look like sunburns or skin disorders?

Photo 1- Pretty much the whole photo

Photo 2- smile lines and neck

Photo 3- all their faces, especially under eyes and noses. The dads fingers and the dark red spot on the wife’s shoulder by his hand and all down the backside of her arm looks burned.

Photo 4-above his eyebrows, under his eyes, tip of his nose and left side of his neck.

Photo 5- under eyes, cheek, lips and hand. Not as bad as the others.

Ruairi
Ruairi Regular Member • Posts: 438
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
14

I think your camera has just captured exactly what is in front of it. Namely, people with blotchy, sun-kissed skin, or in the case of the first image, someone under a magenta light/massive colour tint error - you may notice that when bright light shines through our skin, the shadow is distinctly blood coloured. If you shoot raw, all of the red mid-shadows can be cooled off easily in post.

Using the same gear as you. This is pretty much exactly what was in front of the camera - my freckly wife with an orange sunset behind the camera.

 Ruairi's gear list:Ruairi's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF8 Sony a7 II Olympus E-M1 II Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 +17 more
OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones

Ruairi wrote:

I think your camera has just captured exactly what is in front of it. Namely, people with blotchy, sun-kissed skin, or in the case of the first image, someone under a magenta light/massive colour tint error - you may notice that when bright light shines through our skin, the shadow is distinctly blood coloured. If you shoot raw, all of the red mid-shadows can be cooled off easily in post.

Using the same gear as you. This is pretty much exactly what was in front of the camera - my freckly wife.

Those aren’t my shots. No offense but that red is showing in your photo too. Her forehead, cheeks and neck all look sunburned and several shades different then under her eyes and her arms. This has to be a M43 Olympus/Panasonic thing, I’ve not seen this on any other cameras. I might just pick up that EM 10 III and shoot it back to back with my Canon and see how they handle the same skin tones.

Ruairi
Ruairi Regular Member • Posts: 438
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
10

Dexter75 wrote:

Ruairi wrote:

I think your camera has just captured exactly what is in front of it. Namely, people with blotchy, sun-kissed skin, or in the case of the first image, someone under a magenta light/massive colour tint error - you may notice that when bright light shines through our skin, the shadow is distinctly blood coloured. If you shoot raw, all of the red mid-shadows can be cooled off easily in post.

Using the same gear as you. This is pretty much exactly what was in front of the camera - my freckly wife.

Those aren’t my shots. No offense but that red is showing in your photo too. Her forehead, cheeks and neck all look sunburned and several shades different then under her eyes and her arms. This has to be a M43 Olympus/Panasonic thing, I’ve not seen this on any other cameras. I might just pick up that EM 10 III and shoot it back to back with my Canon and see how they handle the same skin tones.

'red is showing in your photo too'

That's exactly my point, there are sunset reds and oranges, and freckles in the shot, because they were in the scene - not a m43 thing, but a result of shooting a sun-kissed subject, during sunset. I don't see a problem with a camera and lens showing an accurate account of what was in front of it. On a side-note, sun burnt skin would be less orange, and more crimson, and peeling - she isn't sunburnt.

Those photos weren't yours? Can you share some of your Canon shots you are aspiring to reproduce.

On a much cooler, overcast winter day - far cooler shadows on the skin (ignore vignetting and high ISO, was experimenting with Sony TC)

 Ruairi's gear list:Ruairi's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF8 Sony a7 II Olympus E-M1 II Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 +17 more
OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones

Ruairi wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

Ruairi wrote:

I think your camera has just captured exactly what is in front of it. Namely, people with blotchy, sun-kissed skin, or in the case of the first image, someone under a magenta light/massive colour tint error - you may notice that when bright light shines through our skin, the shadow is distinctly blood coloured. If you shoot raw, all of the red mid-shadows can be cooled off easily in post.

Using the same gear as you. This is pretty much exactly what was in front of the camera - my freckly wife.

Those aren’t my shots. No offense but that red is showing in your photo too. Her forehead, cheeks and neck all look sunburned and several shades different then under her eyes and her arms. This has to be a M43 Olympus/Panasonic thing, I’ve not seen this on any other cameras. I might just pick up that EM 10 III and shoot it back to back with my Canon and see how they handle the same skin tones.

'red is showing in your photo too'

That's exactly my point, there are sunset reds and oranges, and freckles in the shot, because they were in the scene - not a m43 thing, but a result of shooting a sun-kissed subject, during sunset. I don't see a problem with a camera and lens showing an accurate account of what was in front of it. On a side-note, sun burnt skin would be less orange, and more crimson, and peeling - she isn't sunburnt.

Those photos weren't yours? Can you share some of your Canon shots you are aspiring to reproduce.

On a much cooler, overcast winter day - far cooler shadows on the skin (ignore vignetting and high ISO, was experimenting with Sony TC)

That looks good, but most every portrait photographer shoots on sunny days, especially around sunset (golden hour). I’ve made a career shooting sun-kissed models during sunset and never had red skin tone issues with Canon, Sony or Fuji. Not many of us are going out and shooting portraits in overcast weather much ha. So if I can’t use a camera in sunlight because it’s going to produce those pink/red skin tones, won’t do me much good. As I said, it does this really bad in studio with strobe lights too. Was hoping it was just Panasonic cameras but sadly, it appears to be Olympus cameras as well. I need to reach out to that Joel guy who shoots Olympus in studio and ask him how he gets normal skin tones.

Ruairi
Ruairi Regular Member • Posts: 438
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
6

Dexter75 wrote:

Ruairi wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

Ruairi wrote:

I think your camera has just captured exactly what is in front of it. Namely, people with blotchy, sun-kissed skin, or in the case of the first image, someone under a magenta light/massive colour tint error - you may notice that when bright light shines through our skin, the shadow is distinctly blood coloured. If you shoot raw, all of the red mid-shadows can be cooled off easily in post.

Using the same gear as you. This is pretty much exactly what was in front of the camera - my freckly wife.

Those aren’t my shots. No offense but that red is showing in your photo too. Her forehead, cheeks and neck all look sunburned and several shades different then under her eyes and her arms. This has to be a M43 Olympus/Panasonic thing, I’ve not seen this on any other cameras. I might just pick up that EM 10 III and shoot it back to back with my Canon and see how they handle the same skin tones.

'red is showing in your photo too'

That's exactly my point, there are sunset reds and oranges, and freckles in the shot, because they were in the scene - not a m43 thing, but a result of shooting a sun-kissed subject, during sunset. I don't see a problem with a camera and lens showing an accurate account of what was in front of it. On a side-note, sun burnt skin would be less orange, and more crimson, and peeling - she isn't sunburnt.

Those photos weren't yours? Can you share some of your Canon shots you are aspiring to reproduce.

On a much cooler, overcast winter day - far cooler shadows on the skin (ignore vignetting and high ISO, was experimenting with Sony TC)

That looks good, but most every portrait photographer shoots on sunny days, especially around sunset (golden hour). I’ve made a career shooting sun-kissed models during sunset and never had red skin tone issues with Canon, Sony or Fuji. Not many of us are going out and shooting portraits in overcast weather much ha. So if I can’t use a camera in sunlight because it’s going to produce those pink/red skin tones, won’t do me much good. As I said, it does this really bad in studio with strobe lights too. Was hoping it was just Panasonic cameras but sadly, it appears to be Olympus cameras as well. I need to reach out to that Joel guy who shoots Olympus in studio and ask him how he gets normal skin tones.

Ah, something isn't right about this...

Golden hour does not occur during sunset - there is a significant difference: 'In photography, the golden hour is the period of daytime shortly after sunrise or before sunset, during which daylight is redder and softer than when the Sun is higher in the sky.'.

Those skin tones I showed at sunset, and the examples you gave, were definitely orange/red - not 'pink/red'. What monitor model are you using? Mine is a calibrated Dell 2516D, a well regarded unit.

Many photographers prefer Canon colours over anything else, so you wouldn't be alone to go with Canon. I note a more green tint to Canon skintones, also commonly recognised.

One final try...

Example in controlled studio lighting, 5600k

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Fairlane Regular Member • Posts: 121
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
9

Sorry, I don't get it.

Could be (all of my) screens, but I highly doubt it. I cannot see any major differences in skintones/issues between Pana/Oly M43 and other brands/formats.

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Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Panasonic GX850 Panasonic Leica DG Macro-Elmarit 45mm F2.8 ASPH OIS Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH Panasonic 100-300mm F4-5.6 II +3 more
OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
1

Ruairi wrote:

Ah, something isn't right about this...

Golden hour does not occur during sunset - there is a significant difference: 'In photography, the golden hour is the period of daytime shortly after sunrise or before sunset, during which daylight is redder and softer than when the Sun is higher in the sky.'.

Those skin tones I showed at sunset, and the examples you gave, were definitely orange/red - not 'pink/red'. What monitor model are you using? Mine is a calibrated Dell 2516D, a well regarded unit.

Many photographers prefer Canon colours over anything else, so you wouldn't be alone to go with Canon. I note a more green tint to Canon skintones, also commonly recognised.

One final try...

Example in controlled studio lighting, 5600k

I like this example here, very nice. Yea, I know golden hour isnt technically sunset but Ive always known it to be the last hour the sun is up. Yes, orange/red is probably more accurate. Im on a 27 inch iMac, non 5k. Photos look the same on my iPad Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max too, so not my monitor. We all have different preferences when it comes to skin tones and you are right, many do prefer Canon skin tones, which is why so many portrait shooters use Canon. There is no right or wrong really, just personal preferences. Like I said, Im tempted to grab an Olympus and shoot it side by side with my Canon now. Id really like to use a few of those fantastic Olympus portrait lenses again,

BDavis Regular Member • Posts: 474
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
21

This is not a color balance issue, not is it a camera model issue.

It is a camera set up issue and easily fixed in post processing.

I ran all your photos through Photoshop and found reducing the overall color by 20 to 30 points fixed all the issues. The only one that was -20 was the cooler picture of the solo man. The rest were -30. The picture of the blonde woman in blue shirt is also overexposed. Brought down exposure a bit and was fine (and with -30 desaturation)

I shoot in studio with Novatron heads. Very consistent light for me for color. Been using same heads for 35 years, some with new tubes.

I tried some cheap chinese AC powered units. Too cheap, they are OK, just not robust . And they did have a red bias, easily corrected IN CAMERA by adjusting the red green bias in the SCP. Of course this only affects the JPEGS, and as I also shoot RAW alongside it is no problem either way. The RAWs get massaged in post anyway.

I have shot in muted with saturation set to 0 or even -1  since first picking up the E-10 in 2001, and have found it the same with all the Olympus cameras.  When processing photos from other folk's cameras, I have found the same -20 to -30 desaturation to be the fix for a LOT of issues related to color and facial blemishes. The default for most of these is too high saturation to make color pop, and make the picture or the camera look "good".

My default for contrast has also been -2 contrast. All the way down.  Again these settings only affect JPEGS, but in RAW I set these the same way for saturation and Contrast.   In DXO it is -40 contrast.

Another issue not related to any of these pictures. When people drink they flush red. A problem with club shots and wedding receptions.  That is fixed by desaturating just the red channel in Photoshop. Again, an easy fix, not camera specific.

A reminder from the past lest we forget:

The amateur films back in the day were highly saturated and high contrast. Made them full of color.

I could never get good results from these. Look at the prints critically and you will see the same issues as you are mentioning on your pictures.

Both the professional papers AND the professional films were lower in contrast and lower in saturation. Very easy to work with and got great results.

Back to the present: Red ears are caused by backlighting through the skin as another poster mentioned. Fix it with desaturation tool on just the ears. Very light touch until matched. Red shadows fixed in a variety of ways, but in general just lower the overall saturation and these issues melt away.

A thing about JPEGS, just like with overexposure, once you blow out a color channel, you are skewered.  Keeping the saturation and contrast down prevents this and you can ALWAYS bring the color back up later in processing. Not possible once you overexpose a color channel. Raw allows you to correct up to a point. Under exposure, bracketing, testing helps prevent these issues, in studio and outdoors.

Hope this helps.

sean000 Veteran Member • Posts: 7,684
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
9

Dexter75 wrote:

Ruairi wrote:

I think your camera has just captured exactly what is in front of it. Namely, people with blotchy, sun-kissed skin, or in the case of the first image, someone under a magenta light/massive colour tint error - you may notice that when bright light shines through our skin, the shadow is distinctly blood coloured. If you shoot raw, all of the red mid-shadows can be cooled off easily in post.

Using the same gear as you. This is pretty much exactly what was in front of the camera - my freckly wife.

Those aren’t my shots. No offense but that red is showing in your photo too. Her forehead, cheeks and neck all look sunburned and several shades different then under her eyes and her arms. This has to be a M43 Olympus/Panasonic thing, I’ve not seen this on any other cameras. I might just pick up that EM 10 III and shoot it back to back with my Canon and see how they handle the same skin tones.

I used to shoot Nikon before Panasonic and Olympus, and I learned to deal with red blotchy skin many years ago in Photoshop and later in Lightroom... so it isn’t just m4/3. The truth is that many pale complected people have red blotchy skin that gets more intense when they are hot, cold, angry, or blushing. The camera is simply capturing accurate colors (assuming white balance is correct), but some picture mode/color profiles may emphasize the issue while others may tone it down (Switching to portrait picture mode for JPEG and RAW+JPEG). For portraits taken with either my Nikon cameras or m4/3 I sometimes apply a Lightroom preset that has some adjustments to shift red hues slightly towards orange while also desaturating them slightly... or I will use a targeted adjustment brush with a similar HSL adjustment.

It’s a matter of taste, but I don’t find many issues with the initial examples you posted (or the one above), other than the white balance being way off (too magenta) in the first example you posted. I think Ruairi’s example of his lovely wife looks great.  She has similar skin to my wife and daughter. Of course sometimes their skin gets even more red and I tone it down for them in post. Not because the camera captured something that wasn’t there, but because my wife prefers it when I tone down red cheeks, noses, and ears. I don’t get rid of it completely, because then it no longer looks like them.

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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
1

BDavis wrote:

This is not a color balance issue, not is it a camera model issue.

It is a camera set up issue and easily fixed in post processing.

I ran all your photos through Photoshop and found reducing the overall color by 20 to 30 points fixed all the issues. The only one that was -20 was the cooler picture of the solo man. The rest were -30. The picture of the blonde woman in blue shirt is also overexposed. Brought down exposure a bit and was fine (and with -30 desaturation)

I shoot in studio with Novatron heads. Very consistent light for me for color. Been using same heads for 35 years, some with new tubes.

I tried some cheap chinese AC powered units. Too cheap, they are OK, just not robust . And they did have a red bias, easily corrected IN CAMERA by adjusting the red green bias in the SCP. Of course this only affects the JPEGS, and as I also shoot RAW alongside it is no problem either way. The RAWs get massaged in post anyway.

I have shot in muted with saturation set to 0 or even -1 since first picking up the E-10 in 2001, and have found it the same with all the Olympus cameras. When processing photos from other folk's cameras, I have found the same -20 to -30 desaturation to be the fix for a LOT of issues related to color and facial blemishes. The default for most of these is too high saturation to make color pop, and make the picture or the camera look "good".

My default for contrast has also been -2 contrast. All the way down. Again these settings only affect JPEGS, but in RAW I set these the same way for saturation and Contrast. In DXO it is -40 contrast.

Another issue not related to any of these pictures. When people drink they flush red. A problem with club shots and wedding receptions. That is fixed by desaturating just the red channel in Photoshop. Again, an easy fix, not camera specific.

A reminder from the past lest we forget:

The amateur films back in the day were highly saturated and high contrast. Made them full of color.

I could never get good results from these. Look at the prints critically and you will see the same issues as you are mentioning on your pictures.

Both the professional papers AND the professional films were lower in contrast and lower in saturation. Very easy to work with and got great results.

Back to the present: Red ears are caused by backlighting through the skin as another poster mentioned. Fix it with desaturation tool on just the ears. Very light touch until matched. Red shadows fixed in a variety of ways, but in general just lower the overall saturation and these issues melt away.

A thing about JPEGS, just like with overexposure, once you blow out a color channel, you are skewered. Keeping the saturation and contrast down prevents this and you can ALWAYS bring the color back up later in processing. Not possible once you overexpose a color channel. Raw allows you to correct up to a point. Under exposure, bracketing, testing helps prevent these issues, in studio and outdoors.

Hope this helps.

Thanks, but as I mentioned earlier, those are not my photos, they are just randoms I found online searching Olympus and Panasonic portraits. There are dozens more. So all of these different photographers have their settings wrong? I find that hard to believe and as I said, I dont see this issue with other cameras aside from Panasonic and Olympus M43 cameras. Thanks for the great info though.

Ruairi
Ruairi Regular Member • Posts: 438
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
1

Dexter75 wrote:

Ruairi wrote:

Ah, something isn't right about this...

Golden hour does not occur during sunset - there is a significant difference: 'In photography, the golden hour is the period of daytime shortly after sunrise or before sunset, during which daylight is redder and softer than when the Sun is higher in the sky.'.

Those skin tones I showed at sunset, and the examples you gave, were definitely orange/red - not 'pink/red'. What monitor model are you using? Mine is a calibrated Dell 2516D, a well regarded unit.

Many photographers prefer Canon colours over anything else, so you wouldn't be alone to go with Canon. I note a more green tint to Canon skintones, also commonly recognised.

One final try...

Example in controlled studio lighting, 5600k

I like this example here, very nice. Yea, I know golden hour isnt technically sunset but Ive always known it to be the last hour the sun is up. Yes, orange/red is probably more accurate. Im on a 27 inch iMac, non 5k. Photos look the same on my iPad Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max too, so not my monitor. We all have different preferences when it comes to skin tones and you are right, many do prefer Canon skin tones, which is why so many portrait shooters use Canon. There is no right or wrong really, just personal preferences. Like I said, Im tempted to grab an Olympus and shoot it side by side with my Canon now. Id really like to use a few of those fantastic Olympus portrait lenses again,

Definitely have a go with an E-M10iii. Olympus Natural colour profile is as good as I've ever got to what I see outside the camera. Must admit whenever I photograph European Robins, I fiddle the oranges slightly more crimson (didn't touch the colours on the above though).
I use new mac stuff too, but set all apps to sRGB 2.1 and calibrate with a puck where possible. They come from the factory with a bit more pop than normal. Best thing is to test across devices ofc, as you already do.

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JaKing
JaKing Senior Member • Posts: 6,130
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
19

Dexter75 wrote:

Thanks, but as I mentioned earlier, those are not my photos, they are just randoms I found online searching Olympus and Panasonic portraits. There are dozens more. So all of these different photographers have their settings wrong? I find that hard to believe and as I said, I dont see this issue with other cameras aside from Panasonic and Olympus M43 cameras. Thanks

With all due respect, presenting random images from other photographers where you can only guess at lighting and camera settings (at best ... ) is hardly meaningful.

Personally, I have never been overly impressed with Canon and Nikon colour science, but lots of people like either pastel or 'Kodachrome' colours. Same in the film era for all of the 50 years I used film cameras.

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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,572
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
2

JaKing wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

Thanks, but as I mentioned earlier, those are not my photos, they are just randoms I found online searching Olympus and Panasonic portraits. There are dozens more. So all of these different photographers have their settings wrong? I find that hard to believe and as I said, I dont see this issue with other cameras aside from Panasonic and Olympus M43 cameras. Thanks

With all due respect, presenting random images from other photographers where you can only guess at lighting and camera settings (at best ... ) is hardly meaningful.

This is a good point. I always do it though. Whenever I am interested in a camera or a lens, I search for photos and videos of that gear being used for portraits. I should just rent it and test it myself.

LightCameraAction Regular Member • Posts: 222
Re: M43 cameras and blotchy red skin tones
3

I have had issues with skin tones that were too red from my Olympus camera when I used the camera natural profile on old versions of Adobe Lightroom (before Adobe created its own set of profiles). The camera natural profile was supposed to match the out of camera JPEG, so I imagine the out of camera JPEG may have also had skin tones that were too red (but I never verified this). Note that the skin tones were way too red... people looked like tomatoes. Note that warm colors were turned off in camera.

Using the Adobe profiles in Lightroom fixed the issue (I loved it when the Adobe color profile was developed), leading me to believe it was an either an issue with Adobe's interpretation of Olympus colors or Olympus colors.

Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 17,164
Jpegs? Raw?
8

Shooting jpegs or raw? Are you saying that shooting jpegs you are having these skin rendition problems?

If you are shooting Panasonic jpegs then which Recording Mode are you using? You should be using Portrait or possibly Natural. Not Standard, Vivid, or Scenery.

Note that with Olympus you should use Portrait or Muted.

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