Color banding low light sunset photos

Started Dec 23, 2019 | Discussions
Stevemank
OP Stevemank Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos

Yes in fine. I have RAF files. These are SOOC in fine except for the bird house which I adjusted. I don't have the original of that one anymore because I was unhappy with the sky situation.

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Stevemank

Stevemank
OP Stevemank Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos

S-rbg, but I now changed it (haven't gotten that far in the manual yet). Thanks! Why would anyone want s-rbg?

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Stevemank

Phil BH Contributing Member • Posts: 982
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
1

Stevemank wrote:

Thank you everyone for your input in this matter. I hope I'm not being an idiot here but it's quite possible. I'm new to such a powerful camera. Here are a couple more pictures that may more clearly define what I'm talking about. I've read about the purple fringing issue with Fuji sensors. There's a couple photos looking into the sunset and others looking away. I've read it's more of an issue with backlit subjects and maybe it does come into play here, but haven't come across anyone else experiencing this particular issue. In these photos you will see semi-circular arcs radiating across the sky in wave like "bands" in purple/pink coloring interspersed with a blue/green coloring in between. I thought at first that maybe it was a lens issue with the 12 mm samyang that has the heavy vignetting (wide open, yeah I'm learning), but it happens with all the lenses and particularly when there is lots of pink and purple in the sky, and worse when looking into the sunset. The one with the bird house is a re-download from my Facebook looking to the NE. It seems the lower resolution required there has exacerbated the situation making it easier to see. These waves of all alternating color are clearly not visible to my naked eye and I don't see them in anyone else's photos. Emirco has also highlighted what I'm seeing in the adjustment he posted. I AM taking these photos from a single location east of Austin tx. My eye just isn't seeing this in the sky.

What you are seeing is a normal, natural phenomenon. The banding of color in the sky during dusk or dawn is normal, and is ultimately caused by Rayleigh scattering, the same thing that makes the sky look blue during the day, or red during the night. What causes the pink is what is called the Belt of Venus, and a good explanation can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belt_of_Venus

Here is an expert out of an explanations of Rayleigh scattering, from timeanddate.com, and how it affects the colors we see at sunset or sunrise: "

During sunsets and sunrises, when the Sun is closer to the horizon, sunlight has to travel through a longer distance and more of the dense environment to reach an observer’s eye.

Sunrise and sunset times in your city

Due to Rayleigh scattering, most of the light of shorter wavelengths – the blue, violet, and green – are scattered away multiple times, leaving only lights of longer wavelength – the red, orange, and yellow – to pass straight through to the observer.

The blue hour

The golden hour

This is why a rising and setting Sun tends to take on spectacular hues of red, orange, and yellow."

Here is an example of the color banding. I took this from a plane.

SVJIM Senior Member • Posts: 1,757
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
4

It is incorrect that there are only 256 colors in the SRGB color space, there are millions of colors. The AdobeRGB color space has a bit larger spread of colors. There was a time not too long ago that most displays would not display AdobeRGB correctly, this was some what pronounced with web browsers. SRGB is the standard today for most monitors, TVs, etc. You can get monitors that have extended color spaces, but they cost more. Also, for printing not all print services expect the photos to be delivered in SRGB.  When you shoot in RAW, you can choose what color space to use when you process your files. The color space of the camera is greater than either the SRGB or AdobeRGB color spaces. In general, if you are a beginner selecting the SRGB color space is going to be the simplest and most consistent for you to use.

Jim

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onlyfreeman
onlyfreeman Senior Member • Posts: 2,498
Any raw available?
3

Stevemank wrote:

Yes in fine. I have RAF files. These are SOOC in fine except for the bird house which I adjusted. I don't have the original of that one anymore because I was unhappy with the sky situation.

I think the issue is JPEG compression & processing.

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crosson
crosson Regular Member • Posts: 426
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
3

We are confusing natural "banding", colors and light gradients, to actual color banding that I think OP is referring to but might not necessarily be suffering from based off his images. Typically when folk complain of color banding in their images they are referring to artifacts in their resulting image. Otherwise every sunset pic ever taken would be horrible.

Banding is the result of a harsh color or light gradient being exhibited as a hard line in the resulting photograph. It can happen with an XT series camera especially when using fuji's film simulations. It is very common in sunsets if one is not careful.

The good news is that banding, the type I am referring to, is readily rectified by moving to a linear tone curve and making careful use of the curve tool.

This is extra easy in the C1. Under base characteristics move the curve away from a fuji film simulation and to one of several linear options.

Below is a good example of what color banding will look like. I used fuji's velvia to exaggerate issue.

Obvious color banding around the sun

Banding corrected by using a linear tone curve

For this one I used the simply film high contrast curve provided by C1.

Others have pointed out, correctly, noise issues. This can be fixed by selectively sharpening in C1 pro. Simply apply a mask to the components you want to sharpen, leave the sky or wherever you see banding, unsharpened. Optionally you can create another layer using the inversed mask and add additional noise reduction and negative clarity on the clarity slider to the sky to further soften areas prone to banding.

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Stevemank
OP Stevemank Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
1

Thank you all for your helpful guiding comments. It appears that I am being an idiot and creating an issue where there isn't one. My apologies! This has been a very helpful educational thread for me with good directions for further study and appreciated. I need to understand better the capabilities of the digital beast and this thread points me further down the road. I went out to witness and photograph the sunset tonight keeping careful attention to the changing colors in the sky. After some intentful gazing I was barely able to distinguish some color bands in the sky with hints of greenish light in between. So difficult it was too see that I asked myself if I wasn't actually just hallucinating them. Chalk it up to being 60 with eyes that took a dump at 40 and I'm seeing the world even less as it is than before. Good thing I have a camera that sees better than I do to help in that matter, besides being a load of fun. I love this photography trip, It's helping me to be more aware and appreciative of the beauty that surrounds me. Again, thank you everyone.

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Stevemank

GodSpeaks
GodSpeaks Forum Pro • Posts: 14,628
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
2

Stevemank wrote:

Thanks Doug,

I'm only partially understanding this. I see a drop in the graph at about 600 ISO then rising up at about 800. If you have more links about this subject I'll gladly read them. So 1600 works as good or better in some situations then a lower ISO as far as noise is concerned with this sensor? Should I be leaving the DR off in this type of photo?

If you are not already, you should be shooting this kind of shot as RAW.  RAW will give you maximum flexibility for post processing.

Like others have said, I am not seeing any banding, just some noise in the darker areas of the blue.

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Phil BH Contributing Member • Posts: 982
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos

Stevemank wrote:

Thank you all for your helpful guiding comments. It appears that I am being an idiot and creating an issue where there isn't one. My apologies! This has been a very helpful educational thread for me with good directions for further study and appreciated. I need to understand better the capabilities of the digital beast and this thread points me further down the road. I went out to witness and photograph the sunset tonight keeping careful attention to the changing colors in the sky. After some intentful gazing I was barely able to distinguish some color bands in the sky with hints of greenish light in between. So difficult it was too see that I asked myself if I wasn't actually just hallucinating them. Chalk it up to being 60 with eyes that took a dump at 40 and I'm seeing the world even less as it is than before. Good thing I have a camera that sees better than I do to help in that matter, besides being a load of fun. I love this photography trip, It's helping me to be more aware and appreciative of the beauty that surrounds me. Again, thank you everyone.

No apologies necessary. Enjoy the camera, and nice images. I really like them.

Phil

CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,025
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
1

Stevemank wrote:

Thank you all for your helpful guiding comments. It appears that I am being an idiot and creating an issue where there isn't one. My apologies! This has been a very helpful educational thread for me with good directions for further study and appreciated. I need to understand better the capabilities of the digital beast and this thread points me further down the road. I went out to witness and photograph the sunset tonight keeping careful attention to the changing colors in the sky. After some intentful gazing I was barely able to distinguish some color bands in the sky with hints of greenish light in between. So difficult it was too see that I asked myself if I wasn't actually just hallucinating them. Chalk it up to being 60 with eyes that took a dump at 40 and I'm seeing the world even less as it is than before. Good thing I have a camera that sees better than I do to help in that matter, besides being a load of fun. I love this photography trip, It's helping me to be more aware and appreciative of the beauty that surrounds me. Again, thank you everyone.

I liked the image, and somewhat agreed with Doug Pardee and others that it's fine. But I had a few minutes and wanted to try an edit with feathering to add red at the sides. I'm not sure if you'll prefer this to your original, or not.

If I were you, I would try Velvia emulation mode. Also your lens seems to have vignetting (corner darkening) that some Raw processors would be able to correct.

Stevemank
OP Stevemank Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos

Thank you sir. I am shooting raw along with jpg and don't even bother using the jpg for anything other than with media sharing. So what I get from the graph is that once ISO reaches 300 with the xt2 one should skip straight to ISO 800 for lowest noise levels, at least in low light situations. Correct?

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Stevemank

Stevemank
OP Stevemank Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos

Cool. I think what you did with the feathering improved the photo.

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Stevemank

CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 18,025
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos

Stevemank wrote:

Cool. I think what you did with the feathering improved the photo.

Thank you. I also tried editing your lone-tree image, but went overboard with lighting effects. So instead, here is the image with reduced vignetting (via Darktable).

What lens did you use for this image? EXIF says just 50mm without further information.

Stevemank
OP Stevemank Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Color banding low light sunset photos
2

Cool! That was taken with a manual rokinon 12mm set wide open to f2. Maybe the vingnetting will decrease some with the lens stopped down some...? I've just started using C1 "express" as I read that it's good for Fuji RAF but haven't learned most of what it can do yet.

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Stevemank

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