Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

Started 3 months ago | Questions
kierenlon
kierenlon Contributing Member • Posts: 770
Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

I was going to ask this in the Landscape forum and might have to if this thread fails but I thought fuji specific might be more useful.

I've never really been into landscape photography - mostly doing event and sports with my NIkon. I've just switched to a :

  • Fuji X-T30 - not weather sealed(+2 batteries)
  • 15-45mm kit lens
  • 35mm F1.4
  • 100mm F2.8 adapted Nikon Series E(which is pretty small and light).
  • Gorillapod tripod
  • Godox Flash & trigger

I have also recently enjoyed scenic walks and want to do more of them - starting easy. These are typically day hikes on well worn paths. Often in the range of 5 - 10 miles

My limited experience extends to:

UK - Box Hill
https://www.komoot.com/tour/31679609
(not my tour or pics)

Cyprus
https://www.komoot.com/tour/7383201

and I plan to do more, so any tips welcome and I mean any. I have decent foot wear but am yet to buy suitable outdoor clothes for changeable weather. I think I may need a freezer bag and hairband for the rain?

Next on the plan are some of the trails in Hong Kong in December
eg:  https://thehoneycombers.com/hong-kong/hiking-in-hong-kong-nature-scenery-fitness/

and in about 4 months, the Scottish Munros (which is where kit will be more important
https://www.visitscotland.com/see-do/active/walking/munro-bagging/

I will be hiking with non-photographers so can stop for some views or rests but it is not fair to make a habit of it. So for that reason, I expect I need to be able to get a shot quickly and also wont be able to get up super early to make sure the sun is in the optimum place.

Do you have any tips for shot planning ahead of the hike?
Tips or youtube / books / inspiration for landscape in general

Tips for the selfie / landscape? If I have hiked up to an amazing view, I would quite like to get a shot of me and group in frame.

Tips on carrying gear - I don't plan to carry much photography gear but as weight / bulk will also come from water, a snack / lunch / clothing layers, like a down jacket

Apps - I use Komoot which is good for route planing but not great for discovering trails.

What do you carry? What camera settings / focal lengths do you use? Can you post pics or links in here?  Self portrait / group portraits with landscapes?

I am still recovering from spending on the new kit but could possibly buy a compact travel tripod.

 kierenlon's gear list:kierenlon's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon D7000 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Nikon AF-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED +4 more
ANSWER:
Morris0
Morris0 Forum Pro • Posts: 12,329
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
1

kierenlon wrote:

I was going to ask this in the Landscape forum and might have to if this thread fails but I thought fuji specific might be more useful.

I've never really been into landscape photography - mostly doing event and sports with my NIkon. I've just switched to a :

  • Fuji X-T30 - not weather sealed(+2 batteries)
  • 15-45mm kit lens
  • 35mm F1.4
  • 100mm F2.8 adapted Nikon Series E(which is pretty small and light).
  • Gorillapod tripod
  • Godox Flash & trigger

I have also recently enjoyed scenic walks and want to do more of them - starting easy. These are typically day hikes on well worn paths. Often in the range of 5 - 10 miles

My limited experience extends to:

UK - Box Hill
https://www.komoot.com/tour/31679609
(not my tour or pics)

Cyprus
https://www.komoot.com/tour/7383201

and I plan to do more, so any tips welcome and I mean any. I have decent foot wear but am yet to buy suitable outdoor clothes for changeable weather. I think I may need a freezer bag and hairband for the rain?

Next on the plan are some of the trails in Hong Kong in December
eg: https://thehoneycombers.com/hong-kong/hiking-in-hong-kong-nature-scenery-fitness/

and in about 4 months, the Scottish Munros (which is where kit will be more important
https://www.visitscotland.com/see-do/active/walking/munro-bagging/

I will be hiking with non-photographers so can stop for some views or rests but it is not fair to make a habit of it. So for that reason, I expect I need to be able to get a shot quickly and also wont be able to get up super early to make sure the sun is in the optimum place.

Do you have any tips for shot planning ahead of the hike?

Google the trail and look at photos people have taken and descriptions of the hike.  Be creative so your photos don't look like everyone else's.  There is no problem imitating the greats when they have taken photos from this location.  You will find out why they are great is it can be hard to replicate their work.

Tips or youtube / books / inspiration for landscape in general

When you do your google search, look for guides as well

Tips for the selfie / landscape? If I have hiked up to an amazing view, I would quite like to get a shot of me and group in frame.

Ask someone to take your photo or use a tripod.  Take advantage of the timer on your camera to trip the shutter or use a remote or remote app to trip the shutter.

Tips on carrying gear - I don't plan to carry much photography gear but as weight / bulk will also come from water, a snack / lunch / clothing layers, like a down jacket

Take as little camera gear as possible.  Carry your camera around your neck with the lens cap off so you can take photos easily.  I like to use a versatile zoom such as Fuji's 18-135mm for this.  You may want to place an ultra wide in your day pack.  Also some extra batteries and possibly some filters.  If you like to photograph wildlife as well, carry your long lens on a second body and have this setup accessible.  A harness that can carry two bodies can make you comfortable doing this.

Apps - I use Komoot which is good for route planing but not great for discovering trails.

See if there is an app with trail maps for your area.  In the US all trails is great as the maps support GPS.  Consider how you will navigate should your phone lose power or fail.

What do you carry? What camera settings / focal lengths do you use? Can you post pics or links in here? Self portrait / group portraits with landscapes?

I am still recovering from spending on the new kit but could possibly buy a compact travel tripod.

Avoid cheap tripods!  You are better off shooting hand held than using a cheap tripod.  Hold off till you can afford a decent carbon fiber or aluminum tripod.  Avoid aluminum if you will hike in the cold as touching cold aluminum will remove skin from your hands.  Also get a decent quality head.

Have fun,

Morris

 Morris0's gear list:Morris0's gear list
Fujifilm X-T3 Samyang 10mm F2.8 Fujifilm XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR XF 90mm Fujifilm XF 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 OIS WR +14 more
Porquinho Contributing Member • Posts: 626
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
1

Also a hiking/walking enthusiast here. I use my X-T20 and bring the 35/1.4 and 16/1.4. Sometimes also the 80/2.8. Though I need to order an ND filter for the 16 for my next walking holiday.

Add Austria to your hiking list. Stunning, heart-stoppingly stunning. I'm returning next summer for another hiking holiday. Picos de Europa (Spain again) is next after Austria.

This year I've done Sierra de Aracena (Spain) and dune walking on Spiekeroog island in the Wadden Sea.

Everything has to fit into the PD 5L bag, sometimes I leave the 80mm at home. Don't forget cleaning kit.

 Porquinho's gear list:Porquinho's gear list
Fujifilm X-S1 Fujifilm X100S Fujifilm X20 Fujifilm X-T20 Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R +5 more
SkatePunk
SkatePunk New Member • Posts: 10
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
6

One of the things I've found most helpful is moving away from draping the camera strap around my neck and instead slinging it over my left shoulder and across my torso. For my X-T3 with 18-55mm F2.8-4.0 lens, the Peak Design Leash works great in this configuration.

This sling setup allows me to position the camera in the small of my back when the hiking gets technical or at my hip for quick access. My camera always feels secure and doesn't sway from side to side like it does when draped around my neck.

To also help with the quick access, I start my hike with camera settings that I know well and generally suit moderately moving subjects at medium-to-short distances in shadows or partial sunlight. I find that these are the shots I miss if I'm changing camera settings.

For landscape shots, I have more time to adjust the camera. I try to remember to reset my "on the run" settings before returning to the hike.

Lastly, if the trip's emphasis is on the hike and not the photography, I will typically leave the tripod. I've found that nature often has suitable substitutes if you think creatively about achieving height, angle, and, sometimes, downward force.

jjz2 Senior Member • Posts: 1,661
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

For what you’re asking just the 15-45 would do the job. Even in pre sunrise shots it’s fine Bc of the wide angle and ois.

I would start off keeping it simple then go from there when you have a need for it.

For gloves I use warm wool gloves with the fingers cut off...easier to control camera like this while keeping hands warm.

 jjz2's gear list:jjz2's gear list
Fujifilm X-T10 Fujifilm X-T20 Fujifilm XF 27mm F2.8 Fujifilm XF 35mm F2 R WR Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8
Bill Ferris
Bill Ferris Veteran Member • Posts: 4,990
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
2

You mentioned footwear, which is where a successful, fun hiking experience begins. If you're getting blisters or losing toenails, change the footwear until you find a product that feels good on the feet and keeps them, healthy.

Your day pack also should feel comfortable. The weight of the content carried by your hips. There should be space between your pack and your back to keep the body cool. It should have pockets and compartments allowing you to both keep your gear organized and accessible.

Weight is a big issue. One way to manage weight, is to adopt a strategy of requiring your gear to have more than one use. For example, trekking poles can be great for negotiating rugged terrain. They can also be support for an emergency shelter...more than one use.

When dayhiking, you should always have the essentials needed for safety:

  • First aid
  • Water
  • Food
  • Navigation (map, compass or GPS)
  • Cutting tool
  • A means of starting a fire
  • Light for possible darkness
  • A means of communicating with or signaling the outside world
  • Shelter & clothing for inclement weather

These may be items you end up using, or needed by a member of your group or by someone you encounter on the trail.

As for photography, I'm a big fan of the Peak Design Capture system of securely carrying a camera. The camera is mounted to a device on your shoulder strap or belt. It keeps both hands free and your camera immediately at the ready for photo ops.

A ziploc bag can be a lightweight means of protecting your gear from rain or other inclement weather. Power - or the lack of it - is a big issue with mirrorless, especially Fuji. Pack spare batteries or - on longer hikes - a fully-charged power bank that can be used to recharge camera batteries in the field.

I know a lot of folks who like to pack multiple lenses and accessories while hiking. Personally, I like to simplify things...one camera, one lens, my smartphone as backup (and potential communications device in an emergency) and minimal kit to clean the camera body & lens. If I anticipate wanting to make a long exposure to give water or clouds that silky appearance, I'll pack a neutral density filter to enable use of a 1-second exposure in daylight.

As others have suggested, Google your destination to get a sense of what photo ops will be available. I'm a big believer in knowing how to get from point A to point B, even on a guided hike. Research the route/trail ahead of time so, if the guide becomes sick, injured or lost, you'll have a fighting chance to self-rescue.

Finally, remember that in an emergency situation, you don't need to make the one best decision. Two things will get you home, safely: make good decisions & avoid mistakes. It's the mistakes, especially being too aggressive in the constant pursuit of regaining the trail, that gets people injured or killed. Often, stopping a few minutes, having some water and a snack, and rationally assessing the situation will lead to good decisions and rescue.

The reason I focus so much on the potential negatives, is that the better prepared a person is in how to respond to adversity, the more freedom you have to enjoy the experience of being out in nature. That freedom comes from having a plan and approach in place for how you'll respond to the unexpected. With that matter settled, go out and have fun.

Enjoy your treks and make some great photos

-- hide signature --

Bill Ferris Photography
Flagstaff, AZ
http://www.billferris.photoshelter.com

 Bill Ferris's gear list:Bill Ferris's gear list
Nikon D610 Fujifilm X-T20 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm F4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Tamron SP 24-70mm F2.8 Di VC USD +3 more
jhorse Veteran Member • Posts: 3,572
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

kierenlon wrote:

I was going to ask this in the Landscape forum and might have to if this thread fails but I thought fuji specific might be more useful.

I've never really been into landscape photography - mostly doing event and sports with my NIkon. I've just switched to a :

  • Fuji X-T30 - not weather sealed(+2 batteries)
  • 15-45mm kit lens
  • 35mm F1.4
  • 100mm F2.8 adapted Nikon Series E(which is pretty small and light).
  • Gorillapod tripod
  • Godox Flash & trigger

This is a great hiking and landscaping kit. From my experience, I doubt the flash would get much use hiking.

I have also recently enjoyed scenic walks and want to do more of them - starting easy. These are typically day hikes on well worn paths. Often in the range of 5 - 10 miles

I do the same in the South of England, main South Downs.

My limited experience extends to:

UK - Box Hill
https://www.komoot.com/tour/31679609
(not my tour or pics)

Wonderful hiking and great images

Cyprus
https://www.komoot.com/tour/7383201

Brings back fond memories when I spent 6 months on the island.

and I plan to do more, so any tips welcome and I mean any. I have decent foot wear but am yet to buy suitable outdoor clothes for changeable weather. I think I may need a freezer bag and hairband for the rain?

Boots are crucial; my motto, spend more for comfort, support, durability and gortex. Out door garb? Gortex. Yes expensive, but how many times per year will you go out? I have a Berghaus gortex outer coat, circa £200, twenty outings a year (conservative) = £10 per outing (a mere sandwich and a drink!). You decide.

Next on the plan are some of the trails in Hong Kong in December
eg: https://thehoneycombers.com/hong-kong/hiking-in-hong-kong-nature-scenery-fitness/

and in about 4 months, the Scottish Munros (which is where kit will be more important
https://www.visitscotland.com/see-do/active/walking/munro-bagging/

Do you mean Kilt? Obligatory!

I will be hiking with non-photographers so can stop for some views or rests but it is not fair to make a habit of it. So for that reason, I expect I need to be able to get a shot quickly and also wont be able to get up super early to make sure the sun is in the optimum place.

I too hike with non-photographers and they seldom wait for me to take the shot!  I'd sometimes prefer primes (Fujis f2s are WR), but I have to be quick so more often than not, I opt for a zoom.

Do you have any tips for shot planning ahead of the hike?
Tips or youtube / books / inspiration for landscape in general

YouTube, yes, local tourist websites, yes, books on the area, yes, but also this forum often proffers excellent advice about locations.

Tips for the selfie / landscape? If I have hiked up to an amazing view, I would quite like to get a shot of me and group in frame.

Don't get too close to the edge and fall over!!!

Tips on carrying gear - I don't plan to carry much photography gear but as weight / bulk will also come from water, a snack / lunch / clothing layers, like a down jacket

I use a day sack optimised for hiking with additional lens and gear, especially additional lenses, in neoprene cases plus added layers, water, snacks, etc, inside it. I find the so-called photo backpacks unsuitable for hiking; poor weight distribution, design and comfort. I carry my camera and zoom lens on a US Op/Tech neoprene strap, which provides great comfort, Sam Browne style; comfortable, convenient and fast into action.

Apps - I use Komoot which is good for route planing but not great for discovering trails.

What do you carry? What camera settings / focal lengths do you use? Can you post pics or links in here? Self portrait / group portraits with landscapes?

I am still recovering from spending on the new kit but could possibly buy a compact travel tripod.

Hope some answers help.

-- hide signature --
 jhorse's gear list:jhorse's gear list
Fujifilm X-E3 Fujifilm X-T3 Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Fujifilm XF 55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS Fujifilm XF 27mm F2.8 +4 more
jjz2 Senior Member • Posts: 1,661
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

jhorse wrote:

kierenlon wrote:

I use a day sack optimised for hiking with additional lens and gear, especially additional lenses, in neoprene cases plus added layers, water, snacks, etc, inside it. I find the so-called photo backpacks unsuitable for hiking; poor weight distribution, design and comfort. I carry my camera and zoom lens on a US Op/Tech neoprene strap, which provides great comfort, Sam Browne style; comfortable, convenient and fast into action.

Apps - I use Komoot which is good for route planing but not great for discovering trails.

What do you carry? What camera settings / focal lengths do you use? Can you post pics or links in here? Self portrait / group portraits with landscapes?

I am still recovering from spending on the new kit but could possibly buy a compact travel tripod.

Hope some answers help.

-- hide signature --

Same. I use an rei day pack and put camera in a small bag inside it. There is a top release on the day pack if I need quick access.

 jjz2's gear list:jjz2's gear list
Fujifilm X-T10 Fujifilm X-T20 Fujifilm XF 27mm F2.8 Fujifilm XF 35mm F2 R WR Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8
TonyGN10 Regular Member • Posts: 128
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
1

kierenlon wrote:

I was going to ask this in the Landscape forum and might have to if this thread fails but I thought fuji specific might be more useful.

I've never really been into landscape photography - mostly doing event and sports with my NIkon. I've just switched to a :

  • Fuji X-T30 - not weather sealed(+2 batteries)
  • 15-45mm kit lens
  • 35mm F1.4
  • 100mm F2.8 adapted Nikon Series E(which is pretty small and light).
  • Gorillapod tripod
  • Godox Flash & trigger

I have also recently enjoyed scenic walks and want to do more of them - starting easy. These are typically day hikes on well worn paths. Often in the range of 5 - 10 miles

My limited experience extends to:

UK - Box Hill
https://www.komoot.com/tour/31679609
(not my tour or pics)

Cyprus
https://www.komoot.com/tour/7383201

and I plan to do more, so any tips welcome and I mean any. I have decent foot wear but am yet to buy suitable outdoor clothes for changeable weather. I think I may need a freezer bag and hairband for the rain?

Next on the plan are some of the trails in Hong Kong in December
eg: https://thehoneycombers.com/hong-kong/hiking-in-hong-kong-nature-scenery-fitness/

and in about 4 months, the Scottish Munros (which is where kit will be more important
https://www.visitscotland.com/see-do/active/walking/munro-bagging/

I will be hiking with non-photographers so can stop for some views or rests but it is not fair to make a habit of it. So for that reason, I expect I need to be able to get a shot quickly and also wont be able to get up super early to make sure the sun is in the optimum place.

Do you have any tips for shot planning ahead of the hike?
Tips or youtube / books / inspiration for landscape in general

Tips for the selfie / landscape? If I have hiked up to an amazing view, I would quite like to get a shot of me and group in frame.

Tips on carrying gear - I don't plan to carry much photography gear but as weight / bulk will also come from water, a snack / lunch / clothing layers, like a down jacket

Apps - I use Komoot which is good for route planing but not great for discovering trails.

What do you carry? What camera settings / focal lengths do you use? Can you post pics or links in here? Self portrait / group portraits with landscapes?

I am still recovering from spending on the new kit but could possibly buy a compact travel tripod.

A lot of good advice in the posts above.

I do a lot of hill walking in Scotland, in groups where I am the only photographer. Not wishing to delay the group and with very quickly changeable (sometimes very bad) weather, frequent lens changing is not a good idea. I have an XT-2 with an 18-135mm  attached to it most of the time - I also carry a Samyang 12mm (wonderful, very light weight) for those unmissable wide shots but mostly it's the 18-135.  A screw-in circular polarising filter is useful. Bracket a lot and sort out later in post. I do take a tripod but it usually doesn't get much use. Take some good microfibre lens cloths for water on lenses.

I use a backpack, most of which carries extra clothes layers, food, water plus camera gear. I have an iPhone - for walking in the UK (especially important in Scottish hills) I use the OutDoors GB app and pre-download OS maps for the walking area, for offline use. Also suggest you take paper map(s) and compass - also download GridPoint GB app which works off-line (i.e. uses GPS) and pin-points exactly your position using OS grid references - makes the paper maps much easier to use - very reassuring!! Take a power bank for re-charging phone/camera plus a spare battery for camera.

In Scotland, starting hill walks from loch level  can be very challenging - a lot of ups and downs!! Even if the weather forecast is good take a warm hat and gloves. As well as your breathable waterproof jacket, get light-weight water proof, breathable over-trousers - I also use gaiters. Midges are a pain - especially on the West Coast of Scotland - take plenty of repellent if you're going to Scotland May to late August.  I pre-plan using Google Earth pro and PhotoPills but plans usually evaporate - so try to get one morning or evening to yourself for some golden light shots Have fun - I love walking and photographing in Scotland!!!

 TonyGN10's gear list:TonyGN10's gear list
Fujifilm X-T2 Samyang 12mm F2.0 NCS CS Fujifilm XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR Phase One Capture One Pro +2 more
TonyGN10 Regular Member • Posts: 128
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

Re landscape inspiration - forgot - look up Thomas Heaton and Nigel Danson on YouTube.

 TonyGN10's gear list:TonyGN10's gear list
Fujifilm X-T2 Samyang 12mm F2.0 NCS CS Fujifilm XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR Phase One Capture One Pro +2 more
zurubi Regular Member • Posts: 245
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

TonyGN10 wrote:

Re landscape inspiration - forgot - look up Thomas Heaton and Nigel Danson on YouTube.

Second this!

 zurubi's gear list:zurubi's gear list
Fujifilm X-E3 Fujifilm X-T3 Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS Fujifilm XF 50-140mm F2.8 Fujifilm 16-55mm F2.8R LM WR +4 more
zurubi Regular Member • Posts: 245
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
1

Lots of hiking and nature here too....

I don’t think I can add too much on the photo advice above which is excellent. I’d say leave the flash and think twice about the tripod (although I always take at least a small one because I love long exposure but you can’t do that too much with non photographers).

sometimes it’s the little things that matter:

-several microfiber cloths, very important when you have mist or rain, also one of those puffers for blowing dust away from lenses.

-some gaffer tape for improvising.

-look at wool clothing (tee shirts, thin socks, underwear). They don’t stink when you sweat! But they are expensive.

-cable release or remove trigger.

enjoy!

 zurubi's gear list:zurubi's gear list
Fujifilm X-E3 Fujifilm X-T3 Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS Fujifilm XF 50-140mm F2.8 Fujifilm 16-55mm F2.8R LM WR +4 more
a_c_skinner Veteran Member • Posts: 8,928
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

The camera and the zoom. Nothing else photogrpahically.

Assuming the UK:

Learn to use a map to plan and navigate - join a local walking group if needs be. This is fantastically liberating.

Learn the technicalities of photography if you've not. On line isn't the right way to do this, get a decent book or two.

Buy a rucksack of about 30l. Keep stuff in it in a waterproof sac. Leave the camera in the bag until you need it.

Get a decent waterproof jacket and boots - essential for comfort.

You don't need survival stuff for lowland Britain, though some food and drink might be a good idea.

There are lots of easy to follow trails. Take a bus to one end and walk to your transport.

Look at South Downs Way, Thames Path, Ridgeway in the south of England. Monsal Trail, Manifold trail, High Peak and Tissington Trails in the Midlands, lots of walks along canals - Huddersfield Narrow, Rochdale and Leeds and Liverpool take you across the Pennines. You cannot get lost on coastal paths. The Dorset coast from Swanage westwards is good. But you really need a map and the ability to use it. You are hog tied without that skill. Don't rely on a phone or gadget for navigation.

But basically just get out and take photos. https://www.flickr.com/photos/hafan_storth/

-- hide signature --

Andrew Skinner

 a_c_skinner's gear list:a_c_skinner's gear list
Fujifilm X-T2 Fujifilm X-E3 Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R Fujifilm XF 14mm F2.8 R Fujifilm XF 55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS +5 more
KariP
KariP Veteran Member • Posts: 5,326
Re: Day Hiking - some inspiration

kierenlon wrote:

I was going to ask this in the Landscape forum and might have to if this thread fails but I thought fuji specific might be more useful.

I've never really been into landscape photography - mostly doing event and sports with my NIkon. I've just switched to a :

  • Fuji X-T30 - not weather sealed(+2 batteries)
  • 15-45mm kit lens
  • 35mm F1.4
  • 100mm F2.8 adapted Nikon Series E(which is pretty small and light).
  • Gorillapod tripod
  • Godox Flash & trigger

I have also recently enjoyed scenic walks and want to do more of them - starting easy. These are typically day hikes on well worn paths. Often in the range of 5 - 10 miles

My limited experience extends to:

UK - Box Hill
https://www.komoot.com/tour/31679609
(not my tour or pics)

Cyprus
https://www.komoot.com/tour/7383201

and I plan to do more, so any tips welcome and I mean any. I have decent foot wear but am yet to buy suitable outdoor clothes for changeable weather. I think I may need a freezer bag and hairband for the rain?

Next on the plan are some of the trails in Hong Kong in December
eg: https://thehoneycombers.com/hong-kong/hiking-in-hong-kong-nature-scenery-fitness/

and in about 4 months, the Scottish Munros (which is where kit will be more important
https://www.visitscotland.com/see-do/active/walking/munro-bagging/

I will be hiking with non-photographers so can stop for some views or rests but it is not fair to make a habit of it. So for that reason, I expect I need to be able to get a shot quickly and also wont be able to get up super early to make sure the sun is in the optimum place.

Do you have any tips for shot planning ahead of the hike?
Tips or youtube / books / inspiration for landscape in general

Tips for the selfie / landscape? If I have hiked up to an amazing view, I would quite like to get a shot of me and group in frame.

Tips on carrying gear - I don't plan to carry much photography gear but as weight / bulk will also come from water, a snack / lunch / clothing layers, like a down jacket

Apps - I use Komoot which is good for route planing but not great for discovering trails.

What do you carry? What camera settings / focal lengths do you use? Can you post pics or links in here? Self portrait / group portraits with landscapes?

I am still recovering from spending on the new kit but could possibly buy a compact travel tripod.

I have two very different areas where I try to do some landscape photography.

My "own" area is in Finland - the Archipelago National Park and some other islands near Hanko - but I'm quite sure you will never visit this area... difficult to hike without a boat

One area that is always great is Switzerland. Difficult to avoid fantastic landscapes. Because tourism has been important for some 150 years and the locals just love hiking, climbing and skiing ,  the country is full of hiking paths, trains, busses and all kinds of elevators you can use.  Very easy make long hikes - and usually there is a restaurant where you can eat and enjoy the view.

Just some water , extra clothes and camera gear in small backpack.

-- hide signature --

Kari
I started SLR film photography in 1968, first DSLR was Canon 40D in 2007. Now Fujifilm X-E3 and X-H1 for nature, walking around ,traveling/landscapes - fantastic 5DMkIV for landscapes, macro , BIF ... .

 KariP's gear list:KariP's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Fujifilm X-E3 Fujifilm X-H1 Canon EF 50mm F1.4 USM Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM +11 more
kierenlon
OP kierenlon Contributing Member • Posts: 770
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

Thanks everyone so far - some great advice - some themes - did try to quote individuals in one single post but that was not as simple as I would have hoped, so sorry if I left names out:

Bill Ferris Porquinho,zurubi
1. Cleaning kit
- So obvious but I hadn't even considered it - thanks. I have a lens brush and blower. I just need to buy a dedicated microfibre cloth

Morris0 Bill Ferris, jhorse,TonyGN10
2. Planning & Apps
Apps = trails
Google /local tourist websites / books / dpreview
Google Earth pro
PhotoPills
Have a plan / kit for getting lost / recused
OutDoors GB app and pre-download OS maps
GridPoint GB app
Nigel Danson - https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Nigel+Danson

Thomas Heaton https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfhW84xfA6gEc4hDK90rR1Q

^ . Thomas I have just started watching. I did not know Nigel, so will start on his catalog too - thanks

Everyone
3. Packing

A general consensus to take a little as possible, so I will aim for just the X-T30 and kit 15-45 lens. The trend was also to leave the tripod but I may still bring the gorillapod as it's light enough and was useful for the all important selfie at the top of a climb. In Cyprus I had to use on camera flash to give some fill on a self portrait (and still pump up shadows in post) so I might bring the flash although probably wont use it much.

At the moment I use a Think Tank retrospective 5 small messager bag. I like that I can move it from hip to back to avoid a sweat contact patch. It's fine for the easy hikes but I am aware I will need a backpack for more serious work, like Scotland.  Most likely one designed for hiking, not walking.

Bill Ferris . jhorse ,TonyGN10 zurubi, a_c_skinner
4. Clothes

A consensus around good clothes. Having recently lost some weight I am in the fortunate position of needing some new clothes. My previous landscape selfies have impressive (to me) landscapes but I look a bit like a dogs dinner, with mismatched clothes that don't fit well and colours that often dont match.

Looking at other online posts, the colour wheel comes in handy with most landscapes hazing to blue / greens I think I will be looking for a jacket that is more dark red ./ orange / mustard to contrast.  I don't want to be on the cover of a magazine but would like my future photos to be a little timeless or at least with good colours on the clothing. 
(I'm keen to be in my own pictures now as on reflection, I am not in many of of my old ones - always behind the lens.   Full auto on the X-T30 makes handing the camera over to a novice easy and the remote app also helps)

Having to buy a new wardrobe due to my reduced waist size, I also notice that I keep clothes a long time and the ones I spent a little bit more on, have kept their shape and colour. I'm probably going to look at some timeless colours, that match - perhaps some merino tops, linen shirts for the hot treks etc. Essentially a capsule wardrobe.

We recently went to Wales and had to do some work outside in light rain - none of us "townies" had proper waterproofs, so our hosts rolled their eyes and leant us waterproof gear that was 15 - 20 years old but had stood the test of time. This has encouraged me not to go cheap (although I'm not rich, so will be on a budget).

Most of the trails I have done recently can be done in trainers. I have good gortex boots (bought 10 years ago) for trickier landscapes. The sole on them is quite sticky so I don't slip easily on wet rocks.

For jackets, 3 layer seems the way to go. Alpkit is seems to be a well regarded and good value UK brand, so I will probably go for their 3 layer jacket once I recover from buying the Fuji & accessories

https://www.alpkit.com/collections/mens-outerlayer

5. Skills
I had basic map reading skills about 25 years ago. I have zero skill now thanks to the "smart" phone. That is something I need to re-learn. No doubt there are good guides I can find online.

 kierenlon's gear list:kierenlon's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon D7000 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Nikon AF-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED +4 more
a_c_skinner Veteran Member • Posts: 8,928
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration
2

Cleaning kit:

Re-think this. People clean obsessively. I did when I first had a camera (1974 ish). You don't need to, you just risk damage. I cannot remember ever cleaning something when out of the home. I did wipe a fingerprint off the front of a lens about a year ago, but other than that not done lens cleaning for years.

Sensors are different. Even if you don't change the lens much or at all you will get sensor dust. A Rocket type blower will deal with this most of the time and you will sooner or later need to clean the sensor properly. Don't even think of cleaning the sensor routinely, dust invariably spots out with software and that is the time to clean it with a blower. Getting someone to clean it for you is easy in UK but not difficult to do yourself either.

Cleaning - the best thing to do is to forget it until it is unavoidable. Honestly.

Edit: as an after thought start by planning to go out in good weather and get a cheap, even disposable poncho "in case".

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Andrew Skinner

 a_c_skinner's gear list:a_c_skinner's gear list
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biza43 Forum Pro • Posts: 11,730
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

Start with the XT30 and kit zoom. More than capable and light.

These days I normally hike with the XH1 and 16-55, but I don't mind the weight.

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 biza43's gear list:biza43's gear list
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supernova86 Junior Member • Posts: 27
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

For hikes I always bring the Fuji XT20 with the 16-50 f3.5 kit lens that I got specifically because I wanted something light for hiking. Sometimes also carry the Samyang 12mm f2. I am very happy with both of them.

I barely ever carry a big tripod as it is cumbersome but I do carry a small tripod with a ballhead which I love and its similar in size and design to the Manfrotto Pixi. I find it extremely useful.

What I think its awesome for hiking and I will definitely buy soon is the Peak Design Clip. Just attach it to the backpack strap and the camera is secure and easily accessible. My only concern is that with the XT20/XT30, it will block the battery compartment so changing batteries isnt as easy.

Regarding destinations, my girlfriend and I are planning to go to the Scottish Highlands soon, cant wait! The one I enjoyed the most in the UK so far was Snowdonia.

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GossCTP Veteran Member • Posts: 5,151
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

You said well worn paths, so I'm not sure if this is applicable, but if footing is ever in question a hiking pole can keep you from falling on top of your camera. You can use two, but I find the benefits of a second pole marginal. If you are crafty or can find an existing product they can also double as a monopod. I suppose one could just use a monopod though they tend to have fat ends that would probably not do to well at gaining purchase on slippery ground.

In the same vein, if you are walking along a slope, wear the camera on the downhill side. If you fall it will be from your feet sliding down a wet root, causing you to fall into the slope.

In my case I would probably grab my Pentax with the 16-85 as I think that's one application it still excels at based on battery life and degree of weather sealing.

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ichollad Forum Member • Posts: 56
Re: Day Hiking Advice or inspiration

One more vote for the Peak Design Capture Clip.  It's not necessary for short walks, but for longer hikes (where you need a backpack for food/water/layers rather than just a light sling) it's much more comfortable than a neck or shoulder strap.  It's a bit pricey for what it is, but I've found it transformative.  One note - it's going to block the screw hole on the bottom of your Fuji, so it won't be compatible with your Joby gorilla-pod.  On the other hand, I've got one of those mini-tripods too but rarely if ever use it when hiking in a group - see the next paragraph.

If you're hiking with non-photographers, you will want something that keeps your camera at the ready and out of your backpack/sling.  Your friends aren't going to want to wait around while you take your bag off/get your camera out/set up for the photo/pack your camera up/put your bag back on.  You'll probably get tired of that routine yourself.

I don't worry too much about WR gear, although I usually hike in dry environments.  If the weather turns bad I just put all the electronics in a plastic bag in my backpack (for which I have a rain cover, but those aren't 100% reliable).

 ichollad's gear list:ichollad's gear list
Fujifilm X-T3 Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Fujifilm XF 55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS Fujifilm XF 35mm F2 R WR Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8
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