Does technique change with advances in cameras?

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
OP Marek M Senior Member • Posts: 1,968
Re: Sunny California . . .

TacticDesigns wrote:

Marek M wrote:

I have been an Aperture priority type of guy for the longest time. Auto ISO has been a no-no.

I saw my friend's pictures from a recent party, Leica Q, and he is a Shutter priority AND auto ISO shooter.

I guess I have to re-think my ways. 10 years ago , an auto ISO would be a bummer , but now, with relatively clean ISO 6400, and usable ISO 12800, things are different.

So, time to re-think my habits. and technique. All owing to better cameras.

Another thing that I think can change your habits and re-think things is changing where you shoot and what you shoot.

I have shot a lot of indoor sports. So . . . a lot of shooting in less than ideal light.

So, my attack on the situation has been to get faster lenses (f/2.8 zooms), and shoot manual exposure settings to try to squeeze out as much IQ as possible.

For the most part, I choose an aperture that will give me the depth of field I can live with. Then pick a shutter speed that tries to reduce motion blur in the athletes. And then play around with ISO to make sure I am happy with the final images.

Shooting in those conditions, I really didn't feel comfortable using shutter priority.

But this summer, we took a trip to Sunny California. My oldest daughter wanted to try surfing. So I had taken my Nikon D7000 with a Nikon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 superzoom in it.

When I started shooting, I realized there was a lot of light. A lot more light than I usually shoot in.

And then it clicked.

I could totally shooting shutter priority with a manual ISO setting, even though I was using a superzoom with an aperture range of f/3.5-5-6.

There was just that much light!

For years, I read of photographers using shutter priority. But I was never able to make it work. But . . . this experience showed me that . . . just because it didn't make sense for me, and what I was shooting, it can make sense for someone else for what they are shooting.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

Yep, it feels like starting fresh all over again.

OP Marek M Senior Member • Posts: 1,968
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

Gato Amarillo wrote:

And cheap storage means I can shoot as much as I want, no more rationing film or card space. No more thinking, "this would make a pretty good shot, but maybe I should save film in case there is something better around the corner." (But I still follow the old rule: Cull mercilessly and only show your best stuff.)

I did not mention it in my OP, but that is another thing that friend of mine told me.

He comes from old film days as well. Now, whenever he goes on a photo walk or trip, he sets himself a limit to the number of picture that he will take. And no matter what, he sticks to that limit. He says his pictures have become better, he does not just click away like most  others, myself included, do. That is another thing I will try. Mind you, with my recent film trial, I will be naturally limited.

And that doesn't even touch on all the possibilities of post processing.

Gato

TacticDesigns
TacticDesigns Veteran Member • Posts: 7,190
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

Marek M wrote:

Gato Amarillo wrote:

And cheap storage means I can shoot as much as I want, no more rationing film or card space. No more thinking, "this would make a pretty good shot, but maybe I should save film in case there is something better around the corner." (But I still follow the old rule: Cull mercilessly and only show your best stuff.)

I did not mention it in my OP, but that is another thing that friend of mine told me.

He comes from old film days as well. Now, whenever he goes on a photo walk or trip, he sets himself a limit to the number of picture that he will take. And no matter what, he sticks to that limit. He says his pictures have become better, he does not just click away like most others, myself included, do. That is another thing I will try. Mind you, with my recent film trial, I will be naturally limited.

IMHO I think it is a great exercise.

For the walks I used to do, there would be walks I wouldn't take any pictures because I didn't see anything I was interested in shooting.

But . . . again . . . getting back to the OP, having digital and that meaning I was not paying for film, or having to change film after 24 or 36 shots, I could go after more shots.

This allowed me to try to get shots of as many athletes on my daughters gymnastics or cheer teams.

If shooting an event that only happens once, having digital allows you to shoot first and ask questions later.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

And that doesn't even touch on all the possibilities of post processing.

Gato

-- hide signature --
 TacticDesigns's gear list:TacticDesigns's gear list
Fujifilm XP80 Nikon D5100 Pentax Q Nikon D750 Pentax *ist DS +9 more
OP Marek M Senior Member • Posts: 1,968
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

TacticDesigns wrote:

Marek M wrote:

Gato Amarillo wrote:

And cheap storage means I can shoot as much as I want, no more rationing film or card space. No more thinking, "this would make a pretty good shot, but maybe I should save film in case there is something better around the corner." (But I still follow the old rule: Cull mercilessly and only show your best stuff.)

I did not mention it in my OP, but that is another thing that friend of mine told me.

He comes from old film days as well. Now, whenever he goes on a photo walk or trip, he sets himself a limit to the number of picture that he will take. And no matter what, he sticks to that limit. He says his pictures have become better, he does not just click away like most others, myself included, do. That is another thing I will try. Mind you, with my recent film trial, I will be naturally limited.

IMHO I think it is a great exercise.

For the walks I used to do, there would be walks I wouldn't take any pictures because I didn't see anything I was interested in shooting.

But . . . again . . . getting back to the OP, having digital and that meaning I was not paying for film, or having to change film after 24 or 36 shots, I could go after more shots.

This allowed me to try to get shots of as many athletes on my daughters gymnastics or cheer teams.

If shooting an event that only happens once, having digital allows you to shoot first and ask questions later.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

Sure, it's not an iron rule, rather an exercise worth trying.

And that doesn't even touch on all the possibilities of post processing.

Gato

TacticDesigns
TacticDesigns Veteran Member • Posts: 7,190
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

Marek M wrote:

TacticDesigns wrote:

Marek M wrote:

Gato Amarillo wrote:

And cheap storage means I can shoot as much as I want, no more rationing film or card space. No more thinking, "this would make a pretty good shot, but maybe I should save film in case there is something better around the corner." (But I still follow the old rule: Cull mercilessly and only show your best stuff.)

I did not mention it in my OP, but that is another thing that friend of mine told me.

He comes from old film days as well. Now, whenever he goes on a photo walk or trip, he sets himself a limit to the number of picture that he will take. And no matter what, he sticks to that limit. He says his pictures have become better, he does not just click away like most others, myself included, do. That is another thing I will try. Mind you, with my recent film trial, I will be naturally limited.

IMHO I think it is a great exercise.

For the walks I used to do, there would be walks I wouldn't take any pictures because I didn't see anything I was interested in shooting.

But . . . again . . . getting back to the OP, having digital and that meaning I was not paying for film, or having to change film after 24 or 36 shots, I could go after more shots.

This allowed me to try to get shots of as many athletes on my daughters gymnastics or cheer teams.

If shooting an event that only happens once, having digital allows you to shoot first and ask questions later.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

Sure, it's not an iron rule, rather an exercise worth trying.

+1

Yes. I'd agree.

Just getting back to the OP in that going digital changed my technique in that it made trying to get this many shoots possible in a financial way.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

And that doesn't even touch on all the possibilities of post processing.

Gato

-- hide signature --
 TacticDesigns's gear list:TacticDesigns's gear list
Fujifilm XP80 Nikon D5100 Pentax Q Nikon D750 Pentax *ist DS +9 more
sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 3,746
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

Marek M wrote:

I have been an Aperture priority type of guy for the longest time. Auto ISO has been a no-no.

I saw my friend's pictures from a recent party, Leica Q, and he is a Shutter priority AND auto ISO shooter.

I guess I have to re-think my ways. 10 years ago , an auto ISO would be a bummer , but now, with relatively clean ISO 6400, and usable ISO 12800, things are different.

So, time to re-think my habits. and technique. All owing to better cameras.

IMO not really.

Auto ISO has gotten better, bu this also depends on the camera itself and it's ISO performance.

But for example, shooting at slow shutter speeds in low light, no technique doesn't really change that much . You still need to try to brace yourself to avoid camera shake, even if you have IBIS for example. You'll probably have more keepers in those instances in low light than one without IBIS but with that example, you should still exercise the same technique you would even if you didn't have IBIS.  It never hurts to go back to basics and implement the basic techniques for getting the shot, whatever those might be.

The new advanced just make it easier to cope with situations that might be challenging (like with IBIS or eye-AF).

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Fujifilm X-T30 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G +19 more
OP Marek M Senior Member • Posts: 1,968
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

Marek M wrote:

I have been an Aperture priority type of guy for the longest time. Auto ISO has been a no-no.

I saw my friend's pictures from a recent party, Leica Q, and he is a Shutter priority AND auto ISO shooter.

I guess I have to re-think my ways. 10 years ago , an auto ISO would be a bummer , but now, with relatively clean ISO 6400, and usable ISO 12800, things are different.

So, time to re-think my habits. and technique. All owing to better cameras.

IMO not really.

Auto ISO has gotten better, bu this also depends on the camera itself and it's ISO performance.

But for example, shooting at slow shutter speeds in low light, no technique doesn't really change that much . You still need to try to brace yourself to avoid camera shake, even if you have IBIS for example. You'll probably have more keepers in those instances in low light than one without IBIS but with that example, you should still exercise the same technique you would even if you didn't have IBIS. It never hurts to go back to basics and implement the basic techniques for getting the shot, whatever those might be.

You are describing one situation only and camera holding technique. I agree that those basics do not change, I was referring to something different.

The new advanced just make it easier to cope with situations that might be challenging (like with IBIS or eye-AF).

For sure.

BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 2,348
Gear, Different Objective, Different Technique

Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

For me, it does. A camera and flash with very High Flash Synch speed and good Auto ISO expands my choice of exposure settings.

I have use practically every combination of Auto Exposure, Semi-Auto, and fully manual exposure plus Auto ISO

My Nikon D8XX gives me more options than my Nikon D5XXX.
Moreover,  Nissin MG8000 Supreme and Nikon SB-910 further expand my flash assisted shooting technique..

In tricky lighting condition on non-static subjectI I use  MANUAL zone focusing, sometimes continuous Auto focus. In general, I use "Back focus.  I get good results at Manual setting of Shutter speed at faster than the inverse of the focal length and f/5.6 plus Auto ISO.
.

Do what works for you.  I believe there is more than just one way to skin a cat. 
Try other method suggested by others or just out of curiousity, What have you got to loose?

LoneTree1
LoneTree1 Senior Member • Posts: 2,801
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

The trick to shooting with high ISO is to fill the frame with the subject.  The moment you have to crop much, the noise overwhelms.

Barry Twycross Senior Member • Posts: 2,192
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

My basic technique hasn't changed, unless there's a good reason why some fancy new feature will get me shots I wouldn't otherwise.

I still set the ISO, to the lowest, before even starting.

When I want to take a pic, I set aperture and shutter speed to zero out the meter. With the latest camera, there's a button to do that for me. And the meter actually does a good job of getting the exposure right, no more spotting on a neutral-ish subject and guessing. Though I usually dial it down 2/3 from what it wants to set.

I might use the preview here, that's handy.

Then I focus on the subject. Now I have a button which does that for me. Recompose, shoot. Simple, just like I always did. Though the camera now will do a 3 burst bracket at 0, -2/3, +2/3 for me. So I don't have to twiddle and manually bracket.

Then I can review the shot, that's the best thing digital photography ever did. It used to take at least an hour for this part, now it's instant.

If the subject doesn't suite the laconic style, I might employ a more advanced feature, like CAF, alternative focus points, high speed drive, higher ISO, or auto modes.

 Barry Twycross's gear list:Barry Twycross's gear list
Panasonic GX850 Panasonic Lumix G Vario HD 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega OIS Leica Nocticron 42.5mm Panasonic Lumix G Vario 35-100mm F4.0-5.6 ASPH Mega OIS Panasonic 20mm F1.7 II +3 more
yardcoyote Forum Pro • Posts: 12,383
Re: Does technique change with advances in cameras?

Definitely. Even better, a camera that lets you set several limits. I like to set one at 400 ISO for outdoors, one at  800 or 1000 for indoors or just for greater flexibility ( especially as regards shutter speed) and the last at whatever I  consider the maximum usable ISO for that camera, for when I  want to move fast or dont know what to expect.

-- hide signature --

Instagram: @yardcoyote

 yardcoyote's gear list:yardcoyote's gear list
Fujifilm X10 Fujifilm X100T Fujifilm X-Pro1 Pentax K-5 IIs Fujifilm X-M1 +18 more
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads