iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii Locked

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Don Lacy
Don Lacy Senior Member • Posts: 2,115
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

Lee Jay wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

These are really close, even in lower light which is crazy.

No they aren't.

How's that iPhone do in low-light at 400mm-equivalent and a fixed shutter speed of 1/400th to freeze motion?

Answer: The iPhone won't even get a shot, while the SLR and 400/2.8 will get great shots.

How did the 1DXii do in the video in the shots with a subject in front of a window? Very poorly, it blew everything in the background out while the iPhone nailed it. The 1DX couldn’t even handle the following outdoor shots in the video with the guy under the tree, it blew out the sky while again, the iPhone nailed it. The iPhone has superior IQ to a $5500 full frame camera with a quality $2000 lens which is very impressive.

No they do not what you so conveniently leave out or are ignorant of is the iPhone image is a multi shot HDR processed image while the 1DX image is not. Now if you compared  a properly processed 1DX image taken by someone who knows what they are doing the inferiority of the iPhone file would be painfully obvious. So if you want to be impressed by something it  should be the engines at Apple who wrote the code that allows any uniformed user to get images under tricky lighting conditions.

They both have their strengths and weaknesses. With the iPhones Night Mode and an aftermarket lens, I wouldn’t assume the iPhone won’t even get a shot in the scenario you listed above.

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tkbslc Forum Pro • Posts: 13,659
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

mamallama wrote:

I don't think the smartphone companies are targeting professional photographers with their smartphone cameras. But as they increase their camera capabilities and using smarter computational techniques smartphone results are encroaching upon the qualities in many situations that were heretofore only available with large cameras and experienced photographers. Sure, if you pixel peep you can detect the differences, but it is still causing concern because it is affecting the camera market.

I don't think they are targeting pros, either.   But videos like this confirm for Regular Joes that they probably don't need anything more than a smartphone.    Someone who has a 1DX already knows why they have it.

tko Forum Pro • Posts: 13,035
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

A very reasonable explanation. And it means that depending on your needs and output target, the iPhone very well may be better.

It may very well be better for your needs if you want Youtube video resolution in nonchallenging situations.

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(unknown member) Forum Member • Posts: 81
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

These are really close, even in lower light which is crazy. Most trained photographers will be able to spot the iPhone shots because of the aggressive bokeh, not because the overall photo is inferior quality, but your average person would never be able to spot that. I think if he had edited the iPhone photos by increasing the aperture slider to more match the look of the bokeh in the 1DX, they would pretty indistinguishable. The bokeh in portrait mode looks too mushy and fake to me if the aperture is anything more than about f/4 in most shots. You really have to watch it and adjust accordingly.

The most surprising thing here to me was at the 4 minute mark. The iPhone nails the tricky lighting situations where the 1DX struggles and blows out the backgrounds and sky. It’s those things like smart HDR, Night Mode, and now Deep Fusion, that are making these smartphone cameras really good these days and in some cases, even better than high end cameras.

https://youtu.be/6irorkXCLyw

Seems like you want some kind of better/more intelligent 'auto' mode for the 1DX. Not entirely unreasonable, but why would Canon invest in implementing that if that is not the reason people buy the 1DX? Nobody in their right mind is cross-shopping between the 1DX and a smartphone. Its a bit like complaining dump trucks don't have sun-roofs or in-built seat massagers or rear seat DVD players.

MOD Biggs23 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,595
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

Biggs23 wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

These are really close, even in lower light which is crazy. Most trained photographers will be able to spot the iPhone shots because of the aggressive bokeh, not because the overall photo is inferior quality, but your average person would never be able to spot that. I think if he had edited the iPhone photos by increasing the aperture slider to more match the look of the bokeh in the 1DX, they would pretty indistinguishable. The bokeh in portrait mode looks too mushy and fake to me if the aperture is anything more than about f/4 in most shots. You really have to watch it and adjust accordingly.

The most surprising thing here to me was at the 4 minute mark. The iPhone nails the tricky lighting situations where the 1DX struggles and blows out the backgrounds and sky. It’s those things like smart HDR, Night Mode, and now Deep Fusion, that are making these smartphone cameras really good these days and in some cases, even better than high end cameras.

https://youtu.be/6irorkXCLyw

The key to these videos (and the MANY) like it, is simple: Take generic shots that do not in any way challenge a camera and then embed them into a video. Additional step: do not provide the images in full resolution for viewers to examine.
When you actually attempt to compare the two things with integrity, it simply doesn't work out. It's much harder to get tens of thousands of clicks that way.

Summary: Fake news.

Fair points but I think those shots at the 4 minute mark with the tricky lighting thru the window challenges cameras, and the 1DX lost badly,...

Put a competent photographer behind the camera, and the post processing that goes with it, and no, it would not lose. It's like saying Mike Tyson would lose to me in a boxing ring as long as his hands were tied behind his back. Might be true, but is definitely pointless to say.

even the outdoor shots that follow it, look how the 1DX blew out the sky but the iPhone nailed it, that’s RAW vs JPEG too. Why do you need full resolution photos to pixel peep at 300%?

Not 300%. Not even 100%. The difference is VERY obvious at even 60%.

The people looking at your photos aren’t doing that. They are looking at them just as we are in this video.

No, they aren't. They are looking at them on their walls.

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mamallama
mamallama Forum Pro • Posts: 56,927
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Kapil Kapre wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

These are really close, even in lower light which is crazy. Most trained photographers will be able to spot the iPhone shots because of the aggressive bokeh, not because the overall photo is inferior quality, but your average person would never be able to spot that. I think if he had edited the iPhone photos by increasing the aperture slider to more match the look of the bokeh in the 1DX, they would pretty indistinguishable. The bokeh in portrait mode looks too mushy and fake to me if the aperture is anything more than about f/4 in most shots. You really have to watch it and adjust accordingly.

The most surprising thing here to me was at the 4 minute mark. The iPhone nails the tricky lighting situations where the 1DX struggles and blows out the backgrounds and sky. It’s those things like smart HDR, Night Mode, and now Deep Fusion, that are making these smartphone cameras really good these days and in some cases, even better than high end cameras.

https://youtu.be/6irorkXCLyw

Seems like you want some kind of better/more intelligent 'auto' mode for the 1DX. Not entirely unreasonable, but why would Canon invest in implementing that if that is not the reason people buy the 1DX? Nobody in their right mind is cross-shopping between the 1DX and a smartphone. Its a bit like complaining dump trucks don't have sun-roofs or in-built seat massagers or rear seat DVD players.

Canon shouldn’t do anything different if they can keep on selling 1DXs and other cameras at the rate they want. Otherwise maybe they should do something different.

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john Clinch
john Clinch Veteran Member • Posts: 4,065
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

These threads get silly far go quickly

It would of course be nice to compare  full resolution images. I really wish dpreview would add a few phones so we can see them on a level playing field. I do wonder why we haven't see this. I suspect it's because the phones aren't a bad as some hope.

But here is another question. Why can't modem cameras not do the same clever tricks as phones. I read a phone review in amateur photographer. I wanted to read about using RAW. Their conclusion was don't bother. They couldn't get the RAW to match the jpg.

Just imagine what a full frame camera could do of it could stack and average 10 images removing ghosting as it went without me needing to play on Photoshop. Or do in cameras HDR as well as a phone.

The answer is of course that camera manafactureres don't have the software. How long will we put up with that?

AOC
AOC Regular Member • Posts: 284
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Kapil Kapre wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

These are really close, even in lower light which is crazy. Most trained photographers will be able to spot the iPhone shots because of the aggressive bokeh, not because the overall photo is inferior quality, but your average person would never be able to spot that. I think if he had edited the iPhone photos by increasing the aperture slider to more match the look of the bokeh in the 1DX, they would pretty indistinguishable. The bokeh in portrait mode looks too mushy and fake to me if the aperture is anything more than about f/4 in most shots. You really have to watch it and adjust accordingly.

The most surprising thing here to me was at the 4 minute mark. The iPhone nails the tricky lighting situations where the 1DX struggles and blows out the backgrounds and sky. It’s those things like smart HDR, Night Mode, and now Deep Fusion, that are making these smartphone cameras really good these days and in some cases, even better than high end cameras.

https://youtu.be/6irorkXCLyw

Seems like you want some kind of better/more intelligent 'auto' mode for the 1DX. Not entirely unreasonable, but why would Canon invest in implementing that if that is not the reason people buy the 1DX? Nobody in their right mind is cross-shopping between the 1DX and a smartphone. Its a bit like complaining dump trucks don't have sun-roofs or in-built seat massagers or rear seat DVD players.

Actually, the 1Dx, A9, and D5 might be better likened to pickup trucks.

And pickup trucks have become both powerful and posh, evidenced by such hot-sellers as the King Ranch, Ram Laramie, and Ridgeline Black edition and others--which do have heated seats, rear-seat displays, and sun-roofs, among many other amenities once strangers to the segment.

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Mika Y.
Mika Y. Senior Member • Posts: 1,304
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

So,  I suppose you have already sold your dedicated camera equipment and started working with just the iPhone..?

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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,701
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

sluggy_warrior wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

How did the 1DXii do in the video in the shots with a subject in front of a window? Very poorly, it blew everything in the background out while the iPhone nailed it. The 1DX couldn’t even handle the following outdoor shots in the video with the guy under the tree, it blew out the sky while again, the iPhone nailed it. The iPhone has superior IQ to a $5500 full frame camera with a quality $2000 lens which is very impressive. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. With the iPhones Night Mode and an aftermarket lens, I wouldn’t assume the iPhone won’t even get a shot in the scenario you listed above.

What is your definition of IQ?

I hate to repeat myself here, but the only advantage a phone has is convenience. The software is smart enough to make the mediocre image looks decent, but there's nothing it can do that post-processing the RAW can't. A desktop software is much more powerful and have no real-time constraint.

The smartphone makes it easy for its user. The camera leaves the control and creativity to the photographer. If the photographer doesn't know how to shoot and process a backlit scene, s/he probably should just switch to using the smartphone if s/he doesn't want to invest time into learning/mastering her/his tool.

Sorry to everyone else, I'm bored at lunch and feel like feeding the trolls. Expecting FluidKnowledge and Brick Wall to jump in soon

My definition of IQ is reading a scene and delivering a quality photo and thats where the iPhone has the advantage. Things like Smart HDR, Deep Fusion and Night Mode. We have all sat there with a DSLR or mirrorless fussing with our settings in a heavily backlit scene like the window shots in that video. The iPhone nails it with no fussing, point and shoot, thats superior IQ. The shot with the guy in front of the tree came out better on the iPhone too. While the camera is just shooing one image, the iPhone has already taken several images before you have even taken the shot and then takes several more, analyzes and combines them all and gives you the best shot within a second. Thats superior IQ and a camera can not even come close to matching that tech.

OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,701
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

john Clinch wrote:

But here is another question. Why can't modem cameras not do the same clever tricks as phones. I read a phone review in amateur photographer. I wanted to read about using RAW. Their conclusion was don't bother. They couldn't get the RAW to match the jpg.

Just imagine what a full frame camera could do of it could stack and average 10 images removing ghosting as it went without me needing to play on Photoshop. Or do in cameras HDR as well as a phone.

The answer is of course that camera manafactureres don't have the software. How long will we put up with that?

Sony, Canon, Nikon and every other camera manufacturer will never match tech giants like Apple or Google when it comes to processing power. The A13 chip runs circles around any processor a camera company has ever put in a camera, its not even close. It beats out most PCs in benchmarks. It would be like Apple trying to make lenses to compete with Canon, will never happen.

Rishi Sanyal
Rishi Sanyal dpreview Admin • Posts: 898
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Stroker wrote:

Lee Jay wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

These are really close, even in lower light which is crazy.

No they aren't.

How's that iPhone do in low-light at 400mm-equivalent and a fixed shutter speed of 1/400th to freeze motion?

Answer: The iPhone won't even get a shot, while the SLR and 400/2.8 will get great shots.

The iPhone can shoot at 1/125,000 sec.

How's that 1DXii to shoot at a fixed shutter speed of 1/125,000th to freeze motion?

Answer: The 1DXii won't even get a shot, while the iPhone will get a great one!

One thing to keep in mind is that the shutter rate of the (electronic-only) iPhone shutter is slower than that of the mechanical shutter on the 1DX II or most ILCs. I measure it to be roughly 1/120s on the main camera and 1/60s on the 2x telephoto. Compare that to ~1/300s for ILCs. This means that even with the high shutter speeds electronic shutters can offer (1/32,000 sec on a9), you're going to be limited by the shutter rate.

All non-global shutters are limited this way, including ILCs. It's just that 1/300s shutter rate is a lot better than 1/120s on the iPhone (which is actually really impressive, & is what allows it to read out 4K video at 120 fps for 60Hz HDR video), or the ~1/30s I'm measuring on the Google Pixel phones.

Note that the result of these slower shutter rates won't look like motion blur, but motion will be skewed from top to bottom. Think rolling shutter in video.

Also, what sort of motion are you shooting that requires 1/125,000 sec to freeze? 1/8000s is fast enough to freeze most motion you're likely to encounter.
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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,701
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

tko wrote:

A very reasonable explanation. And it means that depending on your needs and output target, the iPhone very well may be better.

It may very well be better for your needs if you want Youtube video resolution in nonchallenging situations.

This doesn't look like "YouTube video resolution" to me. Oh, and the iPhone has been able to shoot in 4k 60p for years. DSLRs and mirrorless...still waiting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JoTCFbq5NP4

Lee Jay Forum Pro • Posts: 55,260
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

sluggy_warrior wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

How did the 1DXii do in the video in the shots with a subject in front of a window? Very poorly, it blew everything in the background out while the iPhone nailed it. The 1DX couldn’t even handle the following outdoor shots in the video with the guy under the tree, it blew out the sky while again, the iPhone nailed it. The iPhone has superior IQ to a $5500 full frame camera with a quality $2000 lens which is very impressive. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. With the iPhones Night Mode and an aftermarket lens, I wouldn’t assume the iPhone won’t even get a shot in the scenario you listed above.

What is your definition of IQ?

I hate to repeat myself here, but the only advantage a phone has is convenience. The software is smart enough to make the mediocre image looks decent, but there's nothing it can do that post-processing the RAW can't. A desktop software is much more powerful and have no real-time constraint.

The smartphone makes it easy for its user. The camera leaves the control and creativity to the photographer. If the photographer doesn't know how to shoot and process a backlit scene, s/he probably should just switch to using the smartphone if s/he doesn't want to invest time into learning/mastering her/his tool.

Sorry to everyone else, I'm bored at lunch and feel like feeding the trolls. Expecting FluidKnowledge and Brick Wall to jump in soon

My definition of IQ is reading a scene and delivering a quality photo and thats where the iPhone has the advantage.

That's the definition of good auto-modes, not the definition of good image quality.

Things like Smart HDR, Deep Fusion and Night Mode. We have all sat there with a DSLR or mirrorless fussing with our settings in a heavily backlit scene like the window shots in that video.

No, I just use a little pop of fill-flash.

The iPhone nails it with no fussing, point and shoot, thats superior IQ.

No, that's superior convenience.  Maybe you thought IQ stood for something other than image quality?

The shot with the guy in front of the tree came out better on the iPhone too. While the camera is just shooing one image, the iPhone has already taken several images before you have even taken the shot and then takes several more, analyzes and combines them all and gives you the best shot within a second. Thats superior IQ and a camera can not even come close to matching that tech.

One thing I hate about shooting with cell phones is that it's just so darned slow.  I can often get several shots at several different focal lengths and framing while the person next to me is unlocking their phone, and that's starting with a camera that's off.

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Lee Jay

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24IS
24IS Senior Member • Posts: 1,353
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

sluggy_warrior wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

How did the 1DXii do in the video in the shots with a subject in front of a window? Very poorly, it blew everything in the background out while the iPhone nailed it. The 1DX couldn’t even handle the following outdoor shots in the video with the guy under the tree, it blew out the sky while again, the iPhone nailed it. The iPhone has superior IQ to a $5500 full frame camera with a quality $2000 lens which is very impressive. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. With the iPhones Night Mode and an aftermarket lens, I wouldn’t assume the iPhone won’t even get a shot in the scenario you listed above.

What is your definition of IQ?

I hate to repeat myself here, but the only advantage a phone has is convenience. The software is smart enough to make the mediocre image looks decent, but there's nothing it can do that post-processing the RAW can't. A desktop software is much more powerful and have no real-time constraint.

The smartphone makes it easy for its user. The camera leaves the control and creativity to the photographer. If the photographer doesn't know how to shoot and process a backlit scene, s/he probably should just switch to using the smartphone if s/he doesn't want to invest time into learning/mastering her/his tool.

Sorry to everyone else, I'm bored at lunch and feel like feeding the trolls. Expecting FluidKnowledge and Brick Wall to jump in soon

My definition of IQ is reading a scene and delivering a quality photo and thats where the iPhone has the advantage. Things like Smart HDR, Deep Fusion and Night Mode. We have all sat there with a DSLR or mirrorless fussing with our settings in a heavily backlit scene like the window shots in that video. The iPhone nails it with no fussing, point and shoot, thats superior IQ. The shot with the guy in front of the tree came out better on the iPhone too. While the camera is just shooing one image, the iPhone has already taken several images before you have even taken the shot and then takes several more, analyzes and combines them all and gives you the best shot within a second. Thats superior IQ and a camera can not even come close to matching that tech.

I get the distinct impression that you are missing the point about the purpose of a camera instrument that is used by a professional.  What you see as an advantage in the performance and output of the Apple phone would never be accepted by a pro in a scenario where every scene element is expected to be registered as the camera sees it (in a manner of speaking).  The blown highlights in the image that correspond to the area of the image brightly lit by sunlight are blown because of the difference between proper exposure for indoor scene elements versus those out in the sunshine.  If you want to correctly expose for both, you have to illuminate the indoor scene elements to match the light intensity out of doors.  The pro does not second-guess this, or expect camera software to cook up some sort of HDR miracle based on AI.  You don't rely on your camera to do that for you.  Instead, you set up the elements of your photograph to obtain the result you want.

OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,701
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

24IS wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

My definition of IQ is reading a scene and delivering a quality photo and thats where the iPhone has the advantage. Things like Smart HDR, Deep Fusion and Night Mode. We have all sat there with a DSLR or mirrorless fussing with our settings in a heavily backlit scene like the window shots in that video. The iPhone nails it with no fussing, point and shoot, thats superior IQ. The shot with the guy in front of the tree came out better on the iPhone too. While the camera is just shooing one image, the iPhone has already taken several images before you have even taken the shot and then takes several more, analyzes and combines them all and gives you the best shot within a second. Thats superior IQ and a camera can not even come close to matching that tech.

I get the distinct impression that you are missing the point about the purpose of a camera instrument that is used by a professional. What you see as an advantage in the performance and output of the Apple phone would never be accepted by a pro in a scenario where every scene element is expected to be registered as the camera sees it (in a manner of speaking). The blown highlights in the image that correspond to the area of the image brightly lit by sunlight are blown because of the difference between proper exposure for indoor scene elements versus those out in the sunshine. If you want to correctly expose for both, you have to illuminate the indoor scene elements to match the light intensity out of doors. The pro does not second-guess this, or expect camera software to cook up some sort of HDR miracle based on AI. You don't rely on your camera to do that for you. Instead, you set up the elements of your photograph to obtain the result you want.

Right. So what you've just said is that you need to add a fill flash to those indoor scenes for a proper photo on a DSLR. Thats more time, more money, more work and an additional accessory to have to carry around. The iPhone doesn't need to use its flash, it can properly expose that scene without an issue. The smart HDR software is that good. This is one area the iPhone is superior to a DSLR/mirrorless camera.

24IS
24IS Senior Member • Posts: 1,353
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

24IS wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

My definition of IQ is reading a scene and delivering a quality photo and thats where the iPhone has the advantage. Things like Smart HDR, Deep Fusion and Night Mode. We have all sat there with a DSLR or mirrorless fussing with our settings in a heavily backlit scene like the window shots in that video. The iPhone nails it with no fussing, point and shoot, thats superior IQ. The shot with the guy in front of the tree came out better on the iPhone too. While the camera is just shooing one image, the iPhone has already taken several images before you have even taken the shot and then takes several more, analyzes and combines them all and gives you the best shot within a second. Thats superior IQ and a camera can not even come close to matching that tech.

I get the distinct impression that you are missing the point about the purpose of a camera instrument that is used by a professional. What you see as an advantage in the performance and output of the Apple phone would never be accepted by a pro in a scenario where every scene element is expected to be registered as the camera sees it (in a manner of speaking). The blown highlights in the image that correspond to the area of the image brightly lit by sunlight are blown because of the difference between proper exposure for indoor scene elements versus those out in the sunshine. If you want to correctly expose for both, you have to illuminate the indoor scene elements to match the light intensity out of doors. The pro does not second-guess this, or expect camera software to cook up some sort of HDR miracle based on AI. You don't rely on your camera to do that for you. Instead, you set up the elements of your photograph to obtain the result you want.

Right. So what you've just said is that you need to add a fill flash to those indoor scenes for a proper photo on a DSLR. Thats more time, more money, more work and an additional accessory to have to carry around. The iPhone doesn't need to use its flash, it can properly expose that scene without an issue. The smart HDR software is that good. This is one area the iPhone is superior to a DSLR/mirrorless camera.

The capability to make an image that does not accurately reflect true scene dynamics may be a clever trick, but it is not a characteristic that will ever be accepted by a pro photographer.  In making an image, you want the camera to record the scene that you have specified, nothing more, nothing less.  And, no kidding, you often need lighting equipment to get the result you desire.

Lee Jay Forum Pro • Posts: 55,260
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

24IS wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

My definition of IQ is reading a scene and delivering a quality photo and thats where the iPhone has the advantage. Things like Smart HDR, Deep Fusion and Night Mode. We have all sat there with a DSLR or mirrorless fussing with our settings in a heavily backlit scene like the window shots in that video. The iPhone nails it with no fussing, point and shoot, thats superior IQ. The shot with the guy in front of the tree came out better on the iPhone too. While the camera is just shooing one image, the iPhone has already taken several images before you have even taken the shot and then takes several more, analyzes and combines them all and gives you the best shot within a second. Thats superior IQ and a camera can not even come close to matching that tech.

I get the distinct impression that you are missing the point about the purpose of a camera instrument that is used by a professional. What you see as an advantage in the performance and output of the Apple phone would never be accepted by a pro in a scenario where every scene element is expected to be registered as the camera sees it (in a manner of speaking). The blown highlights in the image that correspond to the area of the image brightly lit by sunlight are blown because of the difference between proper exposure for indoor scene elements versus those out in the sunshine. If you want to correctly expose for both, you have to illuminate the indoor scene elements to match the light intensity out of doors. The pro does not second-guess this, or expect camera software to cook up some sort of HDR miracle based on AI. You don't rely on your camera to do that for you. Instead, you set up the elements of your photograph to obtain the result you want.

Right. So what you've just said is that you need to add a fill flash to those indoor scenes for a proper photo on a DSLR.

No, just that that is a preferable way to do it.

My SLR has HDR built in and so does my processing software.  I use it once in a great while.

Thats more time, more money, more work and an additional accessory to have to carry around.

Again, you're arguing for convenience, not quality.

The iPhone doesn't need to use its flash, it can properly expose that scene without an issue.

No, it can't.

The smart HDR software is that good.

Maybe to you.

This is one area the iPhone is superior to a DSLR/mirrorless camera.

And yet almost all of them have the same feature, it's just that those of us who care about photography don't let the camera decide for us whether or not it gets used.

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Lee Jay

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OP Dexter75 Senior Member • Posts: 2,701
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Lee Jay wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

Right. So what you've just said is that you need to add a fill flash to those indoor scenes for a proper photo on a DSLR.

No, just that that is a preferable way to do it.

My SLR has HDR built in and so does my processing software. I use it once in a great while.

Thats more time, more money, more work and an additional accessory to have to carry around.

Again, you're arguing for convenience, not quality.

The iPhone doesn't need to use its flash, it can properly expose that scene without an issue.

No, it can't.

The smart HDR software is that good.

Maybe to you.

This is one area the iPhone is superior to a DSLR/mirrorless camera.

And yet almost all of them have the same feature, it's just that those of us who care about photography don't let the camera decide for us whether or not it gets used.

Great. Can you please recreate a scene similar to that, take the shot with your SLR and post the results here? The 1DXii cant do it, but you're old SLR can, thats awesome. You dont own an iPhone 11 Pro, nor have you tested one, so you should probably stop making absolute statements on what it can and cant do because they aren't based on anything other than your opinions and assumptions.

Lee Jay Forum Pro • Posts: 55,260
Re: iPhone 11 Pro vs 1DXii

Dexter75 wrote:

Lee Jay wrote:

Dexter75 wrote:

Right. So what you've just said is that you need to add a fill flash to those indoor scenes for a proper photo on a DSLR.

No, just that that is a preferable way to do it.

My SLR has HDR built in and so does my processing software. I use it once in a great while.

Thats more time, more money, more work and an additional accessory to have to carry around.

Again, you're arguing for convenience, not quality.

The iPhone doesn't need to use its flash, it can properly expose that scene without an issue.

No, it can't.

The smart HDR software is that good.

Maybe to you.

This is one area the iPhone is superior to a DSLR/mirrorless camera.

And yet almost all of them have the same feature, it's just that those of us who care about photography don't let the camera decide for us whether or not it gets used.

Great. Can you please recreate a scene similar to that, take the shot with your SLR and post the results here?

Why? it's something I did in the late 90s with a Nikon CP950. It's not that hard. It's a parlor trick. It's useful once in a great while.

Here's from the CP950. Top-right is the final image.

The 1DXii cant do it

Of course it can.

I can't believe you said that.

, but you're old SLR can, thats awesome. You dont own an iPhone 11 Pro, nor have you tested one, so you should probably stop making absolute statements on what it can and cant do because they aren't based on anything other than your opinions and assumptions.

They aren't assumptions. Can it shoot moving subjects at 1,000mm equivalent? Can it shoot with 100mm of aperture? Can it use a flash to freeze a high-speed subject? No, no and no.

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Lee Jay

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