What memory card for the Canon M6 Mk II?

Started Oct 8, 2019 | Discussions
nnowak Veteran Member • Posts: 7,387
Re: Transcend 700S or Sony Tough are recommended

Alexsfo wrote:

nnowak wrote:

Alexsfo wrote:

R2D2 wrote:

Alexsfo wrote:

Not seeing any difference using Sony UHS-II (150mb max write) vs UHS-I San Disk Pro 90mb max write). Burst speed and buffer clearing seem very similar.

Thanks for this.

I just tested my own 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-I (95 MB/s read, 90 MB/s write), and got a 31 shot burst (26.2 MB RAW files), and total duration from first shutter press to buffer-cleared was ~13 seconds.

My brand new 64 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write), also got a 31 shot burst (26.2 MB RAW files), and total duration from first shutter press to buffer-cleared was ~9.8 seconds.

My almost 4 year old 32 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write), posted identical results to the new Transcend 64 GB card.

With the Transcend cards this results in a write speed of appx 83 MB/s.

With the Sandisk card this results in a write speed of appx 63 MB/s.

Earlier tests with fewer (but significantly larger files) indicated a much higher write speed of ~140 MB/s.

Preliminary of course.

R2

I’m trying to figure if there is any benefit in spending 3-4x as much for high speed UHS-II card vs trusty ultra cheap Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-I? Certainly, there is zero benefit for 4k video (120mbps doesn’t even require anywhere close to 60mb/s). Are you testing the raw burst also?

I don't believe RAW burst mode would be affected by card write speeds. The burst is stored as a single file which would suggest that everything needs to fit into the buffer before it would be written to the card

but it may affect buffer clearing speed

True, but the effects would be the same as clearing the buffer of multiple RAW files.

OP R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,768
Re: What memory card for the Canon M6 Mk II?
3

Just ordered a 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II (300r/260w).  I’ve always liked the Extreme Pros, and have never had an issue with one.

So I’ll be able to compare to the two Transcends. I don’t really expect any changes tho.

R2

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OP R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,768
Re: 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II test results
7

64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) test results.

Hi All. In my informal testing, timings with this card are the same as with the previous Transcend (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) UHS-II cards that I tested:

31 image burst (26.1 MB files) @14 fps before buffer-full slowdown. Total elapsed time from first shot until buffer clear was 10 seconds.

As a comparison, my 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro  UHS-I (95 MB/s read, 90 MB/s write) had the same size burst, but elapsed time until buffer clear was 13 seconds.

This is a significant, but not a huge difference between the two technologies (in this particular camera - Canon M6 Mk II). Whether or not this difference in performance (and in cost too) is important to you is your call of course.

Myself, I was out shooting backyard birds yesterday and was often pushing the buffer to the limit (@14 fps), so I did appreciate every last bit of performance I was getting. I do think the 7 fps option will be preferred when a longer duration burst is important Instead of max fps). But 14 fps can certainly be useful at times!

M6 Mk II with 400 5.6L. 1/2000 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 800. Click on "original size"

Happy snapping!

R2

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Alexsfo Senior Member • Posts: 2,357
Re: 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II test results

R2D2 wrote:

64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) test results.

Hi All. In my informal testing, timings with this card are the same as with the previous Transcend (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) UHS-II cards that I tested:

31 image burst (26.1 MB files) @14 fps before buffer-full slowdown. Total elapsed time from first shot until buffer clear was 10 seconds.

As a comparison, my 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-I (95 MB/s read, 90 MB/s write) had the same size burst, but elapsed time until buffer clear was 13 seconds.

This is a significant, but not a huge difference between the two technologies (in this particular camera - Canon M6 Mk II). Whether or not this difference in performance (and in cost too) is important to you is your call of course.

Myself, I was out shooting backyard birds yesterday and was often pushing the buffer to the limit (@14 fps), so I did appreciate every last bit of performance I was getting. I do think the 7 fps option will be preferred when a longer duration burst is important Instead of max fps). But 14 fps can certainly be useful at times!

M6 Mk II with 400 5.6L. 1/2000 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 800. Click on "original size"

Happy snapping!

R2

the difference seems negligible. I’ll stick with my UHS-1 Sandisk extreme pro cards for now at 1/5 of the cost.

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MyM6II
MyM6II Senior Member • Posts: 1,722
Re: 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II test results

Alexsfo wrote:

R2D2 wrote:

64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) test results.

Hi All. In my informal testing, timings with this card are the same as with the previous Transcend (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) UHS-II cards that I tested:

31 image burst (26.1 MB files) @14 fps before buffer-full slowdown. Total elapsed time from first shot until buffer clear was 10 seconds.

As a comparison, my 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-I (95 MB/s read, 90 MB/s write) had the same size burst, but elapsed time until buffer clear was 13 seconds.

This is a significant, but not a huge difference between the two technologies (in this particular camera - Canon M6 Mk II). Whether or not this difference in performance (and in cost too) is important to you is your call of course.

Myself, I was out shooting backyard birds yesterday and was often pushing the buffer to the limit (@14 fps), so I did appreciate every last bit of performance I was getting. I do think the 7 fps option will be preferred when a longer duration burst is important Instead of max fps). But 14 fps can certainly be useful at times!

M6 Mk II with 400 5.6L. 1/2000 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 800. Click on "original size"

Happy snapping!

R2

the difference seems negligible. I’ll stick with my UHS-1 Sandisk extreme pro cards for now at 1/5 of the cost.

Same here. I will maybe buy a UHS-II later, when cheaper. They are not worth the premium (for me) right now.

Many thanks to R2 for the testing. 👍

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nnowak Veteran Member • Posts: 7,387
Standardize testing

There are a whole host of variables that you need to take out of the equation if you want to get reliable data for card write speeds.

  1. Go to the custom functions and set your camera to release shutter without lens attached
  2. Set the camera to manual focus
  3. Set the shutter speed to 1/1000 and ISO to 100
  4. Turn off all lens corrections (peripheral illumination correction, DLO, etc)
  5. Set the burst mode to the highest possible
  6. Take off your lens and install the body cap
  7. Simultaneously start a stopwatch and hold down the shutter button
  8. Continue holding the shutter button for exactly 1 minute and then release the shutter button.
  9. Stop the stopwatch when the buffer finishes clearing
  10. Repeat the test for RAW, RAW+JPEG, JPEG, etc.

First and foremost, this method is repeatable by anyone with any camera with any memory card at any time of day anywhere in the world.  Also, this method eliminates as many processing demands as possible that may slow the camera.  Most of the testing being conducted so far stops shooting the instant the buffer is full. This is the moment that cameramemoryspeed.com STARTS their testing. This suggested test procedure is very similar to that used by cameramemoryspeed.com, but should be easier to reproduce by virtually anyone.

This procedure will give your several useful bits of data:

  1. Total number of frames captured in one minute
  2. Buffer clearing time
  3. The actual card write speed = total size in MB of all frames captured / (60seconds + buffer clearing time in seconds)

With RAW files at 14fps, you are creating a massive amount of data and will quickly flood the buffer, regardless of card speed.  What matters with burst shooting is how soon you can fire another burst.  By doing this extended test above, you will have a better idea how many total shots you will be able to capture over a period of time.  Three seconds of buffer clearing time may free up enough space for 15 more images with one card, but only 10 more with another.  Over a one minute period, that could add up to a very significant difference of 180 images versus 120 images.

Alastair Norcross Veteran Member • Posts: 7,890
Re: 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II test results

R2D2 wrote:

64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) test results.

Hi All. In my informal testing, timings with this card are the same as with the previous Transcend (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) UHS-II cards that I tested:

31 image burst (26.1 MB files) @14 fps before buffer-full slowdown. Total elapsed time from first shot until buffer clear was 10 seconds.

As a comparison, my 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-I (95 MB/s read, 90 MB/s write) had the same size burst, but elapsed time until buffer clear was 13 seconds.

This is a significant, but not a huge difference between the two technologies (in this particular camera - Canon M6 Mk II). Whether or not this difference in performance (and in cost too) is important to you is your call of course.

Myself, I was out shooting backyard birds yesterday and was often pushing the buffer to the limit (@14 fps), so I did appreciate every last bit of performance I was getting. I do think the 7 fps option will be preferred when a longer duration burst is important Instead of max fps). But 14 fps can certainly be useful at times!

M6 Mk II with 400 5.6L. 1/2000 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 800. Click on "original size"

Happy snapping!

R2

Great shot! What focus mode were you in?

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OP R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,768
Re: 64 GB Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-II test results

Alastair Norcross wrote:

R2D2 wrote:

Great shot! What focus mode were you in?

Thanks Alastair!

I've indeed found that the Servo AF mode of the M6ii is substantially improved over my M5.  In addition I used the Spot AF function, with Back Button Focus (Continuous AF disabled).

The viewfinder was working very well, and I used Touch and Drag to move my AF point around.  The birds were very active!  I'd shoot a burst (filling the buffer), and then fire off some single frames, then pause for a couple of seconds, then fire off as many more as I could.  Lather, rinse, repeat.  Then, bam, the Waxwings were gone.

I was surprised at how well the M6ii handled with the big lens.  That grip (and the new AF-On button) made for an excellent shooting experience.

R2

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OP R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,768
Re: Update. Returned my new Transcend card
1

Hi all.

I had to return my new 64 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) card as I was getting intermittent card read errors from my M6ii upon startup. It would be fine after power-cycling the camera, and I lost no images, but it was a pain (and worrisome).

I don't know if it was just a bad copy (folks chip in here with your experiences). Oddly enough I have an almost 4 year old 32 GB version of this card which works flawlessly.

And my 64 GB Sandisk UHS-II Extreme Pro (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) has been perfect too.  I'll be using this one until I get a 128 GB version of it.

Wish you the best luck with your cards!

R2

Note: the Transcend and the Sandisk cards tested identically in my speed tests (burst to buffer full -> buffer clear).

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Alastair Norcross Veteran Member • Posts: 7,890
Re: Update. Returned my new Transcend card

R2D2 wrote:

Hi all.

I had to return my new 64 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) card as I was getting intermittent card read errors from my M6ii upon startup. It would be fine after power-cycling the camera, and I lost no images, but it was a pain (and worrisome).

I don't know if it was just a bad copy (folks chip in here with your experiences). Oddly enough I have an almost 4 year old 32 GB version of this card which works flawlessly.

And my 64 GB Sandisk UHS-II Extreme Pro (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) has been perfect too. I'll be using this one until I get a 128 GB version of it.

Wish you the best luck with your cards!

R2

Note: the Transcend and the Sandisk cards tested identically in my speed tests (burst to buffer full -> buffer clear).

That is worrying. I also had a worrying experience with my new Transcend UHS-II card. I formatted it in the M6II and took a few shots with the 11-22. Then I turned off the camera and mounted a different lens (the 70-200 F2.8L II with 2X extender). When I turned the camera on again, I got a message saying the camera couldn't read the card. I turned it off and on again, but got the same message. So I formatted it in the camera (low level format) again, losing my earlier shots (no big deal, they were just test shots). It then worked fine. It wasn't until after I'd shot a bunch that I noticed that the shots remaining were showing up as far fewer than they should have been. When I got home and put the card in the computer, it said it had 8gb, not 64. So, I formatted it again in camera (both low-level and regular this time), and finally got it to show up as 64gb (actually a bit less, but close enough). I've taken a few shots since then, and turned the camera off and on again a few times, and had no problems. But, after reading your experience, I'm worried. I still have plenty of time to return it. My old Sandisk (95MB/S) works fine, and I could get the Sandisk UHS-II to replace this Transcend. It's more expensive, but I've never had any problems with Sandisk.

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Alastair Norcross Veteran Member • Posts: 7,890
I've also had to return my Transcend

Alastair Norcross wrote:

R2D2 wrote:

Hi all.

I had to return my new 64 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) card as I was getting intermittent card read errors from my M6ii upon startup. It would be fine after power-cycling the camera, and I lost no images, but it was a pain (and worrisome).

I don't know if it was just a bad copy (folks chip in here with your experiences). Oddly enough I have an almost 4 year old 32 GB version of this card which works flawlessly.

And my 64 GB Sandisk UHS-II Extreme Pro (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) has been perfect too. I'll be using this one until I get a 128 GB version of it.

Wish you the best luck with your cards!

R2

Note: the Transcend and the Sandisk cards tested identically in my speed tests (burst to buffer full -> buffer clear).

That is worrying. I also had a worrying experience with my new Transcend UHS-II card. I formatted it in the M6II and took a few shots with the 11-22. Then I turned off the camera and mounted a different lens (the 70-200 F2.8L II with 2X extender). When I turned the camera on again, I got a message saying the camera couldn't read the card. I turned it off and on again, but got the same message. So I formatted it in the camera (low level format) again, losing my earlier shots (no big deal, they were just test shots). It then worked fine. It wasn't until after I'd shot a bunch that I noticed that the shots remaining were showing up as far fewer than they should have been. When I got home and put the card in the computer, it said it had 8gb, not 64. So, I formatted it again in camera (both low-level and regular this time), and finally got it to show up as 64gb (actually a bit less, but close enough). I've taken a few shots since then, and turned the camera off and on again a few times, and had no problems. But, after reading your experience, I'm worried. I still have plenty of time to return it. My old Sandisk (95MB/S) works fine, and I could get the Sandisk UHS-II to replace this Transcend. It's more expensive, but I've never had any problems with Sandisk.

Since the previous post, I used the card again. I got the card unreadable error three times. Each time, it was cured by turning the camera off and on again. But this isn't something I want to have to do constantly, just to access the card. So, I've processed a return with Amazon, and ordered the more expensive, but I hope more reliable, Sandisk UHS-II.

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Canochrome Regular Member • Posts: 351
Re: I've also had to return my Transcend

Alastair Norcross wrote:

Since the previous post, I used the card again. I got the card unreadable error three times. Each time, it was cured by turning the camera off and on again. But this isn't something I want to have to do constantly, just to access the card. So, I've processed a return with Amazon, and ordered the more expensive, but I hope more reliable, Sandisk UHS-II.

I don't think I've had any experience with Transcend cards, but I have never had issues with Sandisk. That's not to say that there could never be a problem with a Sandisk card, but just that my experience has been good.

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Ali Senior Member • Posts: 1,637
Tried Lexar "1000x" UHS-II on the M6II

I bought a Lexar 128GB "Professional 1000x" UHS-II card - so far so good. Labelled as 150MB/s. Was $28. Also tried three older cards.

Settings were full RAW, large fine JPEG, at 1/1250sec.

Lexar UHS-II: 23 shot burst, 14/sec, which I believe is the max.

SanDisk 128GB, "class 10", "95MB/s": 21 shot burst, 12/sec.

Transcend 64GB card (labelled "class 10"): 21 shot burst, 11/sec.

Older PNY 16GB card (also labelled "class 10," "20MB/s"): 21 shot burst, 9/sec. With this card subsequent photos seemed to take 5 sec each.

So seems like unless you are really out for the maximum performance most older "class 10" cards give pretty good performance.

For kicks, on the M6, the Lexar gave 17 shot burst, 9/sec, while the SanDisk gave 16 shot burst, 6-9/sec.

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kingfoto New Member • Posts: 1
Re: I've also had to return my Transcend

Alastair Norcross wrote:

Alastair Norcross wrote:

R2D2 wrote:

Hi all.

I had to return my new 64 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) card as I was getting intermittent card read errors from my M6ii upon startup. It would be fine after power-cycling the camera, and I lost no images, but it was a pain (and worrisome).

I don't know if it was just a bad copy (folks chip in here with your experiences). Oddly enough I have an almost 4 year old 32 GB version of this card which works flawlessly.

And my 64 GB Sandisk UHS-II Extreme Pro (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) has been perfect too. I'll be using this one until I get a 128 GB version of it.

Wish you the best luck with your cards!

R2

Note: the Transcend and the Sandisk cards tested identically in my speed tests (burst to buffer full -> buffer clear).

That is worrying. I also had a worrying experience with my new Transcend UHS-II card. I formatted it in the M6II and took a few shots with the 11-22. Then I turned off the camera and mounted a different lens (the 70-200 F2.8L II with 2X extender). When I turned the camera on again, I got a message saying the camera couldn't read the card. I turned it off and on again, but got the same message. So I formatted it in the camera (low level format) again, losing my earlier shots (no big deal, they were just test shots). It then worked fine. It wasn't until after I'd shot a bunch that I noticed that the shots remaining were showing up as far fewer than they should have been. When I got home and put the card in the computer, it said it had 8gb, not 64. So, I formatted it again in camera (both low-level and regular this time), and finally got it to show up as 64gb (actually a bit less, but close enough). I've taken a few shots since then, and turned the camera off and on again a few times, and had no problems. But, after reading your experience, I'm worried. I still have plenty of time to return it. My old Sandisk (95MB/S) works fine, and I could get the Sandisk UHS-II to replace this Transcend. It's more expensive, but I've never had any problems with Sandisk.

Since the previous post, I used the card again. I got the card unreadable error three times. Each time, it was cured by turning the camera off and on again. But this isn't something I want to have to do constantly, just to access the card. So, I've processed a return with Amazon, and ordered the more expensive, but I hope more reliable, Sandisk UHS-II.

I'm having this issue as well, not with Transcend cards per say. I bought a ProGrade Digital SDXC UHS-II V90 Memory Card (128GB) and the M6 Mark ii is not formatting it correctly, only formatting to 8GB as opposed to the 128GB the card is sized at. It's also giving the error where it can't read the card to which multiple power cycles may or may not bring it back to be read by the camera. I had to revert to an older 64GB Sony UHS-I card to get me through the day, with a few Sandisk 32GB and 16GB card on standby just in case.

On a whim I put the card in my 80D and it formatted just fine without any issue. I have not tested since the format, but, I'll give it a go sometime today. It's just hard to go away from an EVF for motor sports photography now after the last two days of use.

Blancpain GT LVMS 2019

I don't think it's a card issue but more of a camera issue that hopefully can be fixed with a firmware upgrade. Has anyone gotten hold of Canon with similar issues?

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Alastair Norcross Veteran Member • Posts: 7,890
Re: I've also had to return my Transcend

kingfoto wrote:

Alastair Norcross wrote:

Alastair Norcross wrote:

R2D2 wrote:

Hi all.

I had to return my new 64 GB Transcend UHS-II (285 MB/s read, 180 MB/s write) card as I was getting intermittent card read errors from my M6ii upon startup. It would be fine after power-cycling the camera, and I lost no images, but it was a pain (and worrisome).

I don't know if it was just a bad copy (folks chip in here with your experiences). Oddly enough I have an almost 4 year old 32 GB version of this card which works flawlessly.

And my 64 GB Sandisk UHS-II Extreme Pro (300 MB/s read, 260 MB/s write) has been perfect too. I'll be using this one until I get a 128 GB version of it.

Wish you the best luck with your cards!

R2

Note: the Transcend and the Sandisk cards tested identically in my speed tests (burst to buffer full -> buffer clear).

That is worrying. I also had a worrying experience with my new Transcend UHS-II card. I formatted it in the M6II and took a few shots with the 11-22. Then I turned off the camera and mounted a different lens (the 70-200 F2.8L II with 2X extender). When I turned the camera on again, I got a message saying the camera couldn't read the card. I turned it off and on again, but got the same message. So I formatted it in the camera (low level format) again, losing my earlier shots (no big deal, they were just test shots). It then worked fine. It wasn't until after I'd shot a bunch that I noticed that the shots remaining were showing up as far fewer than they should have been. When I got home and put the card in the computer, it said it had 8gb, not 64. So, I formatted it again in camera (both low-level and regular this time), and finally got it to show up as 64gb (actually a bit less, but close enough). I've taken a few shots since then, and turned the camera off and on again a few times, and had no problems. But, after reading your experience, I'm worried. I still have plenty of time to return it. My old Sandisk (95MB/S) works fine, and I could get the Sandisk UHS-II to replace this Transcend. It's more expensive, but I've never had any problems with Sandisk.

Since the previous post, I used the card again. I got the card unreadable error three times. Each time, it was cured by turning the camera off and on again. But this isn't something I want to have to do constantly, just to access the card. So, I've processed a return with Amazon, and ordered the more expensive, but I hope more reliable, Sandisk UHS-II.

I'm having this issue as well, not with Transcend cards per say. I bought a ProGrade Digital SDXC UHS-II V90 Memory Card (128GB) and the M6 Mark ii is not formatting it correctly, only formatting to 8GB as opposed to the 128GB the card is sized at. It's also giving the error where it can't read the card to which multiple power cycles may or may not bring it back to be read by the camera. I had to revert to an older 64GB Sony UHS-I card to get me through the day, with a few Sandisk 32GB and 16GB card on standby just in case.

On a whim I put the card in my 80D and it formatted just fine without any issue. I have not tested since the format, but, I'll give it a go sometime today. It's just hard to go away from an EVF for motor sports photography now after the last two days of use.

Blancpain GT LVMS 2019

I don't think it's a card issue but more of a camera issue that hopefully can be fixed with a firmware upgrade. Has anyone gotten hold of Canon with similar issues?

You're probably right. I haven't had the issue with my new Sandisk UHS-II card (yet) though. With the Transcend, I was able to format it for 64GB in the M6II, but that was after it initially formatted for only 8GB. I have no idea why it did 8 initially, and then went to 64 the next time I reformatted it. If Canon does issue a firmware fix, I would be happy to buy Transcend again, but, for now, I'm sticking with Sandisk.

Nice shot, by the way. It's taking me a bit of time to get used to the fact that the M6II is actually a great action camera, as well as everything else. With my M6, I was always reluctant to use it for fast action, and relied on the 7DII for that. Now, the only time I think I'll need the 7DII is when the weather is bad, or I need 6000 plus shots (with the battery grip on the 7DII I can shoot well over 6000 shots).

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OP R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,768
Re: I've also had to return my Transcend

Alastair Norcross wrote:

I haven't had the issue with my new Sandisk UHS-II card (yet) though. With the Transcend, I was able to format it for 64GB in the M6II, but that was after it initially formatted for only 8GB. I have no idea why it did 8 initially, and then went to 64 the next time I reformatted it. If Canon does issue a firmware fix, I would be happy to buy Transcend again, but, for now, I'm sticking with Sandisk.

+1

Nice shot, by the way. It's taking me a bit of time to get used to the fact that the M6II is actually a great action camera, as well as everything else. With my M6, I was always reluctant to use it for fast action, and relied on the 7DII for that. Now, the only time I think I'll need the 7DII is when the weather is bad, or I need 6000 plus shots (with the battery grip on the 7DII I can shoot well over 6000 shots).

+2 I used to get my 70D out whenever I wanted to shoot birds, but now the 70D will (likely) only be used for BIFs!  Really digging this M6ii!!

R2

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F3RSH Forum Member • Posts: 51
Re: Standardize testing

nnowak wrote:

There are a whole host of variables that you need to take out of the equation if you want to get reliable data for card write speeds.

  1. Go to the custom functions and set your camera to release shutter without lens attached
  2. Set the camera to manual focus
  3. Set the shutter speed to 1/1000 and ISO to 100
  4. Turn off all lens corrections (peripheral illumination correction, DLO, etc)
  5. Set the burst mode to the highest possible
  6. Take off your lens and install the body cap
  7. Simultaneously start a stopwatch and hold down the shutter button
  8. Continue holding the shutter button for exactly 1 minute and then release the shutter button.
  9. Stop the stopwatch when the buffer finishes clearing
  10. Repeat the test for RAW, RAW+JPEG, JPEG, etc.

First and foremost, this method is repeatable by anyone with any camera with any memory card at any time of day anywhere in the world. Also, this method eliminates as many processing demands as possible that may slow the camera. Most of the testing being conducted so far stops shooting the instant the buffer is full. This is the moment that cameramemoryspeed.com STARTS their testing. This suggested test procedure is very similar to that used by cameramemoryspeed.com, but should be easier to reproduce by virtually anyone.

This procedure will give your several useful bits of data:

  1. Total number of frames captured in one minute
  2. Buffer clearing time
  3. The actual card write speed = total size in MB of all frames captured / (60seconds + buffer clearing time in seconds)

With RAW files at 14fps, you are creating a massive amount of data and will quickly flood the buffer, regardless of card speed. What matters with burst shooting is how soon you can fire another burst. By doing this extended test above, you will have a better idea how many total shots you will be able to capture over a period of time. Three seconds of buffer clearing time may free up enough space for 15 more images with one card, but only 10 more with another. Over a one minute period, that could add up to a very significant difference of 180 images versus 120 images.

Thanks very much for this. I tested my 90D according to your instructions. Low format card, set to 1000/s iso 100 in Manual with body cap on. Shoot in RAW for 1 minute and time the complete writing to card.

1. 64Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-I gave 246 19.8Mb files, 10 s clearance, 4.87Gb = 70 Mb/s
2. 32Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-II gave 259 19.7Mb files, 10 s clearance, 5.10Gb = 73Mb/s

So, the camera is throttling the writing to card.

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OP R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,768
Re: Standardize testing
1

F3RSH wrote:

nnowak wrote:

There are a whole host of variables that you need to take out of the equation if you want to get reliable data for card write speeds.

  1. Go to the custom functions and set your camera to release shutter without lens attached
  2. Set the camera to manual focus
  3. Set the shutter speed to 1/1000 and ISO to 100
  4. Turn off all lens corrections (peripheral illumination correction, DLO, etc)
  5. Set the burst mode to the highest possible
  6. Take off your lens and install the body cap
  7. Simultaneously start a stopwatch and hold down the shutter button
  8. Continue holding the shutter button for exactly 1 minute and then release the shutter button.
  9. Stop the stopwatch when the buffer finishes clearing
  10. Repeat the test for RAW, RAW+JPEG, JPEG, etc.

First and foremost, this method is repeatable by anyone with any camera with any memory card at any time of day anywhere in the world. Also, this method eliminates as many processing demands as possible that may slow the camera. Most of the testing being conducted so far stops shooting the instant the buffer is full. This is the moment that cameramemoryspeed.com STARTS their testing. This suggested test procedure is very similar to that used by cameramemoryspeed.com, but should be easier to reproduce by virtually anyone.

This procedure will give your several useful bits of data:

  1. Total number of frames captured in one minute
  2. Buffer clearing time
  3. The actual card write speed = total size in MB of all frames captured / (60seconds + buffer clearing time in seconds)

With RAW files at 14fps, you are creating a massive amount of data and will quickly flood the buffer, regardless of card speed. What matters with burst shooting is how soon you can fire another burst. By doing this extended test above, you will have a better idea how many total shots you will be able to capture over a period of time. Three seconds of buffer clearing time may free up enough space for 15 more images with one card, but only 10 more with another. Over a one minute period, that could add up to a very significant difference of 180 images versus 120 images.

Thanks very much for this. I tested my 90D according to your instructions. Low format card, set to 1000/s iso 100 in Manual with body cap on. Shoot in RAW for 1 minute and time the complete writing to card.

1. 64Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-I gave 246 19.8Mb files, 10 s clearance, 4.87Gb = 70 Mb/s
2. 32Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-II gave 259 19.7Mb files, 10 s clearance, 5.10Gb = 73Mb/s

So, the camera is throttling the writing to card.

Incorrect conclusion (due to the testing methodology). The processing of the individual frames is still what slows the speed (with longer bursts), not any intentional throttling of the write speed.

If you test for a shorter duration you will get a much more accurate write speed.

You can certainly test for the full minute duration if you wish (if you're ever going to be shooting 60-second bursts). But the data you get will only apply to that particular shooting method (60-second "bursts").

R2

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nnowak Veteran Member • Posts: 7,387
Re: Standardize testing
2

R2D2 wrote:

F3RSH wrote:

nnowak wrote:

There are a whole host of variables that you need to take out of the equation if you want to get reliable data for card write speeds.

  1. Go to the custom functions and set your camera to release shutter without lens attached
  2. Set the camera to manual focus
  3. Set the shutter speed to 1/1000 and ISO to 100
  4. Turn off all lens corrections (peripheral illumination correction, DLO, etc)
  5. Set the burst mode to the highest possible
  6. Take off your lens and install the body cap
  7. Simultaneously start a stopwatch and hold down the shutter button
  8. Continue holding the shutter button for exactly 1 minute and then release the shutter button.
  9. Stop the stopwatch when the buffer finishes clearing
  10. Repeat the test for RAW, RAW+JPEG, JPEG, etc.

First and foremost, this method is repeatable by anyone with any camera with any memory card at any time of day anywhere in the world. Also, this method eliminates as many processing demands as possible that may slow the camera. Most of the testing being conducted so far stops shooting the instant the buffer is full. This is the moment that cameramemoryspeed.com STARTS their testing. This suggested test procedure is very similar to that used by cameramemoryspeed.com, but should be easier to reproduce by virtually anyone.

This procedure will give your several useful bits of data:

  1. Total number of frames captured in one minute
  2. Buffer clearing time
  3. The actual card write speed = total size in MB of all frames captured / (60seconds + buffer clearing time in seconds)

With RAW files at 14fps, you are creating a massive amount of data and will quickly flood the buffer, regardless of card speed. What matters with burst shooting is how soon you can fire another burst. By doing this extended test above, you will have a better idea how many total shots you will be able to capture over a period of time. Three seconds of buffer clearing time may free up enough space for 15 more images with one card, but only 10 more with another. Over a one minute period, that could add up to a very significant difference of 180 images versus 120 images.

Thanks very much for this. I tested my 90D according to your instructions. Low format card, set to 1000/s iso 100 in Manual with body cap on. Shoot in RAW for 1 minute and time the complete writing to card.

1. 64Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-I gave 246 19.8Mb files, 10 s clearance, 4.87Gb = 70 Mb/s
2. 32Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-II gave 259 19.7Mb files, 10 s clearance, 5.10Gb = 73Mb/s

So, the camera is throttling the writing to card.

Incorrect conclusion (due to the testing methodology). The processing of the individual frames is what slows the speed (with longer bursts), not any intentional throttling of the write speed.

If you test for a shorter duration you will get a much more accurate write speed.

No, it will not be more accurate. You will never be able to determine write speed by only shooting a single, buffer full, burst. All you are really testing is buffer size and burst rate. With the testing you have been doing, roughly 25% of your test time was just filling the buffer. The moment the buffer filled, you stopped firing the shutter and let the camera flush the buffer with no other processing demands. Just changing your burst rate would dramatically change your results.  Why do you think so many people doing your suggested short test method have been getting such wildly different results?

You can certainly test for the full minute if you wish (if you're going to be shooting 60-second bursts fairly often). But the data you get will only apply to that particular testing method (60-second "bursts").

The reason we buy fast cards is so we can avoid buffer full conditions.  The only way to determine the true card write speed is by maintaining a saturated buffer for an extended period of time.  Go read how the well respected www.cameramemoryspeed.com performs their testing. My proposed method is basically the same, but I have changed a few details so that anyone in the world can repliate the testing with no special skills or additional hardware and all results would be directly comparable.

R2

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F3RSH Forum Member • Posts: 51
Re: Standardize testing

R2D2 wrote:

F3RSH wrote:

nnowak wrote:

There are a whole host of variables that you need to take out of the equation if you want to get reliable data for card write speeds.

  1. Go to the custom functions and set your camera to release shutter without lens attached
  2. Set the camera to manual focus
  3. Set the shutter speed to 1/1000 and ISO to 100
  4. Turn off all lens corrections (peripheral illumination correction, DLO, etc)
  5. Set the burst mode to the highest possible
  6. Take off your lens and install the body cap
  7. Simultaneously start a stopwatch and hold down the shutter button
  8. Continue holding the shutter button for exactly 1 minute and then release the shutter button.
  9. Stop the stopwatch when the buffer finishes clearing
  10. Repeat the test for RAW, RAW+JPEG, JPEG, etc.

First and foremost, this method is repeatable by anyone with any camera with any memory card at any time of day anywhere in the world. Also, this method eliminates as many processing demands as possible that may slow the camera. Most of the testing being conducted so far stops shooting the instant the buffer is full. This is the moment that cameramemoryspeed.com STARTS their testing. This suggested test procedure is very similar to that used by cameramemoryspeed.com, but should be easier to reproduce by virtually anyone.

This procedure will give your several useful bits of data:

  1. Total number of frames captured in one minute
  2. Buffer clearing time
  3. The actual card write speed = total size in MB of all frames captured / (60seconds + buffer clearing time in seconds)

With RAW files at 14fps, you are creating a massive amount of data and will quickly flood the buffer, regardless of card speed. What matters with burst shooting is how soon you can fire another burst. By doing this extended test above, you will have a better idea how many total shots you will be able to capture over a period of time. Three seconds of buffer clearing time may free up enough space for 15 more images with one card, but only 10 more with another. Over a one minute period, that could add up to a very significant difference of 180 images versus 120 images.

Thanks very much for this. I tested my 90D according to your instructions. Low format card, set to 1000/s iso 100 in Manual with body cap on. Shoot in RAW for 1 minute and time the complete writing to card.

1. 64Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-I gave 246 19.8Mb files, 10 s clearance, 4.87Gb = 70 Mb/s
2. 32Gb SandDisk Extreme Pro UHS-II gave 259 19.7Mb files, 10 s clearance, 5.10Gb = 73Mb/s

So, the camera is throttling the writing to card.

Incorrect conclusion (due to the testing methodology). The processing of the individual frames is still what slows the speed (with longer bursts), not any intentional throttling of the write speed.

If you test for a shorter duration you will get a much more accurate write speed.

You can certainly test for the full minute duration if you wish (if you're ever going to be shooting 60-second bursts). But the data you get will only apply to that particular shooting method (60-second "bursts").

R2

I had previously done what you suggested. I fired a full burst for both cards, stopped immediately the burst ended and continued timing the busy red light. Both the UHS-I and UHS-II cards filled the burst with about 20 shots in 2 secs and continued for another 13 sec to finish writing to the card. That is, the same result but with less accuracy than the 1 minute shooting procedure - both cards performed very similarly.

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