One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
offtheback
offtheback Senior Member • Posts: 1,012
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?
1

And a bridge camera can get dust on sensor that cannot be removed except by disassembly.

Chizuka
OP Chizuka Contributing Member • Posts: 638
Re: 12-200mm or 1" ZS100

Henry Richardson wrote:

Chizuka wrote:

Henry Richardson wrote:

Chizuka wrote:

Hi, i am faced with a dilemma. I want to travel with only one camera and one lens because I will be walking a lot all day and I am a small woman. I would like the lens to cover a 12-150 range ideally (in mft terms) and I don’t want to buy the Olympus 12-100 PRO because of the cost.

I am looking at the new Olympus 12-200 or the older 14-150 f4.5/5.6 or at a bridge camera with a 1inch sensor. Is there a noticeable difference in IQ between the mft options and a Bridge camera like the Sony Rx10 mk3 or the Lumix FZ 2500 or something similar.

I would be using the Lumix G9 body.

If you want one lens that has 12-150mm (or more) then your only m4/3 choice is the Olympus 12-200mm lens. The G9 + 12-200mm is going to be rather large and heavy and you imply that is a problem. The Olympus 14-150mm is much smaller/lighter and I prefer it for my many travels (I have version II and I) with m4/3 since April 2012. I put it on a PEN-F or E-M10II though and they are much smaller/lighter than the G9. Photos here:

http://www.bakubo.com

As I mentioned to another user, I do have the EM10 MK2 also but I don't really trust it for a vacation abroad. So perhaps the 14-150 or the 14-140 would be the solution for me. It is a hard decision/compromise for me to make because I usually use the Oly 12-40 Pro and the Oly 40-150 Pro but they are together too big and too heavy, and as I said, on this vacation, there will be a lot of walking all day and I just have to have one lens, one body.

I am not sure what you mean about not trusting the E-M10II. Do you mean yours is broken or has some problem? I have used my E-M10II and E-M10 on many trips (see website galleries). And E-M5 on earlier ones. And PEN-F also. My favorite travel bodies though are the E-M10II with the E-M10 as the backup since they are small, light, capable, and use the same batteries.

I have had the EM10 mk2 repaired once and last time I took it on a safari, the pictures were all terrible (contrast horrible for lack of better description) and I had to reset it. Thankfully that worked except for having to redo all my settings.

I used to have an EM5, and it too broke, flashing a message about Aperture needing to be set, when in fact it is set. So the record with Olympus is not too good with my personal experience. So I will probably have the Em10 as a backup (in my suitcase) but not put it in my daybag in order to lighten the load.

I carry 2-3 other lenses also when I travel, an extra m4/3 body, flash, and a small pocket camera (Sony RX100 or Canon S95).

If you can get by with the electronic zoom and generally somewhat slower operation you can get one of the 1" sensor compacts such as the Panasonic ZS100/TZ100/TX1 with Panasonic-Leica 25-250mm lens. It is small and light, but full featured. I bought one for $419 in January and wrote a user review:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/62337549

Canon and Sony make some 1" models also that you can consider.

Everything depends on what you will compromise on. A 1" can do a lot and produce good results (especially if you shoot raw), but when the light gets low then the bigger 4/3 sensor will be handy.

I do shoot RAW. Would not have it any other way. Yes, light is likely to be an issue at times.

Only you can decide which compromises you want to make. You sound like you don't want to make any compromises though. In that case I suggest you take the G9 + 12-40 + 40-150mm so that you won't have to have any doubts.

if i had wanted to do that, i would not have asked this question. It is not an option to carry the 40-150 Pro!!!

Learn mind control techniques so that if you get tired carrying it all while traveling you can ignore the fatigue and weight. Be sure to take an extra body too though because I never take a trip abroad without a backup body. Get at least one fast prime too for low light. The G9 is not any good with a slow zoom in low light. In your case the 17mm f1.2 or 25mm f1.2 would be ideal. I always carry a wider than 12mm zoom too. In your case that would be the 7-14mm f2.8.

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Kent Ekasak
Kent Ekasak Contributing Member • Posts: 602
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

Hi mam,

I think most of zoom bridge camera has dust problem, so I would avoid that.. And the good one is not cheap.. Answer to your need is m4/3 14-140 zoom.. Or,I would suggest otherwise, if you will try to use just one prime, like 17/1.8 or 15/1.7 or 20/1.7.. It's fun to use prime for walk around whole day.. You may get less images than zoom, but all of them will be sharper and more pop..

Scottelly
Scottelly Forum Pro • Posts: 14,031
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

Chizuka wrote:

Hi, i am faced with a dilemma. I want to travel with only one camera and one lens because I will be walking a lot all day and I am a small woman. I would like the lens to cover a 12-150 range ideally (in mft terms) and I don’t want to buy the Olympus 12-100 PRO because of the cost.

I am looking at the new Olympus 12-200 or the older 14-150 f4.5/5.6 or at a bridge camera with a 1inch sensor. Is there a noticeable difference in IQ between the mft options and a Bridge camera like the Sony Rx10 mk3 or the Lumix FZ 2500 or something similar.

I would be using the Lumix G9 body.

To me there is a noticeable difference, but I'm the type of pixel peeper that views massive jpegs on a 50" screen, and then I stick my face up as close as my eyes will focus, which is less than 12" away. That means I may have a sickness, but it helps me make better quality photos . . . I think.

I've used a Panasonic FZ1000. I was surprised how good the image quality was, and I was really surprised how light the camera feels (but the FZ2500 is not as light - you really won't save much weight by carrying the FZ2500 vs the G9 with 12-200 lens). The photos from that Panasonic FZ1000 look good on a 50" 4K screen when viewing the OOC jpegs in full-screen view. The FZ2500 photos will look basically identical (same 20 MP sensor, if I'm not mistaken). Sure, when pixel-peeping at 100% they don't look as good as what I'm used to seeing with my Nikon D810 and my Sigma cameras. Viewing full-screen is about equivalent to viewing a 30" x 40" print on canvas though, which woud be pretty impressive to just about anyone, I'm sure. A much bigger canvas print, like 60" x 80" maybe, would be so big that probably almost nobody would expect any more detail than the FZ1000 has to offer. Do you really need the faster speed and lens interchangeability of the G9? If not, why not at least try the much cheaper and lighter Panasonic?

I come from the 24 MP APS-C world, and I was impressed with the 20 MP photos from the Panasonic (though they were not quite as good as what I get from my Sony A65, of course). A 20 MP micro-four-thirds camera isn't as good as what I'm used to, so for me to be impressed with the results from the little 1" sensor in the FZ1000, well it's something special, if you ask me. I'm thinking that if you're not looking at full-frame cameras, because you're such a hard-core pixel peeper or because you plan to shoot at ISO 1600 a lot, then you'll be quite happy with the Panasonic FZ2500 (or an FZ1000). I'm sure that camera is good for shooting at ISO 100, 200, 400, and even 800. ISO 1600 seems to be a point where full-frame is necessary though. I have problems looking at ISO 1600 shots from my full-frame Nikon D810 though, so maybe I'm not the right person to be talking about high-ISO photography.

You might want to check out this tool:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=panasonic_dmcfz1000&attr13_1=panasonic_dcg9&attr13_2=nikon_d500&attr13_3=sony_a9&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr15_2=jpeg&attr15_3=jpeg&attr16_0=200&attr16_1=200&attr16_2=200&attr16_3=200&attr126_1=1&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.40387601792816114&y=-0.9316821509194931

There you can change the ISO setting, view RAW or JPG, and even select different lighting scenarios, such as this ISO 1600 scene:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=panasonic_dmcfz1000&attr13_1=panasonic_dcg9&attr13_2=nikon_d500&attr13_3=sony_a9&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr15_2=jpeg&attr15_3=jpeg&attr16_0=1600&attr16_1=1600&attr16_2=1600&attr16_3=1600&attr126_1=1&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.8634584686073391&y=-0.2303387693289357

Notice how at ISO 1600 the Panasonic has smoothed out the details so much with noise reduction that a lot of details are missing? You can move the images around to see more of the test scene. Viewing in raw helps to reveal how much noise there really is:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=panasonic_dmcfz1000&attr13_1=panasonic_dcg9&attr13_2=nikon_d500&attr13_3=sony_a9&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr15_2=raw&attr15_3=raw&attr16_0=1600&attr16_1=1600&attr16_2=1600&attr16_3=1600&attr126_1=1&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.8634584686073391&y=-0.2303387693289357

I hope my comment has been helpful. Good luck with your decision.

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HRC2016 Senior Member • Posts: 4,805
Consider bridge or travel camera?
1

Have you asked this question only of m43 users?

Have you considered how important image quality is?

Bridge cameras are pretty good. There are also the Panasonic travel zooms. Sony's new RX100 vii is getting phenomenal reviews but might be outside your budget. You can't beat it for size and image quality.

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OutsideTheMatrix
OutsideTheMatrix Senior Member • Posts: 5,043
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

TwoMetreBill wrote:

Having owned several of each technologies and currently using a OMD EM1, some issues to consider:

  1. bridge cameras are not very durable, expect them to start failing after a couple thousand exposures. There are exceptions of course but they have to cut lots of corners to meet those price points.
  2. bridge cameras have many handling compromises. This probably doesn't matter if you plan to use it in Auto or Program mode.
  3. stabilization is not as good
  4. AF accuracy and speed are inferior

If cost is no object then my recommendation is for the current deal from Olympus of the OMD EM1 with the 12-200 lens. That can be cropped 2X and still match the IQ of the 1" sensor bridge cameras. So 24-800 equivalent.

If cost is a consideration then I'd go for the Panasonic FZ1000, but not the FZ2500. We've owned both and finally dumped the 2500 due to the poor AF and lower quality of the lens. My wife has traveled all over the world world with her FZ1000 with no issues. We'll keep it until it dies, still under 3,000 shots. Very good 4K 30P video too.

The twice as expensive Sony with a 1" sensor and 24-600 equivalent lens gets very good reviews but I'd rent one before buying. Sony has the worst ergonomics (well, second to Leica) that people either hate or find acceptable. Again for shooting in one of the automatic modes, it's probably fine for almost anyone. According to the reviews, it also has the sharpest lens of any bridge camera.

As far as I'm concerned, these are the only bridge cameras worth considering. Now if don't want a true bridge camera (has at least a 20:1 zoom) then (according to the reviews) there are many other very good options. I'd consider the newly released Canon GX5 II.

How durable are inexpensive M43 cameras like the E-PL6? I have one and am trying to figure out what lens to get to give me tight birding shots and images of the planets (saturn's rings, jupiter's bands, etc.) I have a Fuji HS50 with a manual zoom lens that works well but it only goes out to 1000mm equiv and I tried a Sony 1.7x TC (HGD1758) with it and the images are a bit soft. I want to get a longer tele on my E-PL6 but still be as bright as f/5.6 at max.  I already have the 14-42 and 40-150 lenses.

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David5833 Senior Member • Posts: 1,174
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

You want to take just one body and one lens, and mass is important plus you don't want to spend a lot. You already own a G9 and an E-M10ii and a few lenses. You're reluctant to take the E-M10ii based on previous issues, so it makes sense that you would take the superb G9. I understand that you want just one camera, but the E-M10ii is so small and light that I might take it as a backup if I was traveling to remote places...just a thought.

The vast majority of my travel photos are in the 24-70mm +/- equivalent range where you also anticipate most of your photos, so I would just take the 12-40 f/2.8 Pro. Unless I was going mainly for wildlife, I'd be happy with 80mm equivalent and not fret about the few that got away. How many long telephoto travel photos are you really likely to take anyway? If you're a birder or just can't live with that, then you have to spend more money on a super zoom lens or a bridge camera.

I don't know much about bridge cameras but I suppose it's a reasonable option...I have a 1-inch compact and have never been unhappy with the IQ for travel photos.  I don't think I would get a smaller sensor, however.  I guess I'd have to explore the weights and sizes and costs and features to see how a bridge camera would compare to a G9 and a travel lens.

Whatever you decide, you'll come home with tons of great photos. Enjoy the trip!

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Henry Richardson Forum Pro • Posts: 16,827
Re: 12-200mm or 1" ZS100
2

Chizuka wrote:

if i had wanted to do that, i would not have asked this question. It is not an option to carry the 40-150 Pro!!!

Okay, then see this post:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63117003

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Henry Richardson
http://www.bakubo.com

LightCameraAction Regular Member • Posts: 172
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

If it were me, here is how I would proceed:

  • If I already had micro 4/3 cameras I would use them instead of getting a separate camera. Maybe get a small lens? After all, I chose micro 4/3 because it is portable.
  • If I was only interested in using a single lens on micro 4/3 bodies (particularly a kit lens or super zoom), I would seriously look at bridge cameras.
ChinaM43User Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Consider bridge or travel camera?
1

HRC2016 wrote:

Have you asked this question only of m43 users?

Have you considered how important image quality is?

Bridge cameras are pretty good. There are also the Panasonic travel zooms. Sony's new RX100 vii is getting phenomenal reviews but might be outside your budget. You can't beat it for size and image quality.

If I were trying to limit myself to just one camera and lens combo due to size and/or weight while covering a large focal length range, it would be the RX100 VII that I would select. I is a lot smaller and lighter than carrying similar m43 kit, and in many cases the slightly smaller sensor disadvantage is cancelled out more or lens by the faster lens.

On the other hand, if I was sticking with m43, I wouldn't limit myself to one lens, as the benefit of m43 is the huge selection of small lenses of excellent optical quality. In your situation, if using a m43 body, I would probably bring these 3 lenses with me:

-Panasonic 12-32 pancake zoom (I know this is a kit lens with some cameras, but it takes excellent pictures and is very compact when stowed. It is cheap and pocketable)

-Panasonic 20mm f1.7 (this was also a kit lens, it is very small and takes excellent pictures in most situations. When I was primarily a m43 shooter, I used this lens for about 90-95% of my shots -- over a ten year period)

-Panasonic 35-100 f4-5.6 OIS compact zoom (surprise, surprise, this was also available in some kits from Panasonic. It is a very small and portable lens with a broad focal length range and great image quality. It is the smallest telephoto that I know of for an ILC when stowed)

It is probably more comfortable to have any one of those lenses on the camera and the other two in a pocket or bag then carrying a broad focal length travel lens. This is why that was MY personal favorite at the time.

Now that I have mentioned what I would do, rather than directly answering the OPs question, here is my answer to the original question. I would select the Panasonic 14-150, which covers most of the range for the pure reason that it is available on the used market for very low prices if you look around.

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cosmicnode Veteran Member • Posts: 4,307
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

Chizuka wrote:

Hi, i am faced with a dilemma. I want to travel with only one camera and one lens because I will be walking a lot all day and I am a small woman. I would like the lens to cover a 12-150 range ideally (in mft terms) and I don’t want to buy the Olympus 12-100 PRO because of the cost.

I am looking at the new Olympus 12-200 or the older 14-150 f4.5/5.6 or at a bridge camera with a 1inch sensor. Is there a noticeable difference in IQ between the mft options and a Bridge camera like the Sony Rx10 mk3 or the Lumix FZ 2500 or something similar.

I would be using the Lumix G9 body.

There is very little difference in weight or size between your choices but the m4/3 will have overall a better image quality Here is a comparison of your 3 choices http://j.mp/2AC31z6

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(unknown member) New Member • Posts: 20
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

I bought a lightly used - unused really- FZ1000 on eBay for $360 shipped to my house. One happy hobbyist and traveler, and his wife is okay with the purchase too. No sign of imminent self destruction, lots of functions, easy transfer to the phone, RAW if you want it and good pictures with excellent stabilization. In really low light I go black and white  and I keep myself fresh trying all sorts of peculiar settings. Great fun, nice pictures and cheap as you like. If something goes wrong I'll get another, maybe the Mark 2 for a touch screen. Maybe not.

Leo_B
Leo_B Regular Member • Posts: 407
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?
2

I like the range your 12-200 idea gives you. I'd bend the one lens rule and take the P15f1.7 along in my pocket for night/indoor low light or to walkaround if I knew it was a day where I wouldn't need much reach and wanted to go featherweight.

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Miron09 Contributing Member • Posts: 907
Olympus EPl body & Lumix 1.7/20 & Sigma 2.8/60
1

compact, sharp, fast. This is what I carry in hardship locations or when I don^t want to use a camera bad. Cheap too: I just bought a second hand EPL7 for USD 100 & Sigma is around USD 200 & the Lumix is also around USD 200 second hand. Much smaller that a zoom. The Sigma is as sharp as the Nocticron, minus the speed

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Chizuka
OP Chizuka Contributing Member • Posts: 638
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

Scottelly wrote:

Chizuka wrote:

Hi, i am faced with a dilemma. I want to travel with only one camera and one lens because I will be walking a lot all day and I am a small woman. I would like the lens to cover a 12-150 range ideally (in mft terms) and I don’t want to buy the Olympus 12-100 PRO because of the cost.

I am looking at the new Olympus 12-200 or the older 14-150 f4.5/5.6 or at a bridge camera with a 1inch sensor. Is there a noticeable difference in IQ between the mft options and a Bridge camera like the Sony Rx10 mk3 or the Lumix FZ 2500 or something similar.

I would be using the Lumix G9 body.

To me there is a noticeable difference, but I'm the type of pixel peeper that views massive jpegs on a 50" screen, and then I stick my face up as close as my eyes will focus, which is less than 12" away. That means I may have a sickness, but it helps me make better quality photos . . . I think.

I am a pixel peeper too, maybe not quite a severe a case, but definitely I check carefully the IQ of my pictures and I am easily disappointed with pictures that a lot of people would be happy with.

I've used a Panasonic FZ1000. I was surprised how good the image quality was, and I was really surprised how light the camera feels (but the FZ2500 is not as light - you really won't save much weight by carrying the FZ2500 vs the G9 with 12-200 lens). The photos from that Panasonic FZ1000 look good on a 50" 4K screen when viewing the OOC jpegs in full-screen view. The FZ2500 photos will look basically identical (same 20 MP sensor, if I'm not mistaken). Sure, when pixel-peeping at 100% they don't look as good as what I'm used to seeing with my Nikon D810 and my Sigma cameras. Viewing full-screen is about equivalent to viewing a 30" x 40" print on canvas though, which woud be pretty impressive to just about anyone, I'm sure. A much bigger canvas print, like 60" x 80" maybe, would be so big that probably almost nobody would expect any more detail than the FZ1000 has to offer. Do you really need the faster speed and lens interchangeability of the G9? If not, why not at least try the much cheaper and lighter Panasonic?

I come from the 24 MP APS-C world, and I was impressed with the 20 MP photos from the Panasonic (though they were not quite as good as what I get from my Sony A65, of course). A 20 MP micro-four-thirds camera isn't as good as what I'm used to, so for me to be impressed with the results from the little 1" sensor in the FZ1000, well it's something special, if you ask me. I'm thinking that if you're not looking at full-frame cameras, because you're such a hard-core pixel peeper or because you plan to shoot at ISO 1600 a lot, then you'll be quite happy with the Panasonic FZ2500 (or an FZ1000). I'm sure that camera is good for shooting at ISO 100, 200, 400, and even 800. ISO 1600 seems to be a point where full-frame is necessary though. I have problems looking at ISO 1600 shots from my full-frame Nikon D810 though, so maybe I'm not the right person to be talking about high-ISO photography.

You might want to check out this tool:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=panasonic_dmcfz1000&attr13_1=panasonic_dcg9&attr13_2=nikon_d500&attr13_3=sony_a9&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr15_2=jpeg&attr15_3=jpeg&attr16_0=200&attr16_1=200&attr16_2=200&attr16_3=200&attr126_1=1&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.40387601792816114&y=-0.9316821509194931

There you can change the ISO setting, view RAW or JPG, and even select different lighting scenarios, such as this ISO 1600 scene:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=panasonic_dmcfz1000&attr13_1=panasonic_dcg9&attr13_2=nikon_d500&attr13_3=sony_a9&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr15_2=jpeg&attr15_3=jpeg&attr16_0=1600&attr16_1=1600&attr16_2=1600&attr16_3=1600&attr126_1=1&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.8634584686073391&y=-0.2303387693289357

Notice how at ISO 1600 the Panasonic has smoothed out the details so much with noise reduction that a lot of details are missing? You can move the images around to see more of the test scene. Viewing in raw helps to reveal how much noise there really is:

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=lowlight&attr13_0=panasonic_dmcfz1000&attr13_1=panasonic_dcg9&attr13_2=nikon_d500&attr13_3=sony_a9&attr15_0=raw&attr15_1=raw&attr15_2=raw&attr15_3=raw&attr16_0=1600&attr16_1=1600&attr16_2=1600&attr16_3=1600&attr126_1=1&normalization=full&widget=1&x=-0.8634584686073391&y=-0.2303387693289357

I hope my comment has been helpful. Good luck with your decision.

Your comment and links have been useful indeed. Thanks for taking the time to reply to my question.

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SteveS Regular Member • Posts: 163
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?
1

Greetings,

I vote for the Olympus 14-150. I have the Olympus EM5.2 and both of them together are very light. I’ve found the 14-150 to very sharp and love it.

As far as 1” superzooms…

I have the Sony Rx10 mk4. It’s a great camera but very heavy. After walking around with it for a while it’s going to feel like you have a boat anchor hanging from your neck.

Just my $0.02.

…Steve…

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Chizuka
OP Chizuka Contributing Member • Posts: 638
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

David5833 wrote:

You want to take just one body and one lens, and mass is important plus you don't want to spend a lot. You already own a G9 and an E-M10ii and a few lenses. You're reluctant to take the E-M10ii based on previous issues, so it makes sense that you would take the superb G9. I understand that you want just one camera, but the E-M10ii is so small and light that I might take it as a backup if I was traveling to remote places...just a thought.

I will definitely take the EM10 as a backup. Even if I end up just leaving it in my suitcase for emergency purposes only. This way, I would be able to walk around with one camera only most of the time.

The vast majority of my travel photos are in the 24-70mm +/- equivalent range where you also anticipate most of your photos, so I would just take the 12-40 f/2.8 Pro. Unless I was going mainly for wildlife, I'd be happy with 80mm equivalent and not fret about the few that got away. How many long telephoto travel photos are you really likely to take anyway? If you're a birder or just can't live with that, then you have to spend more money on a super zoom lens or a bridge camera.

I am a birder among other things but for this trip, I will not be. I leave the big guns behind i.e. PanaLeica 100-400!

I don't know much about bridge cameras but I suppose it's a reasonable option...I have a 1-inch compact and have never been unhappy with the IQ for travel photos. I don't think I would get a smaller sensor, however. I guess I'd have to explore the weights and sizes and costs and features to see how a bridge camera would compare to a G9 and a travel lens.

After having looked more carefully yesterday at the weight of the bridge cameras that interest me, it seems that there would not be much weight difference i.e. advantage, especially if I limit myself to one body. Thanks for your advice David.

Whatever you decide, you'll come home with tons of great photos. Enjoy the trip!

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“Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.” -
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https://500px.com/blue_iris
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 Chizuka's gear list:Chizuka's gear list
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm F2.8 Macro Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro Panasonic Leica 100-400mm F4.0-6.3 ASPH Panasonic 8-18mm F2.8-4
Chizuka
OP Chizuka Contributing Member • Posts: 638
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

cosmicnode wrote:

Chizuka wrote:

Hi, i am faced with a dilemma. I want to travel with only one camera and one lens because I will be walking a lot all day and I am a small woman. I would like the lens to cover a 12-150 range ideally (in mft terms) and I don’t want to buy the Olympus 12-100 PRO because of the cost.

I am looking at the new Olympus 12-200 or the older 14-150 f4.5/5.6 or at a bridge camera with a 1inch sensor. Is there a noticeable difference in IQ between the mft options and a Bridge camera like the Sony Rx10 mk3 or the Lumix FZ 2500 or something similar.

I would be using the Lumix G9 body.

There is very little difference in weight or size between your choices but the m4/3 will have overall a better image quality Here is a comparison of your 3 choices http://j.mp/2AC31z6

Thanks for the comparison! I did not know about that website. Great to see the visual comparison.

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“Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.” -
Robert Bresson.
https://500px.com/blue_iris
https://www.flickr.com/photos/chizuka/

 Chizuka's gear list:Chizuka's gear list
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm F2.8 Macro Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro Panasonic Leica 100-400mm F4.0-6.3 ASPH Panasonic 8-18mm F2.8-4
Chizuka
OP Chizuka Contributing Member • Posts: 638
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?

Thanks Steve for your valuable 2 cents!!!

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“Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.” -
Robert Bresson.
https://500px.com/blue_iris
https://www.flickr.com/photos/chizuka/

 Chizuka's gear list:Chizuka's gear list
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm F2.8 Macro Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro Panasonic Leica 100-400mm F4.0-6.3 ASPH Panasonic 8-18mm F2.8-4
Chizuka
OP Chizuka Contributing Member • Posts: 638
Re: One lens One body camera — mft or bridge camera?
2

Thank you very much everyone for your comments and advice. Always helpful. After doing more thinking, I will not get a bridge camera and will likely either buy the Oly 14-150 or the Pana 14-140 or just take my 12-40Pro and the kit 40-150 lens that I have, but I will walk around with only one body.

-- hide signature --

“Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.” -
Robert Bresson.
https://500px.com/blue_iris
https://www.flickr.com/photos/chizuka/

 Chizuka's gear list:Chizuka's gear list
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm F2.8 Macro Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro Panasonic Leica 100-400mm F4.0-6.3 ASPH Panasonic 8-18mm F2.8-4
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