A few questions re: new D5300

Started 2 months ago | Questions
Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
A few questions re: new D5300

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

The swivel screen, my thought, based on the experience from the D5100, is perhaps not to fold it to closed position after every use. I leave it in the gadget bag anyway when not in use, and when transporting. I also fitted a hardened glass protector.

Are there any good tips for back button focus settings, or are they similar to the 5100.

I see lots of fuss made about having more AF points, but I just find they end up focusing on the wrong subject. Single point tracking seems to be the most useful to me.

Finally, Auto ISO or not? I usually use it, but is it better to leave it manual in the PASM modes, and use full Auto otherwise. Or maybe just set it to a low maximum? I notice though that noise is pretty good on this sensor anyway.

Cheers.

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Andy

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Bobthearch
Bobthearch Veteran Member • Posts: 8,625
Re: A few questions re: new D5300

On the D5000 I always closed the screen when not in use.  But considering my 'new' camera doesn't have a swivel screen I've decided that after all those years it just didn't matter.

I tend to use single-point continuous AF.  Rather than having the camera track the subject, moving the camera and keeping the dot on the subject allows me to maintain composition easier.  But the AF options on the new cameras are so overwhelming that admittedly I settled on a 'simple' method to begin with and just stuck with it.

I only use manual ISO.  For me, after years of film use, selecting an ISO speed to match the amount of available light is quite simple.  And it's easy to bump up or down as needed, if you've maxed out the aperture and still need a faster shutter speed for instance.

Hope this helps.

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OP Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
Re: A few questions re: new D5300

Bobthearch wrote:

On the D5000 I always closed the screen when not in use. But considering my 'new' camera doesn't have a swivel screen I've decided that after all those years it just didn't matter.

I was thinking the same thing.

I tend to use single-point continuous AF. Rather than having the camera track the subject, moving the camera and keeping the dot on the subject allows me to maintain composition easier. But the AF options on the new cameras are so overwhelming that admittedly I settled on a 'simple' method to begin with and just stuck with it.

Yeah, I sometimes wonder if they’ve fixed a problem that doesn’t actually exist.

I only use manual ISO. For me, after years of film use, selecting an ISO speed to match the amount of available light is quite simple. And it's easy to bump up or down as needed, if you've maxed out the aperture and still need a faster shutter speed for instance.

I’m happy with either really, although I tend to go out shooting at a variety of subjects, and instant settings are often more useful to me.

I suppose what would be more useful, would be more separation between Auto and advanced modes so that everything could be switched independently for each. It seems I still need to adjust a few settings when choosing between them.

Hope this helps.

For sure, cheers

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Andy

 Andy Hewitt's gear list:Andy Hewitt's gear list
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Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 26,206
12
1

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

Only time you will notice any practical difference shooting 12 vs 14 bit is when pixel peeping really deep in shots where highlight detail can show the difference. Exposures where this is the case will be pretty rare. Even then, the difference will be hard to notice even when printing large

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My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

NicholasD
NicholasD Contributing Member • Posts: 666
Re: 12

Mako2011 wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

Only time you will notice any practical difference shooting 12 vs 14 bit is when pixel peeping really deep in shots where highlight detail can show the difference. Exposures where this is the case will be pretty rare. Even then, the difference will be hard to notice even when printing large

To which I’ll add that those differences become less noticeable as ISO is increased.

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romfordbluenose Veteran Member • Posts: 4,311
Re: A few questions re: new D5300

12 bit always.

Screen open always except when packed away.

Auto ISO with max set to 1600 and speed set to appropriate value for session.

My main gripe with D5300 is no fast way to turn auto on and off.

Single point focus with afs or afc using number of points appropriate for session. Normally with cl as sec9nd shot will reduce shake.

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Please don't quote long posts, it just fills up the forum with repetitive information. Just replying to the poster or selectively quoting will make it all easier to read.

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toomanycanons Forum Pro • Posts: 12,854
Re: A few questions re: new D5300
1

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

The swivel screen, my thought, based on the experience from the D5100, is perhaps not to fold it to closed position after every use. I leave it in the gadget bag anyway when not in use, and when transporting. I also fitted a hardened glass protector.

Are there any good tips for back button focus settings, or are they similar to the 5100.

I see lots of fuss made about having more AF points, but I just find they end up focusing on the wrong subject. Single point tracking seems to be the most useful to me.

Finally, Auto ISO or not? I usually use it, but is it better to leave it manual in the PASM modes, and use full Auto otherwise. Or maybe just set it to a low maximum? I notice though that noise is pretty good on this sensor anyway.

Cheers.

1) You'll never in a million years see the difference between 14 and 12 bit raw. Purists will argue there's a difference, I never could see it. However...storage is cheap, just set it to 14 bit raw, ya know, just in case you get really anal in the future and imagine you do see a difference.

However, always shoot raw + jpeg, that's what I do.  I never shoot just raw, I never shoot just jpeg.

2) I had two D5200 and always left it lcd screen out, I never folded it "backwards". In fact, I never articulated it because to use it that way means shooting in Live View and I never shoot in Live View and never worried about the screen being out any more than I worry about the screen being out on all my cameras that don't have articulating screens.

3) I never use "back button focus" so no advice there.

4) Single point always works, just focus and re-compose as needed.

5) Never use Auto ISO. Many others will tell you how handy Auto ISO is but just get used to setting your own ISO values until it's just muscle memory. Then and only then maybe default to Auto ISO in certain specific shooting scenarios...scenarios that I never find myself in, I want control over the ISO.

6) Shoot on A, never Auto. Sometimes M, sometimes S but never Auto. There, I said it.

Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 26,206
Easy......
3

toomanycanons wrote:

1) You'll never in a million years see the difference between 14 and 12 bit raw. Purists will argue there's a difference, I never could see it.

It's actually pretty easy to see (once pointed out) in images/scenes were it makes a noticeable difference. Lots of examples out there. But it's rare to shoot/process a scene were there is an actual benefit to shooting 14 vs 12. Where it matters...the folks doing it know what they are doing and doing it to good effect. That is not the norm though. But when it is done well....a pleasure to see and learn from

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My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

OP Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
Re: A few questions re: new D5300
1

toomanycanons wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

The swivel screen, my thought, based on the experience from the D5100, is perhaps not to fold it to closed position after every use. I leave it in the gadget bag anyway when not in use, and when transporting. I also fitted a hardened glass protector.

Are there any good tips for back button focus settings, or are they similar to the 5100.

I see lots of fuss made about having more AF points, but I just find they end up focusing on the wrong subject. Single point tracking seems to be the most useful to me.

Finally, Auto ISO or not? I usually use it, but is it better to leave it manual in the PASM modes, and use full Auto otherwise. Or maybe just set it to a low maximum? I notice though that noise is pretty good on this sensor anyway.

Cheers.

1) You'll never in a million years see the difference between 14 and 12 bit raw. Purists will argue there's a difference, I never could see it. However...storage is cheap, just set it to 14 bit raw, ya know, just in case you get really anal in the future and imagine you do see a difference.

Ok, thanks. For now I’ve just been switching between them, and then will see if I can tell any differences. Although at the moment, it’s more important to have a little extra speed, and storage capacity.

However, always shoot raw + jpeg, that's what I do. I never shoot just raw, I never shoot just jpeg.

I stopped all that many years ago, I only shoot Raw when I can. I guess I simply prefer the results, and the workflow. Even on my iPhone I use the Lightroom camera set to DNG mode.

2) I had two D5200 and always left it lcd screen out, I never folded it "backwards". In fact, I never articulated it because to use it that way means shooting in Live View and I never shoot in Live View and never worried about the screen being out any more than I worry about the screen being out on all my cameras that don't have articulating screens.

Yeah, that was my thought too.

3) I never use "back button focus" so no advice there.

Ok, I have tried it. Not too sure if it works for me or not. I like it as a method, but not convinced it works in all scenarios.

4) Single point always works, just focus and re-compose as needed.

Aye, I came from film SLR with a split prism screen, and then OLympus DSLR with only 3 points. I still only used the single centre point. 39 points seems like overkill to me - heck so does the lowest setting of 9.

5) Never use Auto ISO. Many others will tell you how handy Auto ISO is but just get used to setting your own ISO values until it's just muscle memory. Then and only then maybe default to Auto ISO in certain specific shooting scenarios...scenarios that I never find myself in, I want control over the ISO.

I don’t mind it, although I do usually set an upper limit - it’s most useful in madly varying conditions where I just want to get a picture. Such as this weekend at a family wedding, i set it to the full 12,800 as a max, as I was shooting flashless in wildly changing lighting conditions, and didn’t have time for messing about with changing settings.

6) Shoot on A, never Auto. Sometimes M, sometimes S but never Auto. There, I said it.

I tend to use P a lot, often A, and sometimes S - indeed I used S at the wedding, and let auto-iso take over.

Interesting stuff here, thanks, it’s all food for thought.

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Andy

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OP Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
Re: Easy......

Mako2011 wrote:

toomanycanons wrote:

1) You'll never in a million years see the difference between 14 and 12 bit raw. Purists will argue there's a difference, I never could see it.

It's actually pretty easy to see (once pointed out) in images/scenes were it makes a noticeable difference. Lots of examples out there. But it's rare to shoot/process a scene were there is an actual benefit to shooting 14 vs 12. Where it matters...the folks doing it know what they are doing and doing it to good effect. That is not the norm though. But when it is done well....a pleasure to see and learn from

I probably don’t have the viewing devices to take advantage anyway. My processing machine is a fairly ageing iMac, without Retina display, so I suspect I’m unlikely to see any benefit, or be able to edit to optimum.

I’ll certainly test both settings and see for myself though.

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Andy

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Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 26,206
Not a...

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

toomanycanons wrote:

1) You'll never in a million years see the difference between 14 and 12 bit raw. Purists will argue there's a difference, I never could see it.

It's actually pretty easy to see (once pointed out) in images/scenes were it makes a noticeable difference. Lots of examples out there. But it's rare to shoot/process a scene were there is an actual benefit to shooting 14 vs 12. Where it matters...the folks doing it know what they are doing and doing it to good effect. That is not the norm though. But when it is done well....a pleasure to see and learn from

I probably don’t have the viewing devices to take advantage anyway. My processing machine is a fairly ageing iMac, without Retina display, so I suspect I’m unlikely to see any benefit,

The type of display shouldn't matter as to one being able to see the difference.

or be able to edit to optimum.

Even a 15 year old version of Photoshop and an old computer can "take advantage". Trick is simply to be able to find a scene that the difference will be noticeable and to set the exposure so it can be displayed in post. Whether the difference is needed/desired/useful is a different matter and often subjective in nature.

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toomanycanons Forum Pro • Posts: 12,854
Re: A few questions re: new D5300
1

Andy Hewitt wrote:

toomanycanons wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

The swivel screen, my thought, based on the experience from the D5100, is perhaps not to fold it to closed position after every use. I leave it in the gadget bag anyway when not in use, and when transporting. I also fitted a hardened glass protector.

Are there any good tips for back button focus settings, or are they similar to the 5100.

I see lots of fuss made about having more AF points, but I just find they end up focusing on the wrong subject. Single point tracking seems to be the most useful to me.

Finally, Auto ISO or not? I usually use it, but is it better to leave it manual in the PASM modes, and use full Auto otherwise. Or maybe just set it to a low maximum? I notice though that noise is pretty good on this sensor anyway.

Cheers.

1) You'll never in a million years see the difference between 14 and 12 bit raw. Purists will argue there's a difference, I never could see it. However...storage is cheap, just set it to 14 bit raw, ya know, just in case you get really anal in the future and imagine you do see a difference.

Ok, thanks. For now I’ve just been switching between them, and then will see if I can tell any differences. Although at the moment, it’s more important to have a little extra speed, and storage capacity.

However, always shoot raw + jpeg, that's what I do. I never shoot just raw, I never shoot just jpeg.

I stopped all that many years ago, I only shoot Raw when I can. I guess I simply prefer the results, and the workflow. Even on my iPhone I use the Lightroom camera set to DNG mode.

2) I had two D5200 and always left it lcd screen out, I never folded it "backwards". In fact, I never articulated it because to use it that way means shooting in Live View and I never shoot in Live View and never worried about the screen being out any more than I worry about the screen being out on all my cameras that don't have articulating screens.

Yeah, that was my thought too.

3) I never use "back button focus" so no advice there.

Ok, I have tried it. Not too sure if it works for me or not. I like it as a method, but not convinced it works in all scenarios.

4) Single point always works, just focus and re-compose as needed.

Aye, I came from film SLR with a split prism screen, and then OLympus DSLR with only 3 points. I still only used the single centre point. 39 points seems like overkill to me - heck so does the lowest setting of 9.

5) Never use Auto ISO. Many others will tell you how handy Auto ISO is but just get used to setting your own ISO values until it's just muscle memory. Then and only then maybe default to Auto ISO in certain specific shooting scenarios...scenarios that I never find myself in, I want control over the ISO.

I don’t mind it, although I do usually set an upper limit - it’s most useful in madly varying conditions where I just want to get a picture. Such as this weekend at a family wedding, i set it to the full 12,800 as a max, as I was shooting flashless in wildly changing lighting conditions, and didn’t have time for messing about with changing settings.

6) Shoot on A, never Auto. Sometimes M, sometimes S but never Auto. There, I said it.

I tend to use P a lot, often A, and sometimes S - indeed I used S at the wedding, and let auto-iso take over.

Interesting stuff here, thanks, it’s all food for thought.

"I stopped all that many years ago, I only shoot Raw when I can. I guess I simply prefer the results, and the workflow. Even on my iPhone I use the Lightroom camera set to DNG mode."

Which makes no sense, at least to me.  You prefer the results from shooting only raw, as if shooting jpeg + raw can't do the same?   I shoot thousands of shots a month, jpeg + raw and , indeed, only process the raws but having the jpegs at hand for a lot of reasons is just really handy.  For me.

Auto ISO shooters usually give the same reasons as you just did and I can't argue with what a person thinks he needs for his shooting workflow.  Me, I've never used Auto ISO but it looks like you already knew you were going to always be shooting on Auto ISO when you started this thread.  Glad I could help 

OP Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
Re: 12

NicholasD wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Thought this might be better in a new thread from my dead D5100 one.

First question, what’s the take on 14bit vs 12bit modes? I’ve found some stuff online, which gave more information, but also seem to confuse things more too. I’ve left it on 12bit for now, thinking about storage space while on holiday.

Only time you will notice any practical difference shooting 12 vs 14 bit is when pixel peeping really deep in shots where highlight detail can show the difference. Exposures where this is the case will be pretty rare. Even then, the difference will be hard to notice even when printing large

To which I’ll add that those differences become less noticeable as ISO is increased.

Thanks guys, I’ll stick with 12bit for the rest of the holiday, and probably do some testing once I get back, and have time to muck about a bit more. I only got the camera a couple of days before flying out, so didn't’ Get much chance then.

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Andy

 Andy Hewitt's gear list:Andy Hewitt's gear list
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OP Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
Re: A few questions re: new D5300

romfordbluenose wrote:

12 bit always.

Screen open always except when packed away.

Auto ISO with max set to 1600 and speed set to appropriate value for session.

Interesting, I used that on the D5100, I was  wondering if the noise was better on the D5300 to bump this up a bit.

My main gripe with D5300 is no fast way to turn auto on and off.

yes, I agree with that. I have been playing around switching between P and Auto, which does do that, but still leaves other stuff needing switching, or switches stuff I don’t want.

Single point focus with afs or afc using number of points appropriate for session. Normally with cl as sec9nd shot will reduce shake.

Yes, I think single point is still the most reliable, although multi is useful for quick reaction candid stuff.

I’m still toying with back button method too, but not sure if I can stick with that. I like it when I’m on one of my walks for taking pictures, but for thing like candid family events, standard settings seem to work better.

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Andy

 Andy Hewitt's gear list:Andy Hewitt's gear list
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OP Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 4,024
Re: A few questions re: new D5300

toomanycanons wrote:

"I stopped all that many years ago, I only shoot Raw when I can. I guess I simply prefer the results, and the workflow. Even on my iPhone I use the Lightroom camera set to DNG mode."

Which makes no sense, at least to me. You prefer the results from shooting only raw, as if shooting jpeg + raw can't do the same? I shoot thousands of shots a month, jpeg + raw and , indeed, only process the raws but having the jpegs at hand for a lot of reasons is just really handy. For me.

Fine. We have all these options for a reason. I have tried shooting both, but never used the JPEGs, so see no point in wasting storage space, or time to deal with them.

Auto ISO shooters usually give the same reasons as you just did and I can't argue with what a person thinks he needs for his shooting workflow. Me, I've never used Auto ISO but it looks like you already knew you were going to always be shooting on Auto ISO when you started this thread. Glad I could help

I find it hard to validate an opinion on something that’s ‘never used’ by someone giving advice! I appreciate you probably have your reasons for not using such a feature, but simply saying ‘I never use it’, isn’t particularly useful information.

Besides, the question was relating to the technical capability of the camera, which you clearly can’t answer as it’s a function you’ve never used.

And no, I don’t know I’m always going to shoot Auto-ISO, but on this occasion it was a tool available that worked in the circumstances. I see all the functions of a camera as a set of tools for different jobs, I’ll use them as needed if it gets the pictures.

There are times when I want to use traditional photography techniques, and times when I simply just need to get ‘snapshots’. So, there’s no need to be snobby about it ;-). I certainly don’t base my photography techniques on the advice of one person!

best regards

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Andy

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