* Wed C&C "No Theme" Thread #594 on 2019 09 11 *

Started 2 months ago | Discussions
Scott Whittemore
Scott Whittemore Veteran Member • Posts: 4,648
Re: The Riches of Frankfurt and Venice

Interesting contrast in riches. Well seen.

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Scott Whittemore
Scott Whittemore Veteran Member • Posts: 4,648
Re: Photo exhibition space ..

That's a nice exhibition space and your image captures it nicely. I'm not sure how I feel about the brightening around the edges (reverse vignetting?). I'm generally not a fan of vignetting, though I understand the appeal in some cases.

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Zindanfel
Zindanfel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,586
Re: Dry-Dock

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Two versions of the same image, from a trip last Sunday to the old municipal dry-docks in the historic part of the Antwerp harbour:

Hints of Escher, although overall seems more in the spirit of engineering than art.

Color version reveals regular presence of water, a clue probably meaningful to boating/fishing people.

The monochrome view could suggest some aspect of an 18th Century penitentiary, or perhaps a structure akin to munitions bunkers of the type I've seen at old coastal defense forts in Washington State.

The shot would be transformed, emotionally, by presence of life -- a bird, a dog, a human. Even graffiti could swing the pendulum.

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Don

Zindanfel
Zindanfel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,586
Re: London Underground

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Fox328 wrote:

Sometimes you don't have time enough to view all the pictures you've taken. A "problem" introduced by digital photography when te limitation of taking only 24 pictures was lifted. While testing a new printer yesterday i came across this picture, which somehow was new to me.

This does not do much for me.

It shows the movement of the subway train, but other than that it cannot really grab me.

The static elements of the image (the ceiling above the train) is not interesting enough to provide a meaningful counterpoint to the movement.

This would be very different if, for example, we would see a moving train as blurred background to a person standing still on the platform, or any other such combination.

My impression is similar to Roel's -- I'm not finding a compelling "hook" of drama/contrast/novelty to pull me in.  I think the motion dynamic could use a stronger foil than is offered by the overhead area.

It might be interesting to crop off the top just above the black line, then use some variety of art filter to edge-define the blocks of color, thus giving the image an abstract, color-field look.

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Don

Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 7,284
Re: A Long Story
1

Scott Whittemore wrote:

Long ago, deep in the Earth’s crust somewhere in what is now North America, maybe Northern New England or Eastern Canada, a surge of magma somehow caused a layer of bedrock to fracture and be inundated by hot silica-rich fluid. The fluid lacked the heat to melt the bedrock but was probably hot enough to bake and alter it. Eventually, this slurry cooled off and hardened, forming what is known as a breccia.

Some huge span of time later, subsequent tectonic activity had further tortured the breccia and erosion at the surface had removed enough of its overburden to bring it within reach of weathering, erosion, and glacial action. One large chunk of the breccia broke off at some point and became entrained in glacial ice. For many thousands of years, it tumbled along, scraping and colliding with other materials at the base of a huge glacier. By the time the glaciers receded, something like 12,500 years ago, the battered breccia boulder and its accompanying glacial till were located in what is now Eastern Massachusetts.

Over many more thousands of years, the boulder sat quietly, buried in glacial till and subsequent deposits of sediment and decaying vegetable matter. Shallow enough to be regularly exposed to oxygen-rich, slightly acidic aqueous solutions percolating down through the soil from above, the boulder’s outer surface slowly etched and eroded. The fragments of that original bedrock were slightly softer and eroded faster than the harder quartz-rich glue that held them together.

Finally, maybe a couple hundred years ago, a farmer probably dug the boulder out of a field he wanted to cultivate.

And then, in April 2006, passing that field on my way to work at about sunrise, I finally made the decision to stop and photograph it.

I’m posting two versions of this image. The version I now include in my online galleries followed by the original version.

Thanks for reading the long story.

Current Modified Version

...

The original (with minor color/tonality adjustments and some sharpening):

I love this kind of stuff and I love looking at the evidence and admiring the thought processes of those who interpret the stories.

If it wasn't for the tree, I'd prefer the original version because of the composition. Having the large boulder closer to the edge of the frame feels better balanced. Generally, I have a preference for left to right movement in composition as well.

The receding line of rocks is fitting for a story about the passing of time.

The revised shot gives a better appreciation of the textures that are significant to the story. I wouldn't mind seeing a much closer up shot of the rock textures/colours as well.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 7,284
Re: Requisite Trip to Familia Sagrada - Photo Story

minniev wrote:

I understood before going to Barcelona that Familia Sagrada was required viewing, so we got advance tickets to avoid the long hot lines and hailed an early taxi to be in the first groups to enter. Still, it was a daunting experience - a massive, convoluted and not yet complete after 100 years structure filled to the brim with tourists. The size of the thing makes it hard enough to photograph, and the crowds complete the challenge.

I tried to think of something I could do that might be different, and all I could come up with was to photograph at slightly off center angles to create visually the sense of imbalance and chaos I felt in this thing. So the visual worrisome-ness is purposeful. Of course I'm not sure any of that works. But anyway.

As you say Minniev, possibilities everywhere but hard to get an original angle. The colours and shapes are irresistible however. It is yet another place where the crowds utterly destroy the atmosphere that the architect and builders worked so hard to create.

All of which is why I like your last shot.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 26,659
Re: A Long Story

Scott Whittemore wrote:

Long ago, deep in the Earth’s crust somewhere in what is now North America, maybe Northern New England or Eastern Canada, a surge of magma somehow caused a layer of bedrock to fracture and be inundated by hot silica-rich fluid. The fluid lacked the heat to melt the bedrock but was probably hot enough to bake and alter it. Eventually, this slurry cooled off and hardened, forming what is known as a breccia.

Some huge span of time later, subsequent tectonic activity had further tortured the breccia and erosion at the surface had removed enough of its overburden to bring it within reach of weathering, erosion, and glacial action. One large chunk of the breccia broke off at some point and became entrained in glacial ice. For many thousands of years, it tumbled along, scraping and colliding with other materials at the base of a huge glacier. By the time the glaciers receded, something like 12,500 years ago, the battered breccia boulder and its accompanying glacial till were located in what is now Eastern Massachusetts.

Over many more thousands of years, the boulder sat quietly, buried in glacial till and subsequent deposits of sediment and decaying vegetable matter. Shallow enough to be regularly exposed to oxygen-rich, slightly acidic aqueous solutions percolating down through the soil from above, the boulder’s outer surface slowly etched and eroded. The fragments of that original bedrock were slightly softer and eroded faster than the harder quartz-rich glue that held them together.

Finally, maybe a couple hundred years ago, a farmer probably dug the boulder out of a field he wanted to cultivate.

And then, in April 2006, passing that field on my way to work at about sunrise, I finally made the decision to stop and photograph it.

I’m posting two versions of this image. The version I now include in my online galleries followed by the original version.

Thanks for reading the long story.

Current Modified Version

...

The original (with minor color/tonality adjustments and some sharpening):

a) Interesting geological story.  How time is relative!

b) Impressive modification of the image by flipping and removing the small tree in front of the boulder.  It is the kind of intervention I would never even consider doing.  I would probably just try to find a vantage point in the field where the tree does not obstruct the view of the boulder.  (I do realize that in this case, that would be impossible, if we also want to show the trail of smaller rocks behind it.)

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: http://www.roelh.zenfolio.com

RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 26,659
Re: The Riches of Frankfurt and Venice

P3T3S wrote:

Taken recently during an exhibition of Titian and the Venetian Renaissance masters

Pete

Interesting juxtaposition of old and new.

The direction of the glance of the painted figure seems to suggest he would rather not look at modern architecture.

What a different impression would be made if you shot an image that combined both elements but in the opposite order (and I do not mean flipped, but by taking an actual different position, more to the right, bringing the banner to the left of the buildings/skyline).  In such an imagined view, the historic figure would seem to look upon modern skyscraper architecture with polite interest....

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: http://www.roelh.zenfolio.com

Scott Whittemore
Scott Whittemore Veteran Member • Posts: 4,648
Re: London Underground

These days, as I immerse myself in retirement, having recently escaped the too-fast and accelerating IT environment, this image depicts my view of my recent past.

I find the image appealing, graphically, as a nice, fairly well balanced arrangement of shapes, lines and colors. I think it might serve well as a backdrop to something else, or in a wallpaper background type of role. As a stand-alone image, I think it lacks a strong center of interest, although it does hold my attention as I try to discern individual passengers in the blur.

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Scott Whittemore
Scott Whittemore Veteran Member • Posts: 4,648
Re: A Long Story

RoelHendrickx wrote:

a) Interesting geological story. How time is relative!

b) Impressive modification of the image by flipping and removing the small tree in front of the boulder. It is the kind of intervention I would never even consider doing. I would probably just try to find a vantage point in the field where the tree does not obstruct the view of the boulder. (I do realize that in this case, that would be impossible, if we also want to show the trail of smaller rocks behind it.)

Thanks, Roel.

I often scold myself for not having sought more alternative views to include/exclude, enhance, or accentuate/minimize some feature of a scene or subject. This particular image sat unused for a long time because I felt I had framed it poorly, with the boulder too close to the left edge, the clouds cut off, and a few other things. As soon as I looked at the image, I was disappointed that I hadn't gotten a wider view. Lately, though, I have drifted away from a journalistic approach to photography and into something more akin to creative design. I really enjoy working on images in the "digital darkroom." These days when I'm out shooting, I increasingly see my self as collecting new material to play with in Lightroom and, occasionally but increasingly, Photoshop. I also spend a lot of time browsing my archives looking for previously unrecognized potential, as Ibn this case.

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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 7,284
Re: London Underground

Fox328 wrote:

Sometimes you don't have time enough to view all the pictures you've taken. A "problem" introduced by digital photography when te limitation of taking only 24 pictures was lifted. While testing a new printer yesterday i came across this picture, which somehow was new to me.

Ditto to your problem in keeping up with close examination and evaluation of one's digital image collection. I try to spend a little time each week looking at old collections. Some I discover and note for further attention. Many I cull and I try to be ruthless about this. It is too easy to drown in images.

Playing around with motion blur like this is fun. Here, the figures have just enough detail for the viewer to feel that these are people that flashed past, momentarily intersecting with us. The two red blobs in the right hand window are effective in giving balance to the red door.

The black lines, top and bottom, help frame the window shapes. Maybe treat the top line as a horizon square it up?

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 7,284
Re: Dry-Dock

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Two versions of the same image, from a trip last Sunday to the old municipal dry-docks in the historic part of the Antwerp harbour:

Did Escher ever visit this spot? The water tanks of India also immediately come to mind.

The pattern of steps from different angles gets our interest. Some are seen from the side, some of the front surface in shadow, some show more of the top surface. The pattern repeats but with differing emphasis.

It is highly likely that the following comments wouldn't hold up if I was looking at prints or seeing these on a large, quality monitor. As it stands, on my present small laptop screen, the B&W looks a little too dark. The tone range of the shot feels a bit too compressed.The large central black area lacks details and has become featureless. In the colour version, enough detail is retained  to give depth and structure to this area .

I prefer the muted green, bottom right, to the B&W rendering of the same area. Again, on a large B&W print it may well feel quite different.

Old brick and stonework is great for photography.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 26,659
Gotcha!

Mike Fewster wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Two versions of the same image, from a trip last Sunday to the old municipal dry-docks in the historic part of the Antwerp harbour:

Did Escher ever visit this spot? The water tanks of India also immediately come to mind.

The dry-docks are pretty big structures in the harbour.

I also took photos that show them full-scale and one with a ship inside.

But I concentrated on this small part (steps leading down and the slide over which large components can be hoisted up and down, exactly because it reminded me of the lace-like structures of those indian water "step" wells.

Look here for a magnificent example:

http://www.ritebook.in/2014/04/Ancient-Step-well-Chand-Baori-Abhaneri-India.html

The pattern of steps from different angles gets our interest. Some are seen from the side, some of the front surface in shadow, some show more of the top surface. The pattern repeats but with differing emphasis.

It is highly likely that the following comments wouldn't hold up if I was looking at prints or seeing these on a large, quality monitor. As it stands, on my present small laptop screen, the B&W looks a little too dark. The tone range of the shot feels a bit too compressed.The large central black area lacks details and has become featureless. In the colour version, enough detail is retained to give depth and structure to this area .

I prefer the muted green, bottom right, to the B&W rendering of the same area. Again, on a large B&W print it may well feel quite different.

Old brick and stonework is great for photography.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: http://www.roelh.zenfolio.com

Zindanfel
Zindanfel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,586
Re: More on the Sulphur porters

Mike Fewster wrote:

This series is rather longer and bends our rules. I jammed more in so that I am not on the same topic for too many weeks. Next week, shots of the volcano itself.

I went to Kawah Ijen with a photography crazy friend, Heinz. He has been working on an ambition to climb every volcano in Java above 3000 metres and shoot it at dawn. When he discovered the sulphur porters he set up a number of programs to help them. Mine are just record shots but they give an idea of the project. Here’s an interview with Heinz and some of his shots.

http://www.baliadventureguide.com/interviews/interview-with-heinz-vol-holzen/

He had trolleys designed and constructed to make carrying bigger loads easier. The porters work as they do in the hope that their children will have a better future. Heinz has been assisting the school and children. The clothes of the porters disintegrate from the fumes. He brings up supplies of used clothing for them to wear at work.

Human nature, being what it is…The porters found that tourists would pay to be taken up and down the volcano in the carts. This pays better than carrying sulphur. So some trollies were modified. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a shot of them in use. More human nature…The porters keep some of the old baskets because tourists prefer to photograph hem using the old baskets across their shoulders.

Heinz brings up spare parts for the porter’s trollies. Here are porters with spare tyres and brake parts that came on our trip.

Not all the donated clothes are appropriate when unpacked.

A new toilet block was opened at the school.

Heinz and schoolchildren.

A porter

This essay's viewer-friendly narrative flow respects the dignity of people in humble circumstances and also rewards a viewer with insights to universal aspects of human behavior.

Throughout, but especially in the first and last frames, Mike's essay deftly makes the case that Art may reside in anyone's soul.

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Don

Zindanfel
Zindanfel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,586
Re: The Riches of Frankfurt and Venice

P3T3S wrote:

Taken recently during an exhibition of Titian and the Venetian Renaissance masters

Pete

"...and never the twain shall meet."

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Don

Zindanfel
Zindanfel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,586
Re: Requisite Trip to Familia Sagrada - Photo Story

minniev wrote:

I understood before going to Barcelona that Familia Sagrada was required viewing, so we got advance tickets to avoid the long hot lines and hailed an early taxi to be in the first groups to enter. Still, it was a daunting experience - a massive, convoluted and not yet complete after 100 years structure filled to the brim with tourists. The size of the thing makes it hard enough to photograph, and the crowds complete the challenge.

I tried to think of something I could do that might be different, and all I could come up with was to photograph at slightly off center angles to create visually the sense of imbalance and chaos I felt in this thing. So the visual worrisome-ness is purposeful. Of course I'm not sure any of that works. But anyway.

This structure I cannot wrap my mind around.  Seeing photos of it is like having a dream of something impossible, but upon waking the impossible does not dissolve into fantasy.

I suppose the main story (for most of us non-architects) is the crowds, sad as that is.

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Don

Scott Whittemore
Scott Whittemore Veteran Member • Posts: 4,648
Re: Requisite Trip to Familia Sagrada - Photo Story

A bit like trying to get an original looking photo of Lake Louise. I really like your second shot. Interesting lines and colors. I would love to see this structure in person but it's probably worse than Costco one a Saturday afternoon.

If I did brave the crowds, I probably would want my 40-150 lens so I could try & isolate interesting details.

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Scott Whittemore
Scott Whittemore Veteran Member • Posts: 4,648
Re: Dry-Dock

There is a similar dry dock in Charlestown, MA, USA, made of granite. I got some photos similar to yours a few years back but I was disappointed in them. I don't think they were as good as yours. Maybe I'll dig them up and take another look. You isolated a nice, simple diagonal feature that makes an interesting, balanced composition. I think I prefer the monochrome version. The light is harsh and the shadows are very dark but not without detail, which rewards a closer look.

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 1,290
Re: Dry-Dock

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Two versions of the same image, from a trip last Sunday to the old municipal dry-docks in the historic part of the Antwerp harbour:

This image is about graphic shapes and textures, and I would normally go for a B&W interpretation. Surprisingly, I actually prefer the colour version! I think it is because the palette is extremely limited, with just golden browns and and a touch of greens, so the colours do not distract, in fact the greens add a little touch of life.

Whether it is due to its age, the regular contact with sea-water or the original consistency, I don't know, but the concrete has a beautiful texture.

The presence of a person to give it scale is done in surrugate by the steps - knowing the size of a human step, we can guess the size of the structure.

It is a seemingly simple, but actually very effective image.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 1,290
Re: London Underground

Fox328 wrote:

Sometimes you don't have time enough to view all the pictures you've taken. A "problem" introduced by digital photography when te limitation of taking only 24 pictures was lifted. While testing a new printer yesterday i came across this picture, which somehow was new to me.

I agree with others, that a more interesting sharp anchor point would benefit this photo. A person waiting as the train passes, or part of the opposite platform sharp as the front or end of the train passeshalf or two thirds of the frame, for instance. As it is the corner with the beam adds a sharp focus point, but is not that interesting.

However, the amount of blur is excellent. The train is blurred to show motion, but there is just enough sharpness for the eye to enjoy trying to look at the people, so all is not lost!

Pete

 P3T3S's gear list:P3T3S's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL5 Olympus E-M1 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 9-18mm F4.0-5.6 Panasonic Leica D Summilux Asph 25mm F1.4 +9 more
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