Film Scanner

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
Erik Ohlson
Erik Ohlson Forum Pro • Posts: 21,526
Re: Film Scanner - With Examples.

Barry Duggan Photography wrote:

Hi, I'm looking for a scanner for my 35mm film. Is there any good suggestions?, I have an iMac. I was looking at Plustek but I believe the software can be tricky to work. Ive also looked at the cheaper Kodak Scanza.

Thanks

Just posted this on this same forum:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63085464

- my vote is for Epson slide/ negative scanning - with examples. I use it with an iMac steer clear of cheapie "scanners", even a use "Real" scanner is much better.

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bodensee Regular Member • Posts: 121
Re: Film Scanner
1

I've been interested to see all the replies. I scan semi-professionally for a couple of Archives and for myself. I've tried most ways except the DSLR one. I either own or have available Nikon Coolscans and Epson Flatbed V700 and V800s. Like everything in life it's all a balance between practicality, convenience and quality.

The best compromise so far has been to use the Flatbed scanners with the Epson software in what they describe as Professional mode. I decided some time ago to scan at 24bit to reduce scanning times and to reduce files sizes, everything is scanned as a tiff. I truly defy anyone to tell the difference when printed in a book, magazine or normal colour print between 24 & 48 bit. Given a perfect set of circumstances in a very high end printer, using the best quality paper and inks then yes it might be possible. How many of us do that regularly?

The biggest issue I had with the V800 was the new scanning holders which are glass mounted thus introducing more dust gathering surfaces, I bought some extra V700 holders which hold more and are fine. There is a software issue with the Epson V800 package in that they will not recognise the old holders for automatic production so I have to use marquees you can set up and scan in normal mode, for slides it's easy as they don't need to be changed, bit of a faff with negatives but having done about 20000 so far I've got quite quick at it.

You can never get rid of all the dust, you can never get rid of all the scratches so this is done in software, Photoshop mostly as I'm used to it. I can scan around 60 slides an hour using the simple organisational techniques I've developed. If someone does want something special from an existing scan we take the original out of deep storage and rescan it, so far this has happened once in 8 years and I've had over 2000 of the scans printed in books and magazines.

Vuescan is the best software, no question, but it's not quite so friendly as the Epson stuff and takes a while to get set up. We are about to embark on a large project using a bulk slide loader on a Nikon Coolscan and we will have to use Vuescan for that. We have approximately 1.5m to do. We hope to be able to do 250 a day but we will see!

We are also going to have a look at the DSLR method  for this project as well. We could do with a proper system for this, all the videos and suggestions are home made. We want and need something better and that is 100% consistent and can then be used by anyone whether they have scanning/photographic knowledge or not.

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Bodensee

Dave Braun Contributing Member • Posts: 594
Re: Film Scanner

Very interesting. I have been doing similar work at the Royal Geographical Society. I am using Phase 1 iXG and C1 Cultural Heritage. The copy stand can have a light box inserted in the table with a frame stood over it. I was able to fit 9 glass lantern slides on at a time or 20 35mm slides. Shoot straight to EIP. A session is created for each box and given it's catalogue name. Quality is just amazing.

HD of images is sent to our company in Wakefield and then transferred to US where they crop and export. Then to India for checking.

I have also shot photo albums too and results are good but Phase 1 really haven't sorted out the lighting for this just a couple of flat LED panels. Glare off the prints can be a problem.

Another piece of equipment you could look at it a Gamma by Metis, uses a DLSR. When I was at National Archives at Kew I was using one with the Cannon 5DS. It's main use is for documents and books. But it has a very cleaver trick up it's sleeve for shooting photographs. It has four strip lights and for photographs takes a shot first with the left hand lights on and then a second with the right hand lights on and merges the two and this eliminates the glare. Very quick too.

Think you could put a light box on the table and shoot slides with it. I was able to shoot some X Rays on an LED light sheet this way.

Software for the Metis is pretty good too shooting straight to TIFF or jpeg and numbering that lets you go back and insert reshoots in the right place and all the numbers following will be moved up, if say you had missed one.

bodensee Regular Member • Posts: 121
Re: Film Scanner

Dave Braun wrote:

Very interesting. I have been doing similar work at the Royal Geographical Society. I am using Phase 1 iXG and C1 Cultural Heritage. The copy stand can have a light box inserted in the table with a frame stood over it. I was able to fit 9 glass lantern slides on at a time or 20 35mm slides. Shoot straight to EIP. A session is created for each box and given it's catalogue name. Quality is just amazing.

HD of images is sent to our company in Wakefield and then transferred to US where they crop and export. Then to India for checking.

I have also shot photo albums too and results are good but Phase 1 really haven't sorted out the lighting for this just a couple of flat LED panels. Glare off the prints can be a problem.

Another piece of equipment you could look at it a Gamma by Metis, uses a DLSR. When I was at National Archives at Kew I was using one with the Cannon 5DS. It's main use is for documents and books. But it has a very cleaver trick up it's sleeve for shooting photographs. It has four strip lights and for photographs takes a shot first with the left hand lights on and then a second with the right hand lights on and merges the two and this eliminates the glare. Very quick too.

Think you could put a light box on the table and shoot slides with it. I was able to shoot some X Rays on an LED light sheet this way.

Software for the Metis is pretty good too shooting straight to TIFF or jpeg and numbering that lets you go back and insert reshoots in the right place and all the numbers following will be moved up, if say you had missed one.

Many thanks for this. The Archives I work at are not so well financed to go for Phase 1 equipment, unfortunately. We are working at one towards the national standards, not the other though we duplicate the standard in the other as far as the budget will permit. I will have a look at Gamma though, we have a very large number of photo albums which need dealing with and so far we have put in the "difficult" box! Then the ability to do slides as well may make this tempting.

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Bodensee

Dave Braun Contributing Member • Posts: 594
Re: Film Scanner

bodensee wrote:

Dave Braun wrote:

Very interesting. I have been doing similar work at the Royal Geographical Society. I am using Phase 1 iXG and C1 Cultural Heritage. The copy stand can have a light box inserted in the table with a frame stood over it. I was able to fit 9 glass lantern slides on at a time or 20 35mm slides. Shoot straight to EIP. A session is created for each box and given it's catalogue name. Quality is just amazing.

HD of images is sent to our company in Wakefield and then transferred to US where they crop and export. Then to India for checking.

I have also shot photo albums too and results are good but Phase 1 really haven't sorted out the lighting for this just a couple of flat LED panels. Glare off the prints can be a problem.

Another piece of equipment you could look at it a Gamma by Metis, uses a DLSR. When I was at National Archives at Kew I was using one with the Cannon 5DS. It's main use is for documents and books. But it has a very cleaver trick up it's sleeve for shooting photographs. It has four strip lights and for photographs takes a shot first with the left hand lights on and then a second with the right hand lights on and merges the two and this eliminates the glare. Very quick too.

Think you could put a light box on the table and shoot slides with it. I was able to shoot some X Rays on an LED light sheet this way.

Software for the Metis is pretty good too shooting straight to TIFF or jpeg and numbering that lets you go back and insert reshoots in the right place and all the numbers following will be moved up, if say you had missed one.

Many thanks for this. The Archives I work at are not so well financed to go for Phase 1 equipment, unfortunately. We are working at one towards the national standards, not the other though we duplicate the standard in the other as far as the budget will permit. I will have a look at Gamma though, we have a very large number of photo albums which need dealing with and so far we have put in the "difficult" box! Then the ability to do slides as well may make this tempting.

I think the ability to do slides on the Gamma is a bit of a workaround that you would need to do some tests on. The problem is it shoots TIFF's or jpeg so you will need to find a way to crop up multiple slides to make a new file for each slide.

For your albums Gamma will be good as it has built in book cradle and each half can be set at different angles to support the book as you shoot. It can also auto detect the pages and gutter to auto crop to 2 pages with a file and number for each.

bodensee Regular Member • Posts: 121
Re: Film Scanner

I think the ability to do slides on the Gamma is a bit of a workaround that you would need to do some tests on. The problem is it shoots TIFF's or jpeg so you will need to find a way to crop up multiple slides to make a new file for each slide.

For your albums Gamma will be good as it has built in book cradle and each half can be set at different angles to support the book as you shoot. It can also auto detect the pages and gutter to auto crop to 2 pages with a file and number for each.

Much appreciated, thanks.

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Bodensee

Dave Braun Contributing Member • Posts: 594
Re: Film Scanner

bodensee wrote:

I think the ability to do slides on the Gamma is a bit of a workaround that you would need to do some tests on. The problem is it shoots TIFF's or jpeg so you will need to find a way to crop up multiple slides to make a new file for each slide.

For your albums Gamma will be good as it has built in book cradle and each half can be set at different angles to support the book as you shoot. It can also auto detect the pages and gutter to auto crop to 2 pages with a file and number for each.

Much appreciated, thanks.

Your welcome.

Just to add the way this is financed is by online publishing rather than the archive paying for it themselves.

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