At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

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AussiePhil Contributing Member • Posts: 579
3k+ at sports events

Nothing unusual to come back with 3k+ images from even a partial day at a race track or tennis event.

Highest number was close to 10k one day at the Aus Open tennis a few years back now. That day spanned over 12hrs of shooting

apart from the end of day cull 18fps is addictive and even very short bursts add up over 3 to 8 hours

I can normally cull a few thousand in an evening if needed.

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BillyBobSenna
BillyBobSenna Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

Mark_A wrote:

BillyBobSenna wrote:

5000+ per day at motorsports events. This is basically shooting continuously from 8 AM to 5

That is a lot of images bill, are you professional and how do you manage your post processing ?

Mark_A

I shoot for a few different outlets. Photography is a weekend job/hobby.

For most events, I need to provide specific photos within minutes of the end of an event (race start, winner on track, victory podium), the remainder of the shots are required late the same day. In all, I typically provide about 300 photos by the end of a race day. Off season and years later, I will select and process many of the other shots from a weekend.

I download, select, and crop photos in Photo Mechanic. Once photos are selected, I drag into Lightroom and use several of the Lightroom presets I have created to speed up the processing.

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fferreres Veteran Member • Posts: 3,013
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?
2

Mark_A wrote:

I know some of you are just sprayers and prayers just teasing, but at what events did you shoot the most images.

Just trying to get an idea of what people feel is a lot because I expect we will have different feelings on this topic.

For me at everyday subjects I normally shoot between 30-90 and when reviewing them am happy if I get one proper special keeper.

On the higher side I went to a motor sports event and shot 400. At least 400 is all I have left, perhaps I shot more and deleted a load I can't remember. Anyhow 400 is my top so far.

What about you? where how many and why?

Mark_A

I was kind of asking myself a similar related question. Should I shoot more, or less? I was having this feeling that if I shoot too little, I miss lots of opportunities and never am ready at the best times; like becoming shy. If I shoot too much, then I have so many pictures. So the interview with a fashion desirner here in DPR a few months ago stated the obvious: delete like a maniac! I realized I wasn't. And then, after months a light popped up in my head: I am trying to please others, cover some memories for others, and also try to get some shots that are more than the moment; special and an select. So the solution wasn't easy to think but obvious afterwards:

1) SHOOT A LOT

2) Don't be shy of AF-C

3) Don't worry if it's bad

4) Do relentless hyper fast culling, maybe go about the images and only keep the best that might relate to something

5) Select all the snapshots (all those that I wouldn't keep except for ...OTHERS or that others may value

6) Export all to jpg without much post processing, only what they want: resize 1/4, sharpen 200 0.5, vibrnce 5%, etc. No cropping, no nothing else. Only NR when necesary. Something that takes 15 minutes at most.

7) batch export all those to a jpg folder and share it

8) Go back and delete all these RAWS forever

9) Start the KEEPER process

a) If in doubt, delete

b) If blurry even if useful resized but still blurry, delete

c) if similar to another, decide which one, and the other DELETE

d) if nice but unclean (someone crossed behind and is distracting a bit DELETE.

e) If it's awesome but something stands out as itching my back, DELETE

f) If it has nothing special, just looks good, DELETE

g) f the color looks dull, DELETE

h) If there are distracting cables, etc. and are not part of the feature, DELETE

i) If for whatever reason, a series of photos seems to want to stay...ie. many in a series that are small variants make it hard to delete any, keep all for now and move on. Come back later.

j) If it was a quite a good shot but very compromised, like an Aquarium and dirty glass, DELETE

k) Find any additional reason to DELETE and see what else you can DELETE.

l) Count. If not a paid work, and you still have 50 pictures, continue to DELETE. Which one is less interesting? DELETE IT.

J) Also, even if it's the only photo of something, a landmark, a person, and it's the best. If it's not great DELETE. DELEEEETE (this part is hard).

10) Then move all those to a keepers folders. Don't worry if you can process them right now. You are done for the day.

I say this in second partson ("you") but of course this is how I write it. I found out that the more DELETE thinking WHY I need to delete it, I learn something. I learn NOTHING from not deleting. Finding a reason to keep a photo is very easy. Since I had created lower res jpg verions of all snapshots or pics that may interest someone else, what's left is only what I want and to be keep for no other reason.

Back to the topic: this way, I can shoot happily. I found I needed very fast culling. I use FatRawViewer. I learned all the keyboard shortcuts. After I am done with all the a to j deleting, I will still do some additional deleting in RawTherapy.

So at first, aim for quanity, and in culling aim for cuality. If you are thinking more than 10 seconds if a photo should be keeper, move to the next or, ideally, just delete it. DELETE. Try to think and state in loud voice, "I am deleting it because ..."

The more I shoot and the more I delete,  the faster I learn about why I delete, and the more I DELETE MENTALY NEXT TIME before shooting. So as you go about this ...

It doesn't matter how many photos you take. I think it's the wrong metric to focus on. I think it's most important to accept most photos should be shared, separate from your own process, and for you, most important, is to be very picky...very few pictures should remain after culling. Maybe 9 out of 10 should be deleted. and the idea is to increase the quality threshold, and see if you can increase the number of keepers.

Basically: shot with confidence. The times I did this I got the best of it. On a performing arts show, the photographer failed to show up and someone picked me from the audience and asked me to cover it and begged me. I did about 3500 shots. And in a birthday party I may shoot 200 to 300. But in reality, I think I could do 500 to 100, share 40, and keep 10 to 4.

gary0319
gary0319 Veteran Member • Posts: 6,710
Rodeo
2

Bronc Riding, Bull dogging, Calf Roping, Team Roping, Bull Riding.

Over a 2 hour Rodeo, I’ll shoot 2500 images at 15 frames per second to get the exact moment that the rider’s hat hits the dirt (below).

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tony field Forum Pro • Posts: 10,359
Re: Rodeo
4

gary0319 wrote:

Bronc Riding, Bull dogging, Calf Roping, Team Roping, Bull Riding.

Over a 2 hour Rodeo, I’ll shoot 2500 images at 15 frames per second to get the exact moment that the rider’s hat hits the dirt (below).

Indeed an excellent shot.

Personally though I am not a rodeo shooter by any stretch (my preference is strongly for show jumping which is very much a different appreciation of the horse and rider) when I do have the opportunity to shoot a rodeo I shoot single frame and rely on timing to get the images that I want. I am not a fan of motor drive for sports.

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Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 15,103
Re: Sports Events . . .

TacticDesigns wrote:

Mark_A wrote:

That is a lot of images, what is your workflow in post?

It is actually pretty quick.

I shoot JPG in order to get more shots in the buffer, so I aim to have as close to SOOC images as possible. Not completely possible because I am shooting manual exposure and the flicker of the lights is picked up by the high shutter speed. And the uneven spread of lights on the apparatus / floor means there is going to be slight variation throughout a routine.

Aha, yes shooting jpeg removes some steps indeed.

While I am waiting for the next athlete(s) to compete, I preview the images on the back of my camera and "write-protect" the "keepers". That way my "keepers" are already selected before I get home.

At the end of the day, I back-up all the images, but only load the "keepers" (write-protected images) into Lightroom.

So is that the dos write protect that you are doing? I didn't even realise you could do that in camera.

While importing into Lightroom I have Lightroom rename the file so the date+time is put at the beginning of the filename. That way, down the line, if I need to know which competition a photo was taken at, I just need to look at the date. And if shooting with two or more cameras, it puts all the images from all the cameras in chronological order.

Aha yes good thing for multiple cameras I hadn't thought of that.

Mark_A

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 15,103
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

davesurrey wrote:

Simple...it's always at airshows when i shoot multi-burst. But the keep ratio is naturally low.

Hi Dave, from your location I assume the Farnborough Air Show and perhaps Duxford? I used to live in Frimley

Mark_A

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 15,103
Re: Macro/Close-up

BBbuilder467 wrote:

It's easy to take 300 to 400 shots in an hour or so. It can take a dozen or more just to get the precise framing and focus point. If there is even the slightest hint of a breeze, your hit rate goes down.

I don't think I have ever shot 3-400 images per hour but that is why I started this thread, to find out what other people think is normal. Perhaps I am taking too few images and could be shooting more to get more keepers!

Mark_A

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 15,103
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

threw the lens wrote:

Some international sports days are very long, and it is common to rack up over 5000.

Mind you, I actually like taking these photos and know what I am looking for. Someone who doesn't like it and doesn't have a clue about the sport might only take 500. Who knows. I don't ask anybody else how many photos they take, I only care about what I am doing. If you criticised the photos I took, I would probably ignore you.

Hi threw the lens, who is criticising, I am just interested in what people think is normal for them in their circumstances.

However, you and the other posters that shoot in the thousands a day, I suppose you are burning through your shutter lifespan faster also apart from other wear and tear.

Have you gone past your shutter expected life span on your cameras at any point?

I delete obviously OOF shots at the venue in the odd moments but rarely have to at home. I process the few I want other people to see, and about the same number mainly for me.

I use PhotoMechanic to see my thumbnails because it's the fastest game in town.

Never heard of PhotoMechanic before.

It would be cute to claim I'm so faultless with WB and so in demand that I only have time to use jpeg, but the fact is that sometimes I enjoy going back to PP my images, so I use raw+jpeg. Yikes!

You must have large memory cards I am assuming?

Mark_A

Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 15,103
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

BillyBobSenna wrote:

I shoot for a few different outlets. Photography is a weekend job/hobby.

So, you will probably know this Bill, I was at the Le Mans 24 hour with my camera some years ago and there was a pro shooter in the early morning light shooting at a corner with an assistant standing 10 yards to their left with a radio flash that they were panning with the cars, his camera would fire the flash. Seemed an odd technique, what do you think of that?

For most events, I need to provide specific photos within minutes of the end of an event (race start, winner on track, victory podium), the remainder of the shots are required late the same day. In all, I typically provide about 300 photos by the end of a race day. Off season and years later, I will select and process many of the other shots from a weekend.

So I am guessing you have a laptop with you at the circuit do you only download the key images - it must take a while, my card reader only loads at 16mbps

It certainly sounds like you are organised Bill, have to be I suppose for your requirements.

I download, select, and crop photos in Photo Mechanic. Once photos are selected, I drag into Lightroom and use several of the Lightroom presets I have created to speed up the processing.

Second volume shooter in this thread who mentioned Photo Mechanic.

Did you ever shoot the US battle of the twins motorcycle racing?

Mark_A

DeathArrow Senior Member • Posts: 2,313
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?
1

Mark_A wrote:

What about you? where how many and why?

Mark_A

I shoot like a madman at sporting events and at airshows. At the last airshow I shot 2500 images in 6 hours. That's because half of time I was taking cover from the sun, eating and drinking beer. And I didn't have more cards with me.

I also shoot much when I am shooting photojournalistic type of events or other events.

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BillyBobSenna
BillyBobSenna Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

Mark_A wrote:

BillyBobSenna wrote:

I shoot for a few different outlets. Photography is a weekend job/hobby.

So, you will probably know this Bill, I was at the Le Mans 24 hour with my camera some years ago and there was a pro shooter in the early morning light shooting at a corner with an assistant standing 10 yards to their left with a radio flash that they were panning with the cars, his camera would fire the flash. Seemed an odd technique, what do you think of that?

For most events, I need to provide specific photos within minutes of the end of an event (race start, winner on track, victory podium), the remainder of the shots are required late the same day. In all, I typically provide about 300 photos by the end of a race day. Off season and years later, I will select and process many of the other shots from a weekend.

So I am guessing you have a laptop with you at the circuit do you only download the key images - it must take a while, my card reader only loads at 16mbps

I perform 2-3 downloads per day. USB3 and XQD cards are very fast so downloading doesn't take very long. There is a media center at every major track to work.

It certainly sounds like you are organised Bill, have to be I suppose for your requirements.

I download, select, and crop photos in Photo Mechanic. Once photos are selected, I drag into Lightroom and use several of the Lightroom presets I have created to speed up the processing.

Second volume shooter in this thread who mentioned Photo Mechanic.

Did you ever shoot the US battle of the twins motorcycle racing?

Actually I have never heard of this series. I have shot MotoAmerica, MotoGP, flat track, and vintage.

Mark_A

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Bill - Beverly Hills, MI
Motorsports Photography
www.billgulkerphotography.com

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Mark_A
OP Mark_A Forum Pro • Posts: 15,103
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?

BillyBobSenna wrote:

Mark_A wrote:

Did you ever shoot the US battle of the twins motorcycle racing?

Actually I have never heard of this series. I have shot MotoAmerica, MotoGP, flat track, and vintage

I may be mistaken there is one here in the UK. I had a friend who raced a Moto guzzi at Laguna seca one time but I don't know what the series was.

Mark_A

gary0319
gary0319 Veteran Member • Posts: 6,710
Re: Rodeo

tony field wrote:

gary0319 wrote:

Bronc Riding, Bull dogging, Calf Roping, Team Roping, Bull Riding.

Over a 2 hour Rodeo, I’ll shoot 2500 images at 15 frames per second to get the exact moment that the rider’s hat hits the dirt (below).

Indeed an excellent shot.

Personally though I am not a rodeo shooter by any stretch (my preference is strongly for show jumping which is very much a different appreciation of the horse and rider) when I do have the opportunity to shoot a rodeo I shoot single frame and rely on timing to get the images that I want. I am not a fan of motor drive for sports.

Good catch..

I have a certain amount of admiration for those that can get a single capture at exactly the right moment in the action. But.... I often wonder how they can be certain that the image that might have been taken a split second, before or after, might not have been the better one. 15 or 20 frames per second kind of eliminates that uncertainty, at least for me.

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richiebee
richiebee Veteran Member • Posts: 3,896
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?
1

Mark_A wrote:

Me too, it isn't that I lose interest but it just takes so long. I guess I haven't got the right workflow for lots of images and often when I process I am doing it for the web.

Yes, I think its easy to get bogged down when you have too many images to work with. It still happens to me from time to time, but much less than it used to.

It sounds as if you are quite expert with Lightroom and I understand what you mean about sets of images.

I don't think I'm an expert.  I have established a workflow, but I still have struggles - mostly with consistent white balance!

Great that you have managed to keep it as a hobby also, I think many people don't manage to do that.

I wonder if that might be more to do with photography not typically being a 9-5, than the job itself.  I'm salaried staff and while I do occasional out of hours stuff, most of it's during typical office hours. Equipment is provided, as is retirement and medical benefits. I don't have to do any selling, or networking to get business, or spend countless evenings editing to meet deadlines or deal with bridezillas. So its easy for me to separate work from pleasure. We all typically do something in our day job that we don't enjoy, and I'm no exception, but I love most of what I do, and it really helps to keep it alive as a hobby as well as a job. The pay somewhat reflects the normally low pressure of the job, but its the same as what I got as a technologist (exactly the same grade), and I'm much happier doing this - its certainly not terrible. I don't have a mortgage or any debts to speak of, my retirement savings is in decent shape, and I've never been motivated by huge sums of money.  Happiness is way more important to me.  I love the daily challenge of the uniqueness of every job I do, and am genuinely interested in the stories I hear from the people I photograph. My only slight concern is that it lasts another 13 years until I'm ready to retire.  That could be a challenge, though right now there's no shortage of work.

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fuji101 Regular Member • Posts: 213
Re: At what events / occasions did you shoot the most images?
2

College Baseball and Hot Air Balloon Rally.

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TacticDesigns
TacticDesigns Veteran Member • Posts: 6,432
Re: Sports Events . . .
1

Mark_A wrote:

TacticDesigns wrote:

Mark_A wrote:

That is a lot of images, what is your workflow in post?

It is actually pretty quick.

I shoot JPG in order to get more shots in the buffer, so I aim to have as close to SOOC images as possible. Not completely possible because I am shooting manual exposure and the flicker of the lights is picked up by the high shutter speed. And the uneven spread of lights on the apparatus / floor means there is going to be slight variation throughout a routine.

Aha, yes shooting jpeg removes some steps indeed.

While I am waiting for the next athlete(s) to compete, I preview the images on the back of my camera and "write-protect" the "keepers". That way my "keepers" are already selected before I get home.

At the end of the day, I back-up all the images, but only load the "keepers" (write-protected images) into Lightroom.

So is that the dos write protect that you are doing? I didn't even realise you could do that in camera.

Yes.

I'm not sure if all cameras do it, but all the cameras I've had did it.

On my Nikon dSLR, when I am previewing a picture I just "protect" it.

When I copy all the files to my computer to back them up, I then do a sort on the "attributes".

In Windows it's hidden. When I open a "File Explorer" window and view the directory with its files, I have to do a "right-click" on the bar with the field titles. I then add "attributes" to the list of fields to display. And then I do a sort on "attributes". All the write-protected files get grouped together. Then I just copy those write-protected files over to another folder. Remove the write-protect. And then import into Lightroom.

EDIT: If I have time on vacation, I'll do this as well. Not a lot while camping as there is always something to be done while camping. But . . . when we take a plane or train somewhere. When my family is resting I'll pull out the cameras and make my selects. So when I get back home at least that is done.

While importing into Lightroom I have Lightroom rename the file so the date+time is put at the beginning of the filename. That way, down the line, if I need to know which competition a photo was taken at, I just need to look at the date. And if shooting with two or more cameras, it puts all the images from all the cameras in chronological order.

Aha yes good thing for multiple cameras I hadn't thought of that.

+1

Since my wife and I sometimes shot at the same time at gymnastics . . . adding date+time at the beginning of the file grouped all the shots of an athlete together so that it was easier to see all the shots of an athlete. (As long as I remembered to synchronize all camera clocks at the beginning of the day.) LOL.

I also do this for my vacation pictures, since I often shoot different cameras on vacation. For a hike, I might use my dSLR. But for a run to the beach I'll take my waterproof compact. Adding date+time to the beginning of the file means that all my vacation pictures will put themselves in chronological order.

NOTE: For vacation shots, I might not run them through Lightroom. I'll often shoot JPG on vacation. So I use NAMEXIF to add the date+time to the beginning of the filename, right in the Windows folder. And I just found another program called Bulk Rename Utility to do this.

And . . . if I copy a picture out for some reason . . . I have a way to know when a shot was taken and be able to look back on my digital family album to find the rest of the pictures.

Also . . .

It protects against the possibility that two cameras write the same file name. In which case, if I had copied those two files to the same folder, one file would be over-written and lost.

Adding the date+time to the beginning of the file, even if two cameras end up writing the images with the same file number, the chance of those two files being taken at exactly the same time is very slim, thus greatly reducing the chance of lost files.

Take care & Happy Shooting!

Mark_A

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Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,944
1st trip to Europe with a digital camera
1

I went nuts.

A friend's wedding was also right up there.

I realize I got carried away when I had to edit them; it took days and days to filter through, edit, cleanse...

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jrtrent Veteran Member • Posts: 5,283
first trip with a digital camera
1

I got my first digital camera in July of 2003, a Leica Digilux 1, and soon went to visit a friend in Boise for a few days.  In that four-day trip, I took 173 pictures.  I've never before or since taken that many shots in so short a period of time.  Went a little crazy with the shutter release, I guess, knowing that I didn't need to keep buying more film and processing mailers to continue taking pictures.  Lowest percentage of keepers, too, with only about half of them worth hanging on to.

tony field Forum Pro • Posts: 10,359
Re: Rodeo

gary0319 wrote:

tony field wrote:

gary0319 wrote:

Bronc Riding, Bull dogging, Calf Roping, Team Roping, Bull Riding.

Over a 2 hour Rodeo, I’ll shoot 2500 images at 15 frames per second to get the exact moment that the rider’s hat hits the dirt (below).

Indeed an excellent shot.

Personally though I am not a rodeo shooter by any stretch (my preference is strongly for show jumping which is very much a different appreciation of the horse and rider) when I do have the opportunity to shoot a rodeo I shoot single frame and rely on timing to get the images that I want. I am not a fan of motor drive for sports.

Good catch..

I have a certain amount of admiration for those that can get a single capture at exactly the right moment in the action. But.... I often wonder how they can be certain that the image that might have been taken a split second, before or after, might not have been the better one. 15 or 20 frames per second kind of eliminates that uncertainty, at least for me.

This is probably largely true. However all of my cameras are dslrs and have a maximum frame rate of 10 frames per second. When I relied on motor drive I found that the motor drive would pick up the shot just before peak action or just after peak action. I found that my sense of timing was better than the camera when shooting show jumping, speed skating, motorcycles, and dance.

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Charles Darwin: "ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge."
tony
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