Ebay strategies?

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,035
Re: Read the Thread

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

Mackiesback wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

The Wikipedia page on auction sniping actually covers all the logic behind this strategy:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auction_sniping

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid, otherwise, B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user. The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid. I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection, when properly deployed. BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

Exactly ... I can't see using that at all.

Of the other programs you mentioned, (where your "secret" until last second), which of those do you recommend as easiest and most reliable ???

https://www.auctionstealer.com/

I settled on this one. Click on information and choose the WinPoints, where you pay a small commission on only the auctions you win, and you get all the features of the system. There is a free version that has very few benefits, and a $10 a month version if you are a power user.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user, regardless of timeline.

 Mackiesback's gear list:Mackiesback's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon D50 Nikon D100 Nikon Df Nikon Z6 +17 more
John Michael Winterbourne
John Michael Winterbourne Senior Member • Posts: 2,779
Re: Read the Thread

Me and my stupid sense of humour... Genuinely sorry to hear that - you took some great shots with it.

 John Michael Winterbourne's gear list:John Michael Winterbourne's gear list
Olympus C-300 Zoom Fujifilm X100T Nikon D70 Nikon D80 Nikon D2X +35 more
PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,668
Re: Read the Thread

Mackiesback wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

Mackiesback wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

The Wikipedia page on auction sniping actually covers all the logic behind this strategy:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auction_sniping

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid, otherwise, B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user. The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid. I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection, when properly deployed. BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

Exactly ... I can't see using that at all.

Of the other programs you mentioned, (where your "secret" until last second), which of those do you recommend as easiest and most reliable ???

https://www.auctionstealer.com/

Thank You .... (but have a feeling I may now hate myself --- because I do NOT "need" anything anymore).

I settled on this one. Click on information and choose the WinPoints, where you pay a small commission on only the auctions you win, and you get all the features of the system. There is a free version that has very few benefits, and a $10 a month version if you are a power user.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user, regardless of timeline.

PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,668
Re: Read the Thread

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

Me and my stupid sense of humour... Genuinely sorry to hear that - you took some great shots with it.

As I had mentioned the RX10 ... I can't understand why ALL "digital" cameras don't have FA-LCD, (even dSLR as D5600 does .. but not D7500).

It allows shooting from (formerly) impossible shooting positions and angles, (w/out "guessing" at correct framing).

Even as far back as 1964 (as official photographer for Texas A&M), I once held/shot camera held out of window while following a pick-up truck w/ DOLPHIN laying in its back, and its tail hanging out.  As I recall I got the shot, but was just guessing at the (best) framing.

At age 73, I can't bend/kneel/CLIMB as easy as I once could and the FA-LCD is a life-saver for me.

OP John KM/linhof Regular Member • Posts: 341
Re: Read the Thread

As the OP I didn't realize how complicated the bidding process can be. As a buyer, and if I truly want the item for my current needs I usually place a last minute bid with the maximum I would spend. If at about 5 secs I am outbid I get a chance to raise the bid if I am quick enough. If it is for something I would like to have but don't really need I will enter my bid with its maximum earlier and forget about it.

As a seller I price most items at half or less of the typical sold price, so if someone really wants the item there will be interest at that price and maybe multiple bidders will bring the bid close to the typical sold price. If not I am happy to part with item at the opening bid price, particularly if the item is not being used by me.

I guess if you are re-seller and a business things have a different look, but for those of us who view it more of a hobby, then you have to take the losses along with the wins both as a buyer and a seller. In my experience (20+ years) it evens out over the long run. But I am an optimist even at the age of 75! Your results may be differrent.

-- hide signature --

Linhofbiker

 John KM/linhof's gear list:John KM/linhof's gear list
Sony Alpha DSLR-A850 Fujifilm X-Pro1 Fujifilm X-E1
PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,668
PLEASE ... someone STOP ME !!!

Just for fun, I often switch over to "Ending Soon" items ...

It is often amazing how low some items are (soon/immediately) selling for, and admit I also very often jump in and grab a "value", (unfortunately even if I don't need it).

PLEASE someone STOP ME ... I have no more room in my garage (or girlfriend's house's) !!!

BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 1,872
Snipping Program

I stand corrected!

I never used snipping program BUT I saw it in action from a friend using it in 2015.
It might have change since then or he simply did not know how to use it. Another possibility is that my friend was using the FREE version.

You did not cover the incremental bid of Snipe software. Is it similar to eBay?
What are the difference between the FREE version and the for PAY version?

The algorithm you described is practically identical to the autobid from eBay, specifically SET and FORGET - - - no need to monitor. As you described, Snipe is bound by the limit set by the user which is identical to Autobid.

Major difference are:
* eBay's autobid is free
* eBay's autobid is integrated. No need for installation
* Autobid is instantaneous. . . not a few second lag.
* The user does not need to notify autobid to cancel when the limit is exceeded, but the user has the option to enter another bid and new higher limit. . . .
.
How does Snipe user notified the user?
What happen if the user ignored SNIPE message?
Do the user need to run and constantly monitor the program?
.
Of course we all have our preferences. For me, I prefer to have one integrated system that is FREE, than have another (third party) specially if I have to pay extra.

Mackiesback wrote:

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,035
Re: Snipping Program

BrownieVet wrote:

I stand corrected!

I never used snipping program BUT I saw it in action from a friend using it in 2015.
It might have change since then or he simply did not know how to use it. Another possibility is that my friend was using the FREE version.

Sniping software is basically unchanged for the last 15 years. I can’t answer to your friends software because I don’t know what he was using. Nor his ability.

You did not cover the incremental bid of Snipe software. Is it similar to eBay?
What are the difference between the FREE version and the for PAY version?

I didn’t have to cover it because eBays proxy bid system works the same no matter from where the bid was placed. When you are bidding with 3 seconds to go, it’s really not an issue.

The algorithm you described is practically identical to the autobid from eBay, specifically SET and FORGET - - - no need to monitor. As you described, Snipe is bound by the limit set by the user which is identical to Autobid.

Major difference are:
* eBay's autobid is free
* eBay's autobid is integrated. No need for installation
* Autobid is instantaneous. . . not a few second lag.
* The user does not need to notify autobid to cancel when the limit is exceeded, but the user has the option to enter another bid and new higher limit. . . .

This list shows a basic misunderstanding of how sniping software works. There are no integrated issues, there is no lag, and you don’t have to cancel anything, just don’t enter a higher limit. You are giving advice in sniping software with no actual experience actually using it. Not good.

.
How does Snipe user notified the user?

email or pop up, depending on your OS.

What happen if the user ignored SNIPE message?

Nothing happens, you were outbid.

Do the user need to run and constantly monitor the program?

No

.
Of course we all have our preferences. For me, I prefer to have one integrated system that is FREE, than have another (third party) specially if I have to pay extra.

Sniping software used ebays integrated proxy system. If you prefer to get outbid by people who understand sniping systems, great. Honestly, I don’t know any serious eBay buyers who don’t snipe. It’s been that way for almost 20 years.  Paying between 20 cents and 5 dollars to win an item you want isn’t free, but really? If you are the concerned about pennies on the dollar, well.....

Mackiesback wrote:

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

 Mackiesback's gear list:Mackiesback's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon D50 Nikon D100 Nikon Df Nikon Z6 +17 more
New Day Rising
New Day Rising Senior Member • Posts: 2,952
Re: Snipping Program

BrownieVet wrote:

I stand corrected!

I never used snipping program BUT I saw it in action from a friend using it in 2015.
It might have change since then or he simply did not know how to use it. Another possibility is that my friend was using the FREE version.

You did not cover the incremental bid of Snipe software. Is it similar to eBay?

Do you mean the size of the increments? They are set by eBay and they do increase as the total value increases.

I won a lens last night. I didn't use a sniper, just put in the bid myself with about two seconds to go. The opening price was $340 and it sat there until a few minutes before the end when it went to $355, then $360, then up to $385. I originally decided my limit was $363, but I changed my mind. This of course was the emotional part at work, which sniper programs prevent, but I was comfortable that more was still good value. With two seconds to go I put in $401 and won it for that. The next highest bid - originally put in several days before, was $400.

So I won by the smallest increment. Had I put in $500 - whether manually or through a bid sniper - I would still have paid $401. Assuming the other bids were the same, that would have been the same result whether I had bid two seconds, two hours or two days before the end. The risk would have been that $400 bidder (or another) would have seen they had been outbid and put their bid up, making me lose or go higher.

What are the difference between the FREE version and the for PAY version?

I have used two or three bid snipers, only ever free (I didn't even know there were paid versions). I think paid versions let you have more snipes going at once, would be ad-free. I'm not sure about other differences.

The algorithm you described is practically identical to the autobid from eBay, specifically SET and FORGET - - - no need to monitor. As you described, Snipe is bound by the limit set by the user which is identical to Autobid.

Yes

Major difference are:
* eBay's autobid is free

True, but sniping can be free

* eBay's autobid is integrated. No need for installation

True, but understand that sniping still uses the integrated system and installation is just setting up a simple app.

* Autobid is instantaneous. . . not a few second lag.

Not sure what you mean. Do you mean when you set-up and activate the snipe? You can do this at anytime during the auction. Once set-up it will just bid at the time you select (unless there is some kind of network or server glitch, but that could also happen if you were doing it manually; I have had manual bids fail because my system was too slow).

* The user does not need to notify autobid to cancel when the limit is exceeded, but the user has the option to enter another bid and new higher limit. . . .

You can change the limit at any time before the snipe is placed. Say you set up the snipe a few days before and decide your maximum is $500. You then decide the next day that you are comfortable paying up to $550. Just change it in the app (you can change it directly in eBay in the same way, but that potentially becomes visible to other bidders - fi someone places a maximum bid of, say, $520 the price will suddenly jump up to that, then instantly to your bid at $525 or whatever the increment is).

You can cancel the snipe at anytime if you change your mind about buying the item, find another one in the meantime or whatever. Just deactivate the snipe. It is more cumbersome to cancel if you have already put your maximum bid directly into eBay.

.
How does Snipe user notified the user?

It will notify you of the outcome once the snipe bid has been placed. That might be advise that your snipe was successful (which usually means you won, but not if another bid higher than yours comes in after - eg, if you set-up your snipe to bid with 5 seconds to go, but someone else put on a higher one at 3 seconds to go). Or it might advise you it was unsuccessful (eg,because bidding had exceeded your maximum in the meantime).

What happen if the user ignored SNIPE message?

Nothing, because usually you have set-up the snipe too late to do anything else. If you set it up for, say, one minute from the end you could see it had failed and you might be able to sneak in another bid before the end if you wanted (but that kind of defeats the purpose).

Do the user need to run and constantly monitor the program?

No. The whole idea is to set and forget. The programs are really useful if you know you will be asleep or away from your computer/device or doing something else at the time the auction ends - just set the snipe at any time and check later to see whether you won or not.

.
Of course we all have our preferences. For me, I prefer to have one integrated system that is FREE, than have another (third party) specially if I have to pay extra.

Mackiesback wrote:

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

 New Day Rising's gear list:New Day Rising's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro Nikon D50 Canon EOS 550D Fujifilm X-T1 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G II +4 more
Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,035
Re: Snipping Program

New Day Rising wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I stand corrected!

I never used snipping program BUT I saw it in action from a friend using it in 2015.
It might have change since then or he simply did not know how to use it. Another possibility is that my friend was using the FREE version.

You did not cover the incremental bid of Snipe software. Is it similar to eBay?

Do you mean the size of the increments? They are set by eBay and they do increase as the total value increases.

I won a lens last night. I didn't use a sniper, just put in the bid myself with about two seconds to go. The opening price was $340 and it sat there until a few minutes before the end when it went to $355, then $360, then up to $385. I originally decided my limit was $363, but I changed my mind. This of course was the emotional part at work, which sniper programs prevent, but I was comfortable that more was still good value. With two seconds to go I put in $401 and won it for that. The next highest bid - originally put in several days before, was $400.

So I won by the smallest increment. Had I put in $500 - whether manually or through a bid sniper - I would still have paid $401. Assuming the other bids were the same, that would have been the same result whether I had bid two seconds, two hours or two days before the end. The risk would have been that $400 bidder (or another) would have seen they had been outbid and put their bid up, making me lose or go higher.

This is a perfect example to the advantages of sniping. If all of your competition for this lens were snipers, you would have never known about their interest in this lens, and you would have never had the chance to talk yourself into raising your max from $363 to $401. In short, you would have lost this auction.

What are the difference between the FREE version and the for PAY version?

I have used two or three bid snipers, only ever free (I didn't even know there were paid versions). I think paid versions let you have more snipes going at once, would be ad-free. I'm not sure about other differences.

Many offer a free version with limited notifications, and a bid with 10 seconds to go. And you are correct, a limit to the number of snipes per month. The paid versions offer bids with 3 seconds to go with many other controls and features. I have never seen a paid version over $10 per month. A number easily recovered in one successful snipe.

The algorithm you described is practically identical to the autobid from eBay, specifically SET and FORGET - - - no need to monitor. As you described, Snipe is bound by the limit set by the user which is identical to Autobid.

Yes

Major difference are:
* eBay's autobid is free

True, but sniping can be free

* eBay's autobid is integrated. No need for installation

True, but understand that sniping still uses the integrated system and installation is just setting up a simple app.

* Autobid is instantaneous. . . not a few second lag.

Not sure what you mean. Do you mean when you set-up and activate the snipe? You can do this at anytime during the auction. Once set-up it will just bid at the time you select (unless there is some kind of network or server glitch, but that could also happen if you were doing it manually; I have had manual bids fail because my system was too slow).

* The user does not need to notify autobid to cancel when the limit is exceeded, but the user has the option to enter another bid and new higher limit. . . .

You can change the limit at any time before the snipe is placed. Say you set up the snipe a few days before and decide your maximum is $500. You then decide the next day that you are comfortable paying up to $550. Just change it in the app (you can change it directly in eBay in the same way, but that potentially becomes visible to other bidders - fi someone places a maximum bid of, say, $520 the price will suddenly jump up to that, then instantly to your bid at $525 or whatever the increment is).

You can cancel the snipe at anytime if you change your mind about buying the item, find another one in the meantime or whatever. Just deactivate the snipe. It is more cumbersome to cancel if you have already put your maximum bid directly into eBay.

All correct.

.
How does Snipe user notified the user?

It will notify you of the outcome once the snipe bid has been placed. That might be advise that your snipe was successful (which usually means you won, but not if another bid higher than yours comes in after - eg, if you set-up your snipe to bid with 5 seconds to go, but someone else put on a higher one at 3 seconds to go). Or it might advise you it was unsuccessful (eg,because bidding had exceeded your maximum in the meantime).

Normally the paid versions will also notify you if someone has already outbid your max, even if it is days before the auction ends. This is the most effective form of monitoring auctions and not available through eBay.

What happen if the user ignored SNIPE message?

Nothing, because usually you have set-up the snipe too late to do anything else. If you set it up for, say, one minute from the end you could see it had failed and you might be able to sneak in another bid before the end if you wanted (but that kind of defeats the purpose).

Do the user need to run and constantly monitor the program?

No. The whole idea is to set and forget. The programs are really useful if you know you will be asleep or away from your computer/device or doing something else at the time the auction ends - just set the snipe at any time and check later to see whether you won or not.

.
Of course we all have our preferences. For me, I prefer to have one integrated system that is FREE, than have another (third party) specially if I have to pay extra.

Mackiesback wrote:

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

For what it's worth, nobody here is trying to sell people on sniping systems. If Brownie prefers ebay's system and that is his comfort zone, that's great. But there has been some fundamental misinformation about how sniping programs work that needs to be clarified for people that ARE interested in this very effective technology.

There is a reason these programs are plentiful, it's because they work. I also think they are largely responsible for the number of sellers going to buy-it-now pricing models.

 Mackiesback's gear list:Mackiesback's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon D50 Nikon D100 Nikon Df Nikon Z6 +17 more
New Day Rising
New Day Rising Senior Member • Posts: 2,952
Re: Snipping Program

Mackiesback wrote:

New Day Rising wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I stand corrected!

I never used snipping program BUT I saw it in action from a friend using it in 2015.
It might have change since then or he simply did not know how to use it. Another possibility is that my friend was using the FREE version.

You did not cover the incremental bid of Snipe software. Is it similar to eBay?

Do you mean the size of the increments? They are set by eBay and they do increase as the total value increases.

I won a lens last night. I didn't use a sniper, just put in the bid myself with about two seconds to go. The opening price was $340 and it sat there until a few minutes before the end when it went to $355, then $360, then up to $385. I originally decided my limit was $363, but I changed my mind. This of course was the emotional part at work, which sniper programs prevent, but I was comfortable that more was still good value. With two seconds to go I put in $401 and won it for that. The next highest bid - originally put in several days before, was $400.

So I won by the smallest increment. Had I put in $500 - whether manually or through a bid sniper - I would still have paid $401. Assuming the other bids were the same, that would have been the same result whether I had bid two seconds, two hours or two days before the end. The risk would have been that $400 bidder (or another) would have seen they had been outbid and put their bid up, making me lose or go higher.

This is a perfect example to the advantages of sniping. If all of your competition for this lens were snipers, you would have never known about their interest in this lens, and you would have never had the chance to talk yourself into raising your max from $363 to $401. In short, you would have lost this auction.

What are the difference between the FREE version and the for PAY version?

I have used two or three bid snipers, only ever free (I didn't even know there were paid versions). I think paid versions let you have more snipes going at once, would be ad-free. I'm not sure about other differences.

Many offer a free version with limited notifications, and a bid with 10 seconds to go. And you are correct, a limit to the number of snipes per month. The paid versions offer bids with 3 seconds to go with many other controls and features. I have never seen a paid version over $10 per month. A number easily recovered in one successful snipe.

I use one called Myibidder Auction Sniper from the Google Play store (Android). It's free and has bid times of 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 seconds. It has won me plenty of auctions, including some real bargains.

The algorithm you described is practically identical to the autobid from eBay, specifically SET and FORGET - - - no need to monitor. As you described, Snipe is bound by the limit set by the user which is identical to Autobid.

Yes

Major difference are:
* eBay's autobid is free

True, but sniping can be free

* eBay's autobid is integrated. No need for installation

True, but understand that sniping still uses the integrated system and installation is just setting up a simple app.

* Autobid is instantaneous. . . not a few second lag.

Not sure what you mean. Do you mean when you set-up and activate the snipe? You can do this at anytime during the auction. Once set-up it will just bid at the time you select (unless there is some kind of network or server glitch, but that could also happen if you were doing it manually; I have had manual bids fail because my system was too slow).

* The user does not need to notify autobid to cancel when the limit is exceeded, but the user has the option to enter another bid and new higher limit. . . .

You can change the limit at any time before the snipe is placed. Say you set up the snipe a few days before and decide your maximum is $500. You then decide the next day that you are comfortable paying up to $550. Just change it in the app (you can change it directly in eBay in the same way, but that potentially becomes visible to other bidders - fi someone places a maximum bid of, say, $520 the price will suddenly jump up to that, then instantly to your bid at $525 or whatever the increment is).

You can cancel the snipe at anytime if you change your mind about buying the item, find another one in the meantime or whatever. Just deactivate the snipe. It is more cumbersome to cancel if you have already put your maximum bid directly into eBay.

All correct.

.
How does Snipe user notified the user?

It will notify you of the outcome once the snipe bid has been placed. That might be advise that your snipe was successful (which usually means you won, but not if another bid higher than yours comes in after - eg, if you set-up your snipe to bid with 5 seconds to go, but someone else put on a higher one at 3 seconds to go). Or it might advise you it was unsuccessful (eg,because bidding had exceeded your maximum in the meantime).

Normally the paid versions will also notify you if someone has already outbid your max, even if it is days before the auction ends. This is the most effective form of monitoring auctions and not available through eBay.

My free sniper doesn't do that - that is a good feature.

What happen if the user ignored SNIPE message?

Nothing, because usually you have set-up the snipe too late to do anything else. If you set it up for, say, one minute from the end you could see it had failed and you might be able to sneak in another bid before the end if you wanted (but that kind of defeats the purpose).

Do the user need to run and constantly monitor the program?

No. The whole idea is to set and forget. The programs are really useful if you know you will be asleep or away from your computer/device or doing something else at the time the auction ends - just set the snipe at any time and check later to see whether you won or not.

.
Of course we all have our preferences. For me, I prefer to have one integrated system that is FREE, than have another (third party) specially if I have to pay extra.

Mackiesback wrote:

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

For what it's worth, nobody here is trying to sell people on sniping systems. If Brownie prefers ebay's system and that is his comfort zone, that's great. But there has been some fundamental misinformation about how sniping programs work that needs to be clarified for people that ARE interested in this very effective technology.

There is a reason these programs are plentiful, it's because they work. I also think they are largely responsible for the number of sellers going to buy-it-now pricing models.

 New Day Rising's gear list:New Day Rising's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro Nikon D50 Canon EOS 550D Fujifilm X-T1 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G II +4 more
Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,035
Re: Snipping Program

I never actually considered app based programs, all my commentary previous is on web based versions. I actually hadn't thought of app based ones because I don't shop on my phone. I am ios but I may have to sniff around. Thanks.

 Mackiesback's gear list:Mackiesback's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon D50 Nikon D100 Nikon Df Nikon Z6 +17 more
OP John KM/linhof Regular Member • Posts: 341
Re: PLEASE ... someone STOP ME !!!

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

Just for fun, I often switch over to "Ending Soon" items ...

It is often amazing how low some items are (soon/immediately) selling for, and admit I also very often jump in and grab a "value", (unfortunately even if I don't need it).

PLEASE someone STOP ME ... I have no more room in my garage (or girlfriend's house's) !!!

I do the same thing. Sometimes you do find some "good deals" this way especially if the seller has made a mistake in the title and/or doesn't know what they have in terms of value. I found some good Minolta Maxxum lenses this way. The seller was listing a Minolta 7000 with lenses (not specified). The pictures showed two lenses I could use, the 50mm macro and a 24mm. Now I have yet another Minolta Maxxum 7000 for my collection, having often bought a Maxxum 7000 for the attached lens.

This approach has its downside particularly late at night when unable to sleep. I have several times ended up with some cheap junk from China that I didn't need just because it was a bargain.

-- hide signature --

Linhofbiker

 John KM/linhof's gear list:John KM/linhof's gear list
Sony Alpha DSLR-A850 Fujifilm X-Pro1 Fujifilm X-E1
Daggilarr
Daggilarr Regular Member • Posts: 295
Re: Not true; I often get such high bids from overseas buyers who cannot buy locally. (nt)
1

For buying use a sniper. For selling BIN or best offer.  Good pictures a decent amount of description, not just stuff cut and pasted. Strong reassurance of good packaging and fast delivery.

 Daggilarr's gear list:Daggilarr's gear list
Sony a6000 Sony E 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 PZ OSS Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS
CMCM Senior Member • Posts: 4,791
Re: Ebay strategies?

Kung Fu wrote:

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

I think it's interesting that your thread about "Ebay strategies" contains so much about buyers' strategies, and very little about selling strategy. That's a pity, because I may also be about to start selling photography stuff again on the bay, after a couple of years away and reading a lot of negative stuff on here from frustrated sellers, I was hoping to get a few helpful ideas. Disappointed so far.

I've read most about "the NAD scam" - it took me an embarrassingly long time to work out that means "Not As Described" - and I think the best starting point to counter that is to use really good photos in the listing, with serial numbers and other identifying features.

eBay, when reviewing your dispute, will not even look at your photos or description. They don’t care. Buyer says “not as described” = you lose. Period. And the refund money is withdrawn from your linked bank account and sent to the seller immediately, and without your express authorization.

Also look up the “chargeback” scam. That happened to me too.

This would at least mean that it behoves the seller to be as accurate as possible in the description.  And that's a good thing.  That said, I'm sure there are buyers who abuse the system.

 CMCM's gear list:CMCM's gear list
Fujifilm X30 Nikon Coolpix P900 Canon G7 X II Nikon D700 Nikon D5600 +14 more
COYQ Senior Member • Posts: 2,045
Re: Ebay strategies?

If you're selling a common item that is easily available from other ebay sellers then list it with a buy it now price, undercut the others if you just want to sell it quickly.

For anything else go the auction route. Although it can be a little risky I have found I get the best prices when I list stuff at 99p start price and no reserve.

Generally items will go for what they're worth, or a bit more if people get into a bidding war, which is when you get the best prices. I've done it myself, bid more than I should just because I want to win the auction!

Good photos and descriptions are important.

bolt2014
bolt2014 Regular Member • Posts: 200
Re: Ebay strategies?

I never bid on an item that has a reserve unless the seller will tell me what the reserve is.

-- hide signature --

Shoot photos not camera brands!

 bolt2014's gear list:bolt2014's gear list
A3000 Nikon D5500 Nikon D7200 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Sigma 19mm F2.8 DN | A +7 more
bolt2014
bolt2014 Regular Member • Posts: 200
Re: Ebay strategies?

I have to add that I don't think there are many bargains on Ebay anymore. That especially holds true for vintage audio gear where starting and buy it now prices are as high as some really top of the line current gear. Why should I take a chance on a 45-50 year old receiver or amplifier that might die two days after I receive it when I can buy new and have a warranty? To a lesser extent  the same holds true for camera gear.

-- hide signature --

Shoot photos not camera brands!

 bolt2014's gear list:bolt2014's gear list
A3000 Nikon D5500 Nikon D7200 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Sigma 19mm F2.8 DN | A +7 more
FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 11,067
Re: Ebay strategies?
1

bolt2014 wrote:

I have to add that I don't think there are many bargains on Ebay anymore. That especially holds true for vintage audio gear where starting and buy it now prices are as high as some really top of the line current gear. Why should I take a chance on a 45-50 year old receiver or amplifier that might die two days after I receive it when I can buy new and have a warranty? To a lesser extent the same holds true for camera gear.

Maybe the reason there are fewer bargains to be had is because more people are aware of EBay and are confident buying from it.

That to me sounds like good news for the sellers or if you like , it proves EBay is more popular than ever.

Jonsi
Jonsi Veteran Member • Posts: 4,487
Re: Ebay strategies?
1

bolt2014 wrote:

I never bid on an item that has a reserve unless the seller will tell me what the reserve is.

Why...?

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads