Ebay strategies?

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 1,872
Re: Read the Thread

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

The OP is about eBay Strategy. Honestly, what does that mean to you?

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

Autobid is a computer program (app) free service offered by eBay for free. Please read the entire thread between PhotoTeach and myself.

I'm not sure if my point was made clear. You and PhotoTeach aren't talking exactly about the same thing. You are talking about autobid (eBay's built in function) or in combination with a computer program/app that does sniping (last second bids).

Let us define the terms:
Autobid - eBays automated "computer" program - interactive response
Snipper - Third Party "computer" program. Monitors only - requires user action

The scenario I'm talking about (and I believe PhotoTeach was talking about) goes more like this.

Say for example A's max bid is $90 (set either in eBay or in a sniper program/app). Your (B) max bid is $100.

A enters $90 in to eBay earlier in the auction as max bid (the visible current bid amount would be lower due to eBay's autobid system). B enters $100 at last moment (either manually or sniper program/app does) too late to allow a human response to eBay's notification that A must increase max bid to win. B wins the auction at $91.

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.  
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%,  someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330  not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid,  otherwise,  B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user.  The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid.  I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection,  when properly deployed.  BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user,  regardless of timeline.

GohanX Forum Member • Posts: 98
Re: Your strategy looks (mostly) good
1

Smaug01 wrote:

I can list something for a reasonable fixed price, allow offers, (many will be ridiculous) without the option for some cheapskate to place a bid and blast that fixed price. (as with Buy it Now, above) Or, I can list it at a bargain price, (but which I'd still be OK with) and no option to make lowball offers.

Bottom Line: Don't plan on your bidders being dumb. Plan on them researching and coming to the conclusion that your stuff is the best deal. Don't try to satisfy the guys who are looking for bargain basement.

Don't forget that you can also add the option to auto reject offers below a certain amount. It's a lifesaver if you have a popular item.

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Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,841
Re: How could this happen? Was no reserve set? eBay 101 continues.
1

Corkcampbell wrote:

How could this (below) happen? Was no reserve set? Doesn't really make a difference what the bidding starts at, as long as a proper reserve is set. Allowing low bidding allows some to make a low bid just to keep the auction on their possible purchase list.

"Starting the bidding super low, as you mentioned can get you burned. I tried that recently and overestimated the interest in the item, so someone got a $100 (new) luggage rack for $4 + shipping. I should have started it at a low price, but not a "grab my ankles" price."

Yes, no reserve. Bidders don't like reserves at all; it's perceived as playing games.

There's no point in starting the bidding at $1 if you're going to have a reserve. That's just assuming people are stupid. Plus, I hate getting all those: "what is your reserve?" messages.

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*********
"Rudeness is the weak person's imitation of strength."

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JakeJY Senior Member • Posts: 3,609
Re: Read the Thread

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

The Wikipedia page on auction sniping actually covers all the logic behind this strategy:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auction_sniping

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid, otherwise, B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user. The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid. I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection, when properly deployed. BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user, regardless of timeline.

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markyboy81 Senior Member • Posts: 2,458
Re: Ebay strategies?

My eBay strategy is to avoid eBay wherever possible, due to extortionate fees as a seller, and buyers trying to pull a fast one.

But it's hard to avoid it sometimes as for certain products it's the only way to sell. What I generally do is exploit eBay by using it to advertise my listing, then ask potential buyers to contact me directly and we both win because of savings to the fees. I know it's against the rules but you'd be surprised how often it works - it's obviously more successful if you have lots of good feedback.

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Jonsi
Jonsi Veteran Member • Posts: 4,501
Re: Read the Thread

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

The OP is about eBay Strategy. Honestly, what does that mean to you?

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

Autobid is a computer program (app) free service offered by eBay for free. Please read the entire thread between PhotoTeach and myself.

I'm not sure if my point was made clear. You and PhotoTeach aren't talking exactly about the same thing. You are talking about autobid (eBay's built in function) or in combination with a computer program/app that does sniping (last second bids).

Let us define the terms:
Autobid - eBays automated "computer" program - interactive response
Snipper - Third Party "computer" program. Monitors only - requires user action

The scenario I'm talking about (and I believe PhotoTeach was talking about) goes more like this.

Say for example A's max bid is $90 (set either in eBay or in a sniper program/app). Your (B) max bid is $100.

A enters $90 in to eBay earlier in the auction as max bid (the visible current bid amount would be lower due to eBay's autobid system). B enters $100 at last moment (either manually or sniper program/app does) too late to allow a human response to eBay's notification that A must increase max bid to win. B wins the auction at $91.

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.

You only have to enter the $423.02.  You don't have to bid twice.

Jonsi
Jonsi Veteran Member • Posts: 4,501
Re: Read the Thread

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

I think his point is that if someone is willing to pay more, they can have it.

Here:

"Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline."

I'm typically the same way. I just enter my max upfront, and I either win or I lose.

For more important, or hard-to-find items, I am often there at the end of the auction.  Depending on time of day.

PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,680
Re: Read the Thread

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

The OP is about eBay Strategy. Honestly, what does that mean to you?

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

Autobid is a computer program (app) free service offered by eBay for free. Please read the entire thread between PhotoTeach and myself.

I'm not sure if my point was made clear. You and PhotoTeach aren't talking exactly about the same thing. You are talking about autobid (eBay's built in function) or in combination with a computer program/app that does sniping (last second bids).

Let us define the terms:
Autobid - eBays automated "computer" program - interactive response
Snipper - Third Party "computer" program. Monitors only - requires user action

The scenario I'm talking about (and I believe PhotoTeach was talking about) goes more like this.

Say for example A's max bid is $90 (set either in eBay or in a sniper program/app). Your (B) max bid is $100.

A enters $90 in to eBay earlier in the auction as max bid (the visible current bid amount would be lower due to eBay's autobid system). B enters $100 at last moment (either manually or sniper program/app does) too late to allow a human response to eBay's notification that A must increase max bid to win. B wins the auction at $91.

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid, otherwise, B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user. The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid. I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection, when properly deployed. BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user, regardless of timeline.

I would'nt (dont) ever do that. You are begging to be outbid, or pay more if you do get it.

Except for (often) forgetting the closing time, I get 90% of what I want at only $1-5 above initial listing price.

Kung Fu
Kung Fu Senior Member • Posts: 3,637
Re: Ebay strategies?
2

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

That doesn't tally with the research I did into it a week or so ago. One of the key points I think was to respond in a timely fashion offering a return/full refund and then take it from there. I'll do more research before I start any sales. But I don't believe it's as simple as "buyer claims NAD and that's the end of it ".

I said in a dispute. If they ask for a return, and you grant them one immediately, there’s no dispute, is there?

In my case, I had a buyer who enjoyed testing out lenses, then returning them. I refused a return, then the above happened.

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PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,680
Re: Ebay strategies?

vyoufinder wrote:

Lost in Knoxville wrote:

I’ve been buying anything and everything on eBay since the beginning. In the last 3 years I have bought a used camera, and two lenses. All three items have been great buys.

There is a risk with eBay, but a few things I always do, check out the seller as much as possible. Look at their history, history of items and reviews, look for return policy, and if something is a great product, make offers if they accept offers. There are sellers who have top quality items and need money, they are willing to unload at your price when desperate.

I also avoid buying from anyone overseas, and I hesitate when I see something from California and has an Asian name. Many times these are fake items.

Sounds like a racism problem.

I knew a woman who sold all of her dead grandmas clothing on eBay. Creepy for sure.

Why? Have you ever been to a thrift store? Most of the clothes in there are "dead guy's clothes."

Yep .... you can get a new "friend" with your purchase and take him/her home with you.

JakeJY Senior Member • Posts: 3,609
Re: Read the Thread

Jonsi wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

I think his point is that if someone is willing to pay more, they can have it.

Here:

"Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline."

I'm typically the same way. I just enter my max upfront, and I either win or I lose.

For more important, or hard-to-find items, I am often there at the end of the auction. Depending on time of day.

My point is that people don't always know they are willing to pay more and by leaving things to last second, you give them less chances to coming to that conclusion earlier in the auction. Again, there are going to be cases where you could have won with the exact same max bid if only you put it in later and don't give people chances to test your max bid or to change their max bid higher.

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PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,680
Re: Ebay strategies?

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

I think it's interesting that your thread about "Ebay strategies" contains so much about buyers' strategies, and very little about selling strategy. That's a pity, because I may also be about to start selling photography stuff again on the bay, after a couple of years away and reading a lot of negative stuff on here from frustrated sellers, I was hoping to get a few helpful ideas. Disappointed so far.

I've read most about "the NAD scam" - it took me an embarrassingly long time to work out that means "Not As Described" - and I think the best starting point to counter that is to use really good photos in the listing, with serial numbers and other identifying features. Ebay is definitely strongly weighted in favour of buyers these days. You will find some interesting stuff about defensive tactics in case you end up in that situation.

Leaving scammers aside, having really good photos should help an item sell.

I'm pretty sure I'm going to limit sales to my own country (UK) - but maybe EU while we're still a member.

I used to offer free postage Royal Mail tracked for the higher end stuff, and I always used to start auctions at £1 but I'm going to rethink that. A well thought out Buy it Now starting point and a realistic approach to "offers" is looking likely.

There was JUST a (recent) reply (but now forgot which) with and excellent selling strategy .... (look at the "recent" replys).

PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,680
Re: How could this happen? Was no reserve set? eBay 101 continues.

Smaug01 wrote:

Corkcampbell wrote:

How could this (below) happen? Was no reserve set? Doesn't really make a difference what the bidding starts at, as long as a proper reserve is set. Allowing low bidding allows some to make a low bid just to keep the auction on their possible purchase list.

"Starting the bidding super low, as you mentioned can get you burned. I tried that recently and overestimated the interest in the item, so someone got a $100 (new) luggage rack for $4 + shipping. I should have started it at a low price, but not a "grab my ankles" price."

Yes, no reserve. Bidders don't like reserves at all; it's perceived as playing games.

There's no point in starting the bidding at $1 if you're going to have a reserve. That's just assuming people are stupid. Plus, I hate getting all those: "what is your reserve?" messages.

I tend to ignore all w/ reserves. I feel like the seller is either playing games or wants too much.

I am on E-Bay to get a good "deal". (Is that $100 luggage still available for $4.00 ??? --- I'll make you an "OFFER" !!!)

threw the lens
threw the lens Senior Member • Posts: 1,459
Re: Ebay strategies?

Setting an 'auction' with a start price of not far from the market vallue is actually a good way to make sure the item doesn't sell.

The reason is a lot of people are surfing for bargains and know they won't get one, and pass on by.

The people who bid on items with no reserve often get no bargain either. Here's why:

The psychology of it seems to be that people get focused on one item and that auction date and it ties them up for a while, and they end up raising their bid due to the time they have invested in it. And in the end they end up paying a completely average market value.

There are lots of psychological studies on pigeons and other animals overvaluing the time they've already put in trying to obtain something and they stick to one place when they would statistically do better to switch. Researchers found the same thing happens with humans.

Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,085
Re: Read the Thread
3

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

The Wikipedia page on auction sniping actually covers all the logic behind this strategy:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auction_sniping

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid, otherwise, B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user. The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid. I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection, when properly deployed. BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user, regardless of timeline.

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PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,680
Re: Read the Thread

Mackiesback wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

The Wikipedia page on auction sniping actually covers all the logic behind this strategy:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auction_sniping

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

The $91 is ONLY if B use eBay's autobid, otherwise, B is hooked for $100.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

Bottom line - sniper program is a third party system that only monitors and advice the user. The user still NEED to MANUALLY enter the bid. I don't know about you, why use a third party that is passive instead of the FREE eBay built-in autobid that is active and offers overbid protection, when properly deployed. BTW, the use may turn-off her/his autobid anytime.

Because that is not how sniping software works. At all. That's not even sniping if it is passive, and nobody would sign up for that. Every sniping program I have used, you enter a max dollar amount you are willing to bid as you set up the snipe, and it will bid for you with a few seconds remaining, time depending if you are using a free version or a paid version. If someone has exceeded the max bid you put into the sniping software well in advance of the staged sniping bid, the sniping software program will let you know. It then gives you the option to cancel the snipe or raise your max dollar amount. If sniping services existed as you described, well, they wouldn't actually exist. What you are describing is useless, and makes me question whether you ave actually used a sniping service before.

The major benefit of sniping software, other the convenience of not having to babysit an auction, is that nobody on the planet knows you are interested in the item. Not only do they not know, they don't have the time and opportunity to rationalize and decide to outbid you. That is the entire strength of sniping programs. With you using eBays autobid, you are shouting your interest to the world, which is a great way to get outbid.

Exactly ... I can't see using that at all.

Of the other programs you mentioned, (where your "secret" until last second), which of those do you recommend as easiest and most reliable ???

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Boils down to the autobid LIMIT set by the user, regardless of timeline.

John Michael Winterbourne
John Michael Winterbourne Senior Member • Posts: 2,791
Re: Ebay strategies?

Thanks Joe - I think you probably mean the one from Smaug01. Some good info there.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63008827

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John Michael Winterbourne
John Michael Winterbourne Senior Member • Posts: 2,791
Re: Read the Thread

Why the interest, Joe - you're surely not planning on selling your FZ1000 ?

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Jonsi
Jonsi Veteran Member • Posts: 4,501
Re: Read the Thread

JakeJY wrote:

Jonsi wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

I have been using eBay's "autobid" for years. I don't wait for the last minute to enter my bid. For example:

An item appears with asking price of $500, remaining time is 5 days, current bid is $10.01 with suggested bid of $12.34. I am interested and willing to pay up to $423.02 . . .
.
I enter $12.34 and then my limit of $423.02 - at the first minute of the listing.
$12.34 will be displayed as the current bid. My limit of $423.02 will not show.
I don't bother with it anymore.
.
Anyone who manually enters bid lower than $423.02 will see the live message of being outbid. For the purpose of discussion, assuming autobid is incremented 5%, someone entered $100, the live message will be displayed along with my current bid of say $105.
.
eBay's autobid will repeat the process - - - applying only the % increase over anyone's manually entered bid. Assuming someone entered $299.99 one second before closing, my winning bid will be $330 not $423.02. eBay will notify me by email.

Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline.

Right, I'm not disputing this progress, but the issue is if you enter say $423.02 at first minute, you give plenty of time for someone to "test" your max bid (I see this happen all the time in auctions, someone goes up slowly until they get right past the max bid).

Even if you enter it at the last minute (but with enough time for someone to change their max bid), people entering a different lower bid (for example $420) will get a notification that they need to increase max bid to win. People in the heat of the moment many times will do so.

This makes it so that for an auction you would have won with your $423.02 max bid, you would lose because you put in the bid too early and gave other people chances to either test or change their mind about their max bid.

I think his point is that if someone is willing to pay more, they can have it.

Here:

"Anytime someone bids over $423.02, eBay notify me by email for an option to make another bid. I ALWAYS decline."

I'm typically the same way. I just enter my max upfront, and I either win or I lose.

For more important, or hard-to-find items, I am often there at the end of the auction. Depending on time of day.

My point is that people don't always know they are willing to pay more and by leaving things to last second, you give them less chances to coming to that conclusion earlier in the auction. Again, there are going to be cases where you could have won with the exact same max bid if only you put it in later and don't give people chances to test your max bid or to change their max bid higher.

I understand.  And I agree with you as far as strategy.

I was just saying the guy you're replying to doesn't seem to care about that.  Different mindset.

Like I said, depending on the item, I approach it different ways. Sometimes I'll wait and bid at the very end, other times I'll put in a max and if I get the item at that price... fine.

PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,680
Re: Read the Thread

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

Why the interest, Joe - you're surely not planning on selling your FZ1000 ?

Only when you "Peel It From My Cold Dead Hands" !!!  (Charlton Heston / RIP)

Actually my FZ-1000 is history.

I stupidly placed it on top of a (8') refrigerator, with the strap hanging down in front. A lady opened the refrigerator and the strap pulled it off. It hit directly on the lens and jammed the focus mechanism.

It (probably) could be fixed, but I instead got a FZ-2500. It indeed has some additional features, but the, (not Leica), lens is not as sharp as the 1000 was.

I envy the RX10-IV (24-600 @ f/2.4-4) w/ "C"-AF @ 25fps .... but can't give up the FA-LCD or 1/4000s flash-sync.

I pray for a camera with best features of both.

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