Ebay strategies?

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Corkcampbell
Corkcampbell Forum Pro • Posts: 18,895
Yeah, eBay takes a certain amount of skill, although not...

Yeah, eBay takes a certain amount of skill, although not as much as in the past before the automatic bidding programs showed up. Nothing against them as they are useful. Timing was critical then, such as ending the auction on a Sunday night (trying to judge which time zone more bids were likely to originate from for a particular item), unless there was a major sporting or similar event occurring at that time. For years I did a lot of this from overseas, which meant often setting my alarm for some ridiculous hour of the night.

I used to really enjoy the frantic last few minutes of an auction (bidding or selling), and remember testing my internet speed and reliability each time before carefully calculating the last possible second to get the bid in after all of the others. Of course, occasionally I'd lose because of someone who did that calculation even better than I could manage.

In reading most of the posts so far, it appears that some really don't understand the process, are afraid of it, etc. My experience has been the opposite, and I consider it, like Amazon, online shopping, websites like B&H's, etc., as to be big contributions to our world, saving us time to spend on more important endeavors.

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 11,063
Re: Such nonsense

Marty4650 wrote:

You say...."Of course you can win against a automatic bidding program"..... but only as long as you are willing to bid the highest possible price.

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

But that isn't the goal of most ebay shoppers. They want to buy something at a very good price, and when you are bidding against a machine that can advance a bid in a fraction of a second, then you are bound for failure and frustration.

Unless of course, you are willing to bid very high, which might be true for you. But if you like doing that, then go for it.

I will continue to shop the buy it now offers. You know, the ones where the seller has to price things slightly lower than Amazon to make a sale. And where I don't have to compete against an autobot.

Different strokes for different folks.

It really is not that different from ,say, a live house auction.

Let's say I instruct my bidder, because I don't want to get emotionally involved, to bid up to 1 million dollars exactly.

Obviously if you are only prepared to bid 980 k for it at some point my bidder will place an offer higher than yours however it will be $500 (or whatever the minimum is) higher than you 900 k maximum.

Of course if no one else was interested an I wasn't there you probably would have had that house for less than you were prepared to pay.

Works the same at Ebay .

In fact if you think about it, auto bids don't have that emotional content of oudbidding someone else live because it is a pre set so it is in fact the opposite of :

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,015
Re: Such nonsense

FrancoD wrote:

Marty4650 wrote:

You say...."Of course you can win against a automatic bidding program"..... but only as long as you are willing to bid the highest possible price.

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

But that isn't the goal of most ebay shoppers. They want to buy something at a very good price, and when you are bidding against a machine that can advance a bid in a fraction of a second, then you are bound for failure and frustration.

Unless of course, you are willing to bid very high, which might be true for you. But if you like doing that, then go for it.

I will continue to shop the buy it now offers. You know, the ones where the seller has to price things slightly lower than Amazon to make a sale. And where I don't have to compete against an autobot.

Different strokes for different folks.

It really is not that different from ,say, a live house auction.

Let's say I instruct my bidder, because I don't want to get emotionally involved, to bid up to 1 million dollars exactly.

Obviously if you are only prepared to bid 980 k for it at some point my bidder will place an offer higher than yours however it will be $500 (or whatever the minimum is) higher than you 900 k maximum.

Of course if no one else was interested an I wasn't there you probably would have had that house for less than you were prepared to pay.

Works the same at Ebay .

it does with one major difference. Live traditional auctions only end when everybody is done bidding, so there is some time for people to let emotions take over. That changes the dynamic overall quite a bit.  There was talk a few years ago of changing eBay to a system where the auction wouldn’t end until the term had not been bid on for a predetermined period of time. Never happened of course, I suppose the logistical difficulties outweighed the anticipated increased revenues and potential of  general buyer confusion.

In fact if you think about it, auto bids don't have that emotional content of oudbidding someone else live because it is a pre set so it is in fact the opposite of :

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 11,063
Re: Such nonsense

Mackiesback wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

Marty4650 wrote:

You say...."Of course you can win against a automatic bidding program"..... but only as long as you are willing to bid the highest possible price.

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

But that isn't the goal of most ebay shoppers. They want to buy something at a very good price, and when you are bidding against a machine that can advance a bid in a fraction of a second, then you are bound for failure and frustration.

Unless of course, you are willing to bid very high, which might be true for you. But if you like doing that, then go for it.

I will continue to shop the buy it now offers. You know, the ones where the seller has to price things slightly lower than Amazon to make a sale. And where I don't have to compete against an autobot.

Different strokes for different folks.

It really is not that different from ,say, a live house auction.

Let's say I instruct my bidder, because I don't want to get emotionally involved, to bid up to 1 million dollars exactly.

Obviously if you are only prepared to bid 980 k for it at some point my bidder will place an offer higher than yours however it will be $500 (or whatever the minimum is) higher than you 900 k maximum.

Of course if no one else was interested an I wasn't there you probably would have had that house for less than you were prepared to pay.

Works the same at Ebay .

it does with one major difference. Live traditional auctions only end when everybody is done bidding, so there is some time for people to let emotions take over. That changes the dynamic overall quite a bit. There was talk a few years ago of changing eBay to a system where the auction wouldn’t end until the term had not been bid on for a predetermined period of time. Never happened of course, I suppose the logistical difficulties outweighed the anticipated increased revenues and potential of general buyer confusion.

In fact if you think about it, auto bids don't have that emotional content of oudbidding someone else live because it is a pre set so it is in fact the opposite of :

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

If that had been implemented it could only result in higher prices taking it further away from the bargain Marty is after.

Mackiesback
Mackiesback Senior Member • Posts: 7,015
Exactly
1

FrancoD wrote:

Mackiesback wrote:

FrancoD wrote:

Marty4650 wrote:

You say...."Of course you can win against a automatic bidding program"..... but only as long as you are willing to bid the highest possible price.

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

But that isn't the goal of most ebay shoppers. They want to buy something at a very good price, and when you are bidding against a machine that can advance a bid in a fraction of a second, then you are bound for failure and frustration.

Unless of course, you are willing to bid very high, which might be true for you. But if you like doing that, then go for it.

I will continue to shop the buy it now offers. You know, the ones where the seller has to price things slightly lower than Amazon to make a sale. And where I don't have to compete against an autobot.

Different strokes for different folks.

It really is not that different from ,say, a live house auction.

Let's say I instruct my bidder, because I don't want to get emotionally involved, to bid up to 1 million dollars exactly.

Obviously if you are only prepared to bid 980 k for it at some point my bidder will place an offer higher than yours however it will be $500 (or whatever the minimum is) higher than you 900 k maximum.

Of course if no one else was interested an I wasn't there you probably would have had that house for less than you were prepared to pay.

Works the same at Ebay .

it does with one major difference. Live traditional auctions only end when everybody is done bidding, so there is some time for people to let emotions take over. That changes the dynamic overall quite a bit. There was talk a few years ago of changing eBay to a system where the auction wouldn’t end until the term had not been bid on for a predetermined period of time. Never happened of course, I suppose the logistical difficulties outweighed the anticipated increased revenues and potential of general buyer confusion.

In fact if you think about it, auto bids don't have that emotional content of oudbidding someone else live because it is a pre set so it is in fact the opposite of :

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

If that had been implemented it could only result in higher prices taking it further away from the bargain Marty is after.

Exactly. iIRC, they were proposing an auction end time, where the auction would “end” but someone could bid up to 5 minutes after the end time to keep it alive, and the auction would only truly end after nobody bid during the 5 minute grace period. That would be more like a true auction, although people have enough difficulty understanding it now. I can’t imagine how much they would struggle with such a system if implemented.

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 11,063
Re: Such nonsense

Marty4650 wrote:

You say...."Of course you can win against a automatic bidding program"..... but only as long as you are willing to bid the highest possible price.

Just keep bidding, and bid a lot. You surely will win. Then congratulate yourself for "winning" something, even though you could end up paying more for it than simply buying it from Amazon or KEH.

But that isn't the goal of most ebay shoppers. They want to buy something at a very good price, and when you are bidding against a machine that can advance a bid in a fraction of a second, then you are bound for failure and frustration.

Unless of course, you are willing to bid very high, which might be true for you. But if you like doing that, then go for it.

I will continue to shop the buy it now offers. You know, the ones where the seller has to price things slightly lower than Amazon to make a sale. And where I don't have to compete against an autobot.

Different strokes for different folks.

Let me try a different way to show that auto bidding can be  exactly the opposite of that.

There is a Canon 24mm lens for auction. $200 starting price.

You are prepared to pay $250 for it, my limit thinking logically and sober, is $240.

10 minutes before the end you have posted your $250 bid.

It's 10 PM, I have had a couple of drinks, I have been bidding in $5 increments for the last two hours and well there is no way I am going to lose that for $10 so I go up to $255...

Auto bid

10PM there is 3AM here . I am asleep.

I have instructed , thinking logically and sober, my Auto Bid to go up to $240.

You have put a bid for $250 , you win.

BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 1,872
Re: LAST 10-15 "seconds" !!!
3

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

I love E-Bay ...

But I NEVER bid until the "last-10-15" seconds, (to late for anyone else to respond).

That will work IF and only IF your bid is higher that the maximum limit of any auto-bidder.  I don't know about your reaction time,  however, I doubt it is faster than any modern computer.

My first purchase at eBay was in 2013. At the time, I waited to the last minute to submit my bid, only to be "outbid" several times.

Exactly why I specified "10-15 seconds).

And I should clarify that is where I "start" the bid-entry process, w/ actual bid "entry" w/in "5" seconds.

It indeed has to be where no time remains for a (higher) response.

Read the above again.
What part of AUTO-BID don't you understand.

Never won using that strategy.

Three years ago, I took advantage of the "auto-bid" on items I am serious to buy. Submitted my starting bid in-line with the suggested bid AND the LIMIT I am willing to pay for the item, not a penny more.

I have never used those ... but good idea if works 100%.

Ahhhhhh . . . finally.

Sure I lost some to someone whose bid is over my limit, however, I won some for LESS than my specified limit. My last winning bid was $479 which is roughly $70 lower than the limit I set.

PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,668
Re: LAST 10-15 "seconds" !!!

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

I love E-Bay ...

But I NEVER bid until the "last-10-15" seconds, (to late for anyone else to respond).

That will work IF and only IF your bid is higher that the maximum limit of any auto-bidder. I don't know about your reaction time, however, I doubt it is faster than any modern computer.

My first purchase at eBay was in 2013. At the time, I waited to the last minute to submit my bid, only to be "outbid" several times.

Exactly why I specified "10-15 seconds).

And I should clarify that is where I "start" the bid-entry process, w/ actual bid "entry" w/in "5" seconds.

It indeed has to be where no time remains for a (higher) response.

Read the above again.
What part of AUTO-BID don't you understand.

Never won using that strategy.

Three years ago, I took advantage of the "auto-bid" on items I am serious to buy. Submitted my starting bid in-line with the suggested bid AND the LIMIT I am willing to pay for the item, not a penny more.

I have never used those ... but good idea if works 100%.

Ahhhhhh . . . finally.

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

I have very very very (most) often been able to do that w/out auto-bid, but admit that can be a time-saver since I often had to "re-schedule" my time to allow that, (and also admit very often forgetting and thus missing items ending).

Sure I lost some to someone whose bid is over my limit, however, I won some for LESS than my specified limit. My last winning bid was $479 which is roughly $70 lower than the limit I set.

BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 1,872
Re: LAST 10-15 "seconds" !!!
2

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A  person maybe

But

Not too late for a :  "WHAT is a Computer program?"

JakeJY Senior Member • Posts: 3,603
Re: LAST 10-15 "seconds" !!!
1

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

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BrownieVet Senior Member • Posts: 1,872
Read the Thread
2

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

The OP is about eBay Strategy.  Honestly, what does that mean to you?

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

Autobid is a computer program (app) free service offered by eBay for free. Please read the entire thread between PhotoTeach and myself.

JakeJY Senior Member • Posts: 3,603
Re: Read the Thread

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

The OP is about eBay Strategy. Honestly, what does that mean to you?

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

Autobid is a computer program (app) free service offered by eBay for free. Please read the entire thread between PhotoTeach and myself.

I'm not sure if my point was made clear. You and PhotoTeach aren't talking exactly about the same thing. You are talking about autobid (eBay's built in function) or in combination with a computer program/app that does sniping (last second bids).

The scenario I'm talking about (and I believe PhotoTeach was talking about) goes more like this.

Say for example A's max bid is $90 (set either in eBay or in a sniper program/app). Your (B) max bid is $100.

A enters $90 in to eBay earlier in the auction as max bid (the visible current bid amount would be lower due to eBay's autobid system). B enters $100 at last moment (either manually or sniper program/app does) too late to allow a human response to eBay's notification that A must increase max bid to win. B wins the auction at $91.

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

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PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,668
Re: Read the Thread

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

JakeJY wrote:

BrownieVet wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

The bottom line is still submitting a bid in last "seconds" (too late to allow response).

Too late for whom? A person maybe

But

Not too late for a : "WHAT is a Computer program?"

Yes, a person. He's not talking about out bidding autobid, but talking about people that set their max bid higher at last minute when they receive notification they have been outbid (aka they change their mind about the maximum they are willing to pay).

The OP is about eBay Strategy. Honestly, what does that mean to you?

A computer program and autobid doesn't do that for you, they only go up to what max bid you set before.

Autobid is a computer program (app) free service offered by eBay for free. Please read the entire thread between PhotoTeach and myself.

I'm not sure if my point was made clear. You and PhotoTeach aren't talking exactly about the same thing. You are talking about autobid (eBay's built in function) or in combination with a computer program/app that does sniping (last second bids).

The scenario I'm talking about (and I believe PhotoTeach was talking about) goes more like this.

Say for example A's max bid is $90 (set either in eBay or in a sniper program/app). Your (B) max bid is $100.

A enters $90 in to eBay earlier in the auction as max bid (the visible current bid amount would be lower due to eBay's autobid system). B enters $100 at last moment (either manually or sniper program/app does) too late to allow a human response to eBay's notification that A must increase max bid to win. B wins the auction at $91.

If A enters $90 after B enters $100, B still wins at $91, because A is too late for a human response to the eBay notice to increase max bid.

If A was using sniper program/app, it would play out the same way. No matter if A comes before B or B comes before A, B will win as long as it is too late for a human response to notification to increase max bid. B does not need a computer program to accomplish this and at no point does a computer program's superior response time come into play. All the computer program adds is convenience for B, so there isn't a need to monitor the end of auction.

If however A's max bid was $110 all along, A will win regardless of how late B enters $100. I don't believe PhotoTeach is talking about winning in this scenario.

Yes ... exactly ...

BUT to be honest I am not familiar with "ebays" auto-bid.

But to your scenario above ... that was exactly correct.  IF I time it "perfectly", I can enter a "max" bid and if I get it (assuming not against an active "sniper" program that I also admit not being prior familiar with), there is no time for a return bid.

However ... again ... if timed "perfectly", I have immediately seen I was outbid and (if I want it bad enough), I DO HAVE TIME for a second try.  (again ... only if timed "perfectly")

But now I do want to investigate the (ext) auto-bidders because I admitted I have also very often forgotten (bid) closing time and missed items I wanted.

LOL ... I WON an item once while being "attacked" by a UNION MOB.  It was something I wanted very much so I just LAID ON THE GROUND while others were "fighting" all around me.  I waiting for the exact split second and won the item (a Welding Inspection NDT-Ultra-Sound Testing instrument).  I then arose and joined the police as they arrested our attackers.

John Michael Winterbourne
John Michael Winterbourne Senior Member • Posts: 2,776
Re: Ebay strategies?

I think it's interesting that your thread about "Ebay strategies" contains so much about buyers' strategies, and very little about selling strategy.  That's a pity, because I may also be about to start selling photography stuff again on the bay, after a couple of years away and reading a lot of negative stuff on here from frustrated sellers, I was hoping to get a few helpful ideas.  Disappointed so far.

I've read most about "the NAD scam" - it took me an embarrassingly long time to work out that means "Not As Described" - and I think the best starting point to counter that is to use really good photos in the listing, with serial numbers and other identifying features.  Ebay is definitely strongly weighted in favour of buyers these days.  You will find some interesting stuff about defensive tactics in case you end up in that situation.

Leaving scammers aside, having really good photos should help an item sell.

I'm pretty sure I'm going to limit sales to my own country (UK) - but maybe EU while we're still a member.

I used to offer free postage Royal Mail tracked for the higher end stuff, and I always used to start auctions at £1 but I'm going to rethink that.   A well thought out Buy it Now starting point and a realistic approach to "offers" is looking likely.

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Kung Fu
Kung Fu Senior Member • Posts: 3,636
Re: Ebay strategies?
2

John Michael Winterbourne wrote:

I think it's interesting that your thread about "Ebay strategies" contains so much about buyers' strategies, and very little about selling strategy. That's a pity, because I may also be about to start selling photography stuff again on the bay, after a couple of years away and reading a lot of negative stuff on here from frustrated sellers, I was hoping to get a few helpful ideas. Disappointed so far.

I've read most about "the NAD scam" - it took me an embarrassingly long time to work out that means "Not As Described" - and I think the best starting point to counter that is to use really good photos in the listing, with serial numbers and other identifying features.

eBay, when reviewing your dispute, will not even look at your photos or description. They don’t care. Buyer says “not as described” = you lose. Period. And the refund money is withdrawn from your linked bank account and sent to the seller immediately, and without your express authorization.

Also look up the “chargeback” scam. That happened to me too.

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vyoufinder
vyoufinder Senior Member • Posts: 1,413
Re: Ebay strategies?
3

Lost in Knoxville wrote:

I’ve been buying anything and everything on eBay since the beginning. In the last 3 years I have bought a used camera, and two lenses. All three items have been great buys.

There is a risk with eBay, but a few things I always do, check out the seller as much as possible. Look at their history, history of items and reviews, look for return policy, and if something is a great product, make offers if they accept offers. There are sellers who have top quality items and need money, they are willing to unload at your price when desperate.

I also avoid buying from anyone overseas, and I hesitate when I see something from California and has an Asian name. Many times these are fake items.

Sounds like a racism problem.

I knew a woman who sold all of her dead grandmas clothing on eBay. Creepy for sure.

Why?  Have you ever been to a thrift store?  Most of the clothes in there are "dead guy's clothes."

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John Michael Winterbourne
John Michael Winterbourne Senior Member • Posts: 2,776
Re: Ebay strategies?

That doesn't tally with the research I did into it a week or so ago.  One of the key points I think was to respond in a timely fashion offering a return/full refund and then take it from there.  I'll do more research before I start any sales.  But I don't believe it's as simple as "buyer claims NAD and that's the end of it ".

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Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,833
Your strategy looks (mostly) good
1

Other people list them high either because they're too lazy to research or because they're hoping for a bidder who is too lazy to research. (assuming the same quality of item)

Starting the bidding super low, as you mentioned can get you burned. I tried that recently and overestimated the interest in the item, so someone got a $100 (new) luggage rack for $4 + shipping. I should have started it at a low price, but not a "grab my ankles" price.

For Buy it Now to be worth its fee, it has to be low enough that one of the first people who looks will buy it. Otherwise, if someone else wants it but doesn't want to pay that much, they'll just place a low bid, which cancels the Buy it Now option.

I don't know if you're aware, but ebay now has a way to list them at a fixed price, with no option to bid, but with an option to Make an Offer. It goes for 30 days instead of 7 days. These days, I like this option the best. I can list something for a reasonable fixed price, allow offers, (many will be ridiculous) without the option for some cheapskate to place a bid and blast that fixed price. (as with Buy it Now, above)  Or, I can list it at a bargain price, (but which I'd still be OK with) and no option to make lowball offers.

Bottom Line: Don't plan on your bidders being dumb. Plan on them researching and coming to the conclusion that your stuff is the best deal. Don't try to satisfy the guys who are looking for bargain basement.

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Corkcampbell
Corkcampbell Forum Pro • Posts: 18,895
How could this happen? Was no reserve set? eBay 101 continues.
1

How could this (below) happen? Was no reserve set? Doesn't really make a difference what the bidding starts at, as long as a proper reserve is set. Allowing low bidding allows some to make a low bid just to keep the auction on their possible purchase list.

"Starting the bidding super low, as you mentioned can get you burned. I tried that recently and overestimated the interest in the item, so someone got a $100 (new) luggage rack for $4 + shipping. I should have started it at a low price, but not a "grab my ankles" price."

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Krav Maga
Krav Maga Senior Member • Posts: 3,011
Re: Ebay strategies?

Bobthearch wrote:

It seems to me that more people now just want to shop, Buy-It-Now, not compete in an auction. At least for common items. For rare or valuable items, I'd certainly utilize the auction features.

^^^ This. And the data back it up.

If it were me I'd pick a price, list it as a Fixed Price item with a Best Offer option with an auto accept and auto decline price AND immediate payment required.

This way, if someone hits the auto accept price in their offer or clicks Buy It Now, they are required to pay at that time. However the item remains active until they pay.

If no one hits the auto accept threshold, you can look at the offers and choose whose offer you want to accept. If some Joe Blow with zero feedback who opened up an account yesterday has made an offer and it just doesn't feel right, you may want to decline it. No harm, no foul. The offer from the person who has double digit buyer feedback is far more likely to be legit.

Listing camera or electronic gear has a tendency to bring out the knuckleheads. Listing in the manner described above will largely mitigate the knuckleheads.

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