Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
LoneTree1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,547
Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this
4

So you wouldn't have to try to cozy up to a wild animal to get a photo with a phone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49101874

araudan
araudan Contributing Member • Posts: 567
Re: Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this
38

LoneTree1 wrote:

So you wouldn't have to try to cozy up to a wild animal to get a photo with a phone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49101874

Common sense would have been even more effective.

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Dan

Mark B. Forum Pro • Posts: 26,193
Re: Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this
8

araudan wrote:

LoneTree1 wrote:

So you wouldn't have to try to cozy up to a wild animal to get a photo with a phone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49101874

Common sense would have been even more effective.

Unfortunately it seems common sense is a lot more expensive, and thus out of reach for many.

jcharding Senior Member • Posts: 2,484
Wow

I've seen the video. It appears to have been deleted.  From what I remember your statement is way off base.

What were these people doing? We have no idea. The original clip is 12 seconds long, and doesn't show what they did before the buffalo charged. I don't even recall them having a camera.  So for you to say a 9 year old kid getting tossed into the air like a rag doll because they needed a longer lens is ridiculous.

This is not to say that they were innocent - they might have been making noises at the buffalo to get it to pick its head up. But quite honestly they might just have been walking by on the trail.  And quite honestly I've been in that exact situation at Yellowstone. With buffalo and elk common, sometimes you have no choice but to ignore NPS distance limitations.  Heck, when I was there last year there were multiple elk two feet outside the front door of our cabin at Mammoth.  So you eye them, see if they care about you, and slip by.

With me and the buffalo (on a different trip), i was hiking back from Fairy Falls and Imperial Geyser.  Lots of buffalo, and I and others are on the trail. We aren't stopping. We are just walking.  Two buffaloes do a walk by of each other, sizing each other up. It isn't mating season, but they are practicing anyway. The "loser" of the buffalo walk by rolls in the dirt (trying to prove it is still manly even though it "lost"), and for the first time eyes us.  We beat a hasty retreat and walk even faster.  Fortunately we aren't charged, but it easily could have been a different outcome because we were about as close as this family. Would you have suggested that we wait an hour until the buffalo moved?  Because by then it would have been dark.

So, despite NPS guidance, some human - animal action is unavoidable at Yellowstone.  Sure the humans could wait an hour or so until the animals move and can follow the rules perfectly, but sometimes you just have to evaluate the animal.  Am I making it uncomfortable?

In this instance there is no indication the animal is uncomfortable.  It goes from quietly grazing to charging instantly.  This is bad luck - probably.  We again don't know the full story. But to use their misfortune to torch the family to have needed a longer lens? IMHO way out of bounds.

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Barry Twycross Senior Member • Posts: 1,568
Re: Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this
3

Mark B. wrote:

araudan wrote:

LoneTree1 wrote:

So you wouldn't have to try to cozy up to a wild animal to get a photo with a phone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49101874

Common sense would have been even more effective.

Unfortunately it seems common sense is a lot more expensive, and thus out of reach for many.

The park service does it's best to aide common sense. (These pictures from 10 years ago, I assume they still do.)

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JRP64
JRP64 Contributing Member • Posts: 823
Re: Wow
3

I was watching Alaska State Troopers where a trooper had to call for backup as he was on foot and there was a large elk blocking his way to his car. I agree calling for a longer lens is a silly statement, but saying that you had no choice in continuing the way you were heading is also side. Hello? You're out in the wild and probably can find an alternative route to where you are going or worse wait until the large animal has moved to another location.

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tex Veteran Member • Posts: 7,915
Real cameras/lenses can't mitigate stupidity /nt
2
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Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,834
I saw it in person
4

I was at Yellowstone two years ago with my family. There are signs EVERYWHERE saying to stay away from the animals.

...but a few stupid people look around, see that there is no ranger watching them, and decide to do it anyway. Then, others watching see this guy "get away with it" and they want close pictures too. So they all get close.

I'm amazed it doesn't happen MORE often.

To your humorous point: yes, a proper camera and telephoto lens could have helped avoid that. But people like to think their phones do everything, and they don't wan't to hear otherwise. Another example? People see I wear a watch and ask me the time. I tell them "time to get a watch."  Then, they angrily pull out their phone and berate me for my comment. They're convinced that the phone is all they need. I tell them they've gone back to the 19th century where all people had were pocket watches. It falls on deaf ears.

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Beachcomber Joe
Beachcomber Joe Senior Member • Posts: 1,241
Re: Wow
1

jcharding wrote:

I've seen the video. It appears to have been deleted. From what I remember your statement is way off base.

What were these people doing? We have no idea.

Sure we do.  They were clearly ignoring the NPS distance guidelines which are meant to keep the general public safe. The result was a tragedy and not something to be made light of as the OP did.

This is not to say that they were innocent - they might have been making noises at the buffalo to get it to pick its head up. But quite honestly they might just have been walking by on the trail. And quite honestly I've been in that exact situation at Yellowstone. With buffalo and elk common, sometimes you have no choice but to ignore NPS distance limitations.

You don't know how to back up or go around?

With me and the buffalo (on a different trip), i was hiking back from Fairy Falls and Imperial Geyser. Lots of buffalo, and I and others are on the trail. We aren't stopping. We are just walking. Two buffaloes do a walk by of each other, sizing each other up. It isn't mating season, but they are practicing anyway. The "loser" of the buffalo walk by rolls in the dirt (trying to prove it is still manly even though it "lost"), and for the first time eyes us. We beat a hasty retreat and walk even faster. Fortunately we aren't charged, but it easily could have been a different outcome because we were about as close as this family. Would you have suggested that we wait an hour until the buffalo moved? Because by then it would have been dark.

Common sense would suggest that.

So, despite NPS guidance, some human - animal action is unavoidable at Yellowstone. Sure the humans could wait an hour or so until the animals move and can follow the rules perfectly, but sometimes you just have to evaluate the animal. Am I making it uncomfortable?

No you don't "have to".  You can "choose to" if you feel getting to your destination outweighs the risk.

In this instance there is no indication the animal is uncomfortable. It goes from quietly grazing to charging instantly. This is bad luck - probably. We again don't know the full story. But to use their misfortune to torch the family to have needed a longer lens? IMHO way out of bounds.

Bad luck?  Most certainly.  And I agree, the OP was way out of bounds.

jcharding Senior Member • Posts: 2,484
Re: Wow
1

Three thoughts (for you and others).

1.  In Yellowstone there often is no other way around. In my case I had thermal features all around - and more buffalo. Going around wasn't an option, and frequently isn't.

2.  People are assuming the girl and her family were part of the crowd around the buffalo.  They very well may have been, but they also might have just been walking by at the wrong time.

3. People are latching onto the NPS guidelines.  They are good guidelines. But like the speed limit they are commonly ignored. Now speed limits, and distance guidelines, are there for a reason.  But just because they are broken doesn't mean that fault and blame necessarily follows.

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dmanthree
dmanthree Veteran Member • Posts: 7,989
Re: Real cameras/lenses can't mitigate stupidity /nt
2

Yup, can't fix stupid.

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HRC2016 Senior Member • Posts: 4,655
Idiocy
1

There was a group of people standing 5-10 feet from the animal before it charged.

Not just one idiot. An entire collection of idiots. It's nice when idiots stick together.

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OP LoneTree1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,547
Re: Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this

araudan wrote:

LoneTree1 wrote:

So you wouldn't have to try to cozy up to a wild animal to get a photo with a phone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49101874

Common sense would have been even more effective.

Obviously, but the animals at any kind of distance are little dots on a cellphone cam.

Blame Disney.  60 years of anthropomorphizing  animals makes humans do stupid things.

Marek M Senior Member • Posts: 1,157
You can't buy common sense...
2

araudan wrote:

LoneTree1 wrote:

So you wouldn't have to try to cozy up to a wild animal to get a photo with a phone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49101874

Common sense would have been even more effective.

..but you can buy a camera.

TheBlackGrouse
TheBlackGrouse Senior Member • Posts: 3,011
Re: Real cameras with telephoto lenses could have avoided this

''Witnesses say the bison was surrounded by a group of 50 visitors, far closer than the recommended distance away, for about 20 minutes before it charged.''

The official advice is to stay 70ft (23m) from all large animals in the park. From my experience, even with cattle  this is often too close. I've been attacked by a Galloway (lovely little hornless cow found in petting zoos) from a distance of 300 meters.

A Galloway cow weighs 600 kg and approaches you with a speed of 40 km/h. That does some serious damage and I only survived because I reacted immediately when it stepped out of the herd at 300 meters. I ran to a fence at maximum speed, it was a close call. And yes, this was a regular hiking path.

Ok, and then you see these videos of people close to bisonĀ 

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Montana Floozie
Montana Floozie Regular Member • Posts: 271
Re: Really?
3

The short focal length in most phone cameras contributes to the problem by drawing visitors into unsafe distances, but the problem is the general public perception of the risk -- despite all the signs. If people were as wary of bison as they are of rattlesnakes there would be fewer incidents.

Nearly a million people visit Yellowstone every July, so attacks by wild animals are bound to happen. With phone cameras ubiquitous, those interactions are likely to be recorded.

This little girl was treated and released, so little physical harm done this time. The psychological effect of her caretakers fleeing in the opposite direction may be another story, and the video will likely be with her all her life.

markyboy81 Senior Member • Posts: 2,450
Re: Really?
1

Montana Floozie wrote:

The short focal length in most phone cameras contributes to the problem by drawing visitors into unsafe distances, but the problem is the general public perception of the risk -- despite all the signs. If people were as wary of bison as they are of rattlesnakes there would be fewer incidents.

Nearly a million people visit Yellowstone every July, so attacks by wild animals are bound to happen. With phone cameras ubiquitous, those interactions are likely to be recorded.

This little girl was treated and released, so little physical harm done this time. The psychological effect of her caretakers fleeing in the opposite direction may be another story, and the video will likely be with her all her life.

Were the two people running away the 'caretakers' of the little girl or is that just an assumption?

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nopix
nopix Senior Member • Posts: 1,647
Some people don't have enough sense to avoid a dangerous situation

These were take at Yellowstone NP in 2017.

Bison

Elk

Elk - look at the background picnic table on the left

Everyone of these people had ample opportunity to move away to a safe distance. Some were moved by rangers after these pics were snapped.

I have some similar ones from the Everglades NP of people doing stupid things with alligators.

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