Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

Started Jul 16, 2019 | Discussions
Sea Hunt 2 Regular Member • Posts: 338
Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
1

Hi everyone,

Nikonrumors .com just published information of the new Aurora Aperture filters. For the users of the older Nikon lenses these adapters and filters can probably greatly reduce the sensor dust problems as a filter can permanently be placed in the adapter between the Nikon Z6/7 camera and the lens:

”Aurora Aperture AMF drop-in filters offer many advantages over traditional front mounted lens filters. Since a drop-in filter goes inside a mount adapter...”

One of the new filters is a sensor protector filter:

”PowerUVTM, a sensor protector filter to shield the camera sensor from contamination.”

Good news or what do you others think?

Wahrsager
Wahrsager Senior Member • Posts: 2,378
Dust isn’t an issue on Nikon Z
11

Sea Hunt 2 wrote:

Hi everyone,

Nikonrumors .com just published information of the new Aurora Aperture filters. For the users of the older Nikon lenses these adapters and filters can probably greatly reduce the sensor dust problems as a filter can permanently be placed in the adapter between the Nikon Z6/7 camera and the lens:

”Aurora Aperture AMF drop-in filters offer many advantages over traditional front mounted lens filters. Since a drop-in filter goes inside a mount adapter...”

One of the new filters is a sensor protector filter:

”PowerUVTM, a sensor protector filter to shield the camera sensor from contamination.”

Good news or what do you others think?

I’ve never had an issue with dust and I swap lenses daily in many environments from beach to trunk of car on a thoroughfare. In fact I prefer Z easy-access.  Putting a wet, felt probe into a tight, velvet-coated channel is a sometimes a dicey proposition in a DSLR.

 Wahrsager's gear list:Wahrsager's gear list
Nikon D4S Nikon D500 Nikon D5 Nikon Z6 Nikon Z50 +27 more
michaeladawson Forum Pro • Posts: 14,982
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
2

Sea Hunt 2 wrote:

Hi everyone,

Nikonrumors .com just published information of the new Aurora Aperture filters. For the users of the older Nikon lenses these adapters and filters can probably greatly reduce the sensor dust problems as a filter can permanently be placed in the adapter between the Nikon Z6/7 camera and the lens:

Only if you permanently keep the adapter on the camera. We also don't know how complete the fitting is.  Does it entirely seal off the mount?  Or does it leave significant gaps?

”Aurora Aperture AMF drop-in filters offer many advantages over traditional front mounted lens filters. Since a drop-in filter goes inside a mount adapter...”

One of the new filters is a sensor protector filter:

”PowerUVTM, a sensor protector filter to shield the camera sensor from contamination.”

Good news or what do you others think?

The other thing is that many people insist on using a filter on the front of the lens for protection.  So now you're putting a filter on the front of the lens and on the front of the camera body.  More glass.  Personally, if I used the Aurora Aperture filters I would take off the filter on the lens.

Since it requires the adapter this seems like a product with an expiration date stamped on it.  Meaning that as more and more native Z lenses are produced this product would seem to have decreasing utility.  If you're looking at it as dust protection then using Z lenses part of the time defeats the purpose.

-- hide signature --

Mike Dawson

 michaeladawson's gear list:michaeladawson's gear list
Nikon D7200 Nikon D5 Fujifilm X-T2 Fujifilm X-H1 Nikon Z7 +34 more
olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 27,270
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
5

This adapter is NOT going to end up in my bag. I don't have a dust issue with my Z7. Had to clean it once or twice during the last nine months using a few puffs of air but I would not call that an issue.

 olyflyer's gear list:olyflyer's gear list
Nikon Z7
Greg lamont Regular Member • Posts: 413
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
1

I am not a big fan of filters to begin with having said that I have had issues with dust.
I have come to realize that to be dust (seen) free you really need to stay at F8 or below.
Otherwise plan on spending some time in LR or whichever PP you use.
I used the 24-70 F4 at the Grand Canyon and the ones at F9 and above had spots, I wanted the depth of Field so I lived and cursed with it,  LLOL
It is just the nature of the beast, I used the Rocket Blower and the Image Sensor in camera cleaner.
It starts out ok, but according to some the turning of the lens can create dust, I find that hard to except as the lens should be sealed, but I am not an expert and just go with the flow.

OP Sea Hunt 2 Regular Member • Posts: 338
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

Vladimir writes here under the thread ”Another topic about banding etc.” the following about his Nikon Z:

”In my opinion, the only problem with this camera is that the sensor is no protected - it easily gets dust, and if it’s not critical for a photo, then it’s very bad for a video.”

Videos are also my special consideration. As the shutter times are around 1/50 then often the apertures will be something like 11 or 16. Sensor dust will easily become visible. Cleaning of video shots is more complicated than the cleaning of a few photos.

olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 27,270
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

Greg lamont wrote:

It starts out ok, but according to some the turning of the lens can create dust,

It's actually the zooming which might suck in dust, but more likely the lens change. I would have welcomed if the mechanical shutter would close when the camera is switched off or a lens is removed. It would not provide 100% protection, but definitely some and exactly the same as a DSLR has.

I find that hard to except as the lens should be sealed, but I am not an expert and just go with the flow.

There is no way to seal the lenses hermetically because as you use the zoom or focus the lens, air is sucked in or pushed out, otherwise you would not be able to operate the lenses. There are gaskets and I think they should work pretty well, so I don't think zooming and focusing causes issues, at least not if you are using weather sealed lenses, but as soon as you change a lens there is always a risk. Anyway, In my opinion, tere is no dust issue with the Z7, so I am not worried about changing lenses and also use some old non-sealed lenses.

 olyflyer's gear list:olyflyer's gear list
Nikon Z7
olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 27,270
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

Sea Hunt 2 wrote:

Vladimir writes here under the thread ”Another topic about banding etc.” the following about his Nikon Z:

I don't know who is "Vladimir", but...

”In my opinion, the only problem with this camera is that the sensor is no protected - it easily gets dust, and if it’s not critical for a photo, then it’s very bad for a video.”

Videos are also my special consideration. As the shutter times are around 1/50 then often the apertures will be something like 11 or 16. Sensor dust will easily become visible. Cleaning of video shots is more complicated than the cleaning of a few photos.

Shutter speed does not matter for dust. It's the aperture that makes it visible. If you stop the aperture down too much it may show up in your images. If that's an issue in video because of slow shutter speed maybe an ND filter would help to keep a larger aperture.

But he is right, cleaning a few still images in post is not a big deal, but doing it in video is pretty much impossible. I don't know how to do it in video, if there is some special software or not. Anyway, if one is worried, it is better to check and clean before an important shot.

As far as I know, there are no mirrorless cameras with a mechanical shutter against dust, but as I said a few times already, I think Nikon should introduce this in a firmware update. They could easily implement that the mechanical shutter closes when you switch off the camera or remove a lens. I think there is ZERO reason to keep the mechanical shutter fully open when images can not be taken. The only reason to do that is to be able to clean the sensor, just like in the DSLRs.

 olyflyer's gear list:olyflyer's gear list
Nikon Z7
OP Sea Hunt 2 Regular Member • Posts: 338
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

Just commenting this:

”Shutter speed does not matter for dust. It's the aperture that makes it visible. If you stop the aperture down too much it may show up in your images. If that's an issue in video because of slow shutter speed maybe an ND filter would help to keep a larger aperture.”

An ND filter of the right strength is not always there when you need it for the video. Trying to keep the shutter time around 1/50 may result in f 16 for example. Then it is good to know your sensor is clean not to need to clean your moving image afterwards. So the sensor protection provided by Aurora filters could be an answer to some of us.

See Nikonrumors for the info...

goactive Senior Member • Posts: 1,977
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
2

Have two Z6s no dust problem on either one and I am out in the dust and sand almost every day shooting.

-- hide signature --

Started shooting digital back with the first 2MP cameras. Over 20 cameras later still going. I shoot family and people portraits, weddings, Sports and a little of everything.

 goactive's gear list:goactive's gear list
Nikon Z6 Nikon 1 V2 Nikon 1 J5 Nikon Z50 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G +21 more
Veloster75 Contributing Member • Posts: 919
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
3

Sea Hunt 2 wrote:

Hi everyone,

Nikonrumors .com just published information of the new Aurora Aperture filters. For the users of the older Nikon lenses these adapters and filters can probably greatly reduce the sensor dust problems as a filter can permanently be placed in the adapter between the Nikon Z6/7 camera and the lens:

”Aurora Aperture AMF drop-in filters offer many advantages over traditional front mounted lens filters. Since a drop-in filter goes inside a mount adapter...”

One of the new filters is a sensor protector filter:

”PowerUVTM, a sensor protector filter to shield the camera sensor from contamination.”

Good news or what do you others think?

What dust issue? Did I miss something.? My Z7 has no issue.

-- hide signature --

Have a great life.

 Veloster75's gear list:Veloster75's gear list
Nikon D850 Sony a7R IV Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Sigma 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sony FE 200-600 F5.6-6.3 +9 more
Lawrose
Lawrose Regular Member • Posts: 198
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
1

Greg lamont wrote:

I have come to realize that to be dust (seen) free you really need to stay at F8 or below.
Otherwise plan on spending some time in LR or whichever PP you use.

Yes, after much frustration and blowers, brushes and a wet and dry cleaning procedure, I can only get the sensor "dust free" at f/16 and below on my Z6.

Now then here is the issue: if the dust isn't visible, is it really there? I mean, of course it is, but does it in any way degrade the image even though it is not distinctly visible? Is it worth worrying about since I don't think I have ever shot above f/16 and, like most folks I presume, most of my photos are from wide open to about f/5.6 or f/8.0. (Occasionally, f/11.) Should I declare my sensor "dust free" if I can't see the spots?

I'm keeping in mind that nothing outside of a clean room can ever be literally dust free, right?

 Lawrose's gear list:Lawrose's gear list
Nikon Z6 II Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon Z 24-70mm F4 Nikon Z 50mm F1.8 Nikon Z 35mm F1.8 +2 more
Schorschl Forum Member • Posts: 50
Huh? My Z7 has no dust issues.
2

Using the Z7 since 9 month and over 7000 pics there is no dust on the sensor.

What did I wrong?

DDavis1 Regular Member • Posts: 332
Re: Huh? My Z7 has no dust issues.
1

I've had dust on the sensor. Most of us will have it, but won't see it in images unless you've shot a smaller apertures.

Solution? Save money and buy a Giottos Rocket Blower...$17. You're welcome.

 DDavis1's gear list:DDavis1's gear list
Nikon D3S Nikon D500 Nikon Z6 Nikon 85mm F1.8G Nikon D70s +9 more
Jswell Regular Member • Posts: 223
No dust problem
2

I don't see this being helpful. I shoot adventures (biking, climbing, skiing, etc) and have changed lenses on my Z6 frequently in deserts, mountain, around rivers with blowing dust and rain and only had to blow of my sensor or sensor side of lenses every now and then. There simply isn't a problem with dust on the sensor.

 Jswell's gear list:Jswell's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-M1 II Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4-5.6 R Rokinon 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye CS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro +3 more
Lawrose
Lawrose Regular Member • Posts: 198
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

For the lucky photographers who have no problem with dust on their sensor, try this and get ready for a surprise.

1. Put your camera in Manual focus;

2. Set it to aperture priority, and the aperture on the lens to as small as it will go;

3. Zoom out as far as the lens will go (if it is a zoom lens);

4. Pull up an 18% grey image on your computer (basic white is good enough);

5.  Take a few shots close up, keeping the camera out of focus, at the smallest aperture and then at each aperture until you get to wide open;

6. Load the photos on your computer and pixel peek `em all the way;

7. If you have a "show spots" function in your post processing software, also engage that and have a look at the result.

If you still see nothing, you are a winner. However, my guess is that from about f/16 on, and maybe even larger than that, you will see a fair amount of dust, perhaps a great deal of dust. As I posted earlier, I can get my sensor clean enough that I only see dust above f/16, and then almost always only against a solid background, and I basically never shoot above f/11, so does it matter? Can anything actually be dust free, or are we talking degrees of dust free? If it is degrees, then we should say so, if not, then we, of at least I, need to find a better way.

 Lawrose's gear list:Lawrose's gear list
Nikon Z6 II Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon Z 24-70mm F4 Nikon Z 50mm F1.8 Nikon Z 35mm F1.8 +2 more
Jswell Regular Member • Posts: 223
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
1

This is the classic way to check for dust spots and I'm sure it will show a few. However, they rarely influence a resulting image.

-- hide signature --

www.virgaphotography.com

 Jswell's gear list:Jswell's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Olympus E-M1 II Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F4-5.6 R Rokinon 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye CS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Pro +3 more
DDavis1 Regular Member • Posts: 332
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?

As I stated before, We will ALL get dust on the sensor at some point. Just save the money and buy a blower. $10-$17 on the average. It can be used with ANY camera body and/or lens/body adapter.

Now, if you wanna buy this Aurora adapter filter for the MAIN purpose of filtering light or atmospheric pollution or as an ND filter with the side benefit of helping keep dust off the sensor, then go for it.

But buying this FOR the purpose of keeping dust off the sensor...I see it as a waste of money.

 DDavis1's gear list:DDavis1's gear list
Nikon D3S Nikon D500 Nikon Z6 Nikon 85mm F1.8G Nikon D70s +9 more
Veloster75 Contributing Member • Posts: 919
Re: Aurora filters solve the Nikon Z dust issues?
1

Lawrose wrote:

For the lucky photographers who have no problem with dust on their sensor, try this and get ready for a surprise.

1. Put your camera in Manual focus;

2. Set it to aperture priority, and the aperture on the lens to as small as it will go;

3. Zoom out as far as the lens will go (if it is a zoom lens);

4. Pull up an 18% grey image on your computer (basic white is good enough);

5. Take a few shots close up, keeping the camera out of focus, at the smallest aperture and then at each aperture until you get to wide open;

6. Load the photos on your computer and pixel peek `em all the way;

7. If you have a "show spots" function in your post processing software, also engage that and have a look at the result.

If you still see nothing, you are a winner. However, my guess is that from about f/16 on, and maybe even larger than that, you will see a fair amount of dust, perhaps a great deal of dust. As I posted earlier, I can get my sensor clean enough that I only see dust above f/16, and then almost always only against a solid background, and I basically never shoot above f/11, so does it matter? Can anything actually be dust free, or are we talking degrees of dust free? If it is degrees, then we should say so, if not, then we, of at least I, need to find a better way.

I'm sorry , but what's the big deal? Jeepers crap sake, people just love to find fault or complain about everything no matter how small. Yeah, the sensor is exposed unless a lens is placed in front of it. Yeah, the sensor is exposed when changing lenses. Is it possible the sensor can get dust on it ? Well, yeah. Is it the end of the world, no? is it a manufacture problem? Absolutely not. Does the interior of your car get dusty when you open the door? Yes it does.  Is it a manufacture problem ? No. Just clean the darn thing.

-- hide signature --

Have a great life.

 Veloster75's gear list:Veloster75's gear list
Nikon D850 Sony a7R IV Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Sigma 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sony FE 200-600 F5.6-6.3 +9 more
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads