Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

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camrem New Member • Posts: 5
Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

Hi all,

Me and my partner are trying to get back into photography after a couple of years pause. The pause was triggered when we got tired of carrying around the Pentax DSLRs and leaving them more and more in the hotel room.

I used a Sony nex5t for a couple of years but really disliked the menu and ergonomics and struggled to get sharp images to the point I was wondering what was wrong with the camera or lenses. Last year I left it at home and was surprised how much fun I had with my old Canon S95 which I dropped in my suitcase at the last minute.

Although experienced photographers we are looking at entry level systems because a) most of the time these are more compact and b) we don’t want to spend too much before deciding we are making this a serious activity again.

We’ve looked at:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

Fuji X-T100: liked this very much but are concerned about autofocus issues mentioned in reviews.

Higher end Fuji like X-T1 (used) also fits within budget but we would also need to find a nice lens to fit within budget.

Olympus E-M10 II: really liked it, nice offerings with two lenses and given the price of the lenses (both oly and pana) we might be able to get a nice prime as well. But the model is four years old and are a bit concerned about m43s future. But combined with lens offerings this seems the most bang for buck option.

Priorities are size and handling, price.

Image quality is important as well but I am sure most options above would outperform our k5, nex5t or s95

My question is. What would you recommend or am I missing an option?

Canon EOS M100 Canon PowerShot S95 Fujifilm X-T1 NEX-5T Olympus OM-D E-M10 Pentax K-5
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stargawker
stargawker Forum Member • Posts: 51
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

I have the Panasonic G7 and really like it. I find I prefer the fully articulating screen instead of just a tilting screen like I believe the Olympus EM 10 has.

I took my G7 with 3 lenses (including a 100-300 mm telephoto) and a flash to Ireland in a very tiny bag.

 stargawker's gear list:stargawker's gear list
Sony RX100 Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7
golfhov Forum Pro • Posts: 10,501
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

camrem wrote:

Hi all,

Me and my partner are trying to get back into photography after a couple of years pause. The pause was triggered when we got tired of carrying around the Pentax DSLRs and leaving them more and more in the hotel room.

I used a Sony nex5t for a couple of years but really disliked the menu and ergonomics and struggled to get sharp images to the point I was wondering what was wrong with the camera or lenses. Last year I left it at home and was surprised how much fun I had with my old Canon S95 which I dropped in my suitcase at the last minute.

Although experienced photographers we are looking at entry level systems because a) most of the time these are more compact and b) we don’t want to spend too much before deciding we are making this a serious activity again.

We’ve looked at:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

I think the added adjective says enough

Fuji X-T100: liked this very much but are concerned about autofocus issues mentioned in reviews.

If you aren't complaining about the AF on your old s95 or Nex then I doubt this will really disappoint you

Higher end Fuji like X-T1 (used) also fits within budget but we would also need to find a nice lens to fit within budget.

why not an xt20? the xt1 is pretty dated so unless you found a really good deal I don't know about this choice.

Olympus E-M10 II: really liked it, nice offerings with two lenses and given the price of the lenses (both oly and pana) we might be able to get a nice prime as well.

But the model is four years old and are a bit concerned about m43s future. But combined with lens offerings this seems the most bang for buck option.

if you want small and affordable this may be right up you alley.

Priorities are size

https://camerasize.com/compact/#521,566,719,703,ha,f

and handling,

you are going to have to give them a whirl. We can give you our opinions but they vary

price.

Image quality is important as well but I am sure most options above would outperform our k5, nex5t or s95

s95 yes. The em10 won't do quite as well as the others in your roundup BUT it has the wildcard of IBIS. With certain lenses this can be very helpful

My question is. What would you recommend

sound like the xt100 and em10 ii are both prime candidates for you. I think you could get past the af of the Fuji and in real life the Olympus really won't be much better

or am I missing an option?

I guess my last thing is to not discount 1" pocket able cameras. Pros is they are smaller than the cameras in your list and IQ wise competitive with their bigger sensored relatives. Cons are you may not like the handling and you cannot change lenses. Maybe that is a place to start and then see if you want to go further

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/buying-guide-best-pocketable-enthusiast-cameras

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liopleurodon Senior Member • Posts: 1,132
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system
1

camrem wrote:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

Try a Canon M50 or M5, the handling is vastly improved over the M100.  You can get great deals on the refurbished.

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Sony a7 III Sony FE 35mm F2.8 Tamron 28-75mm F2.8 III Google Pixel 3 +3 more
rz64 Regular Member • Posts: 148
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system
2

liopleurodon wrote:

camrem wrote:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

Try a Canon M50 or M5, the handling is vastly improved over the M100. You can get great deals on the refurbished.

I can support the opinion above. I have a Canon M6, it has a very good handling. Compared to M50 or M5, it has no EVF.
The M50 has a fully articulating screen, I prefer a tilting screen as M5 and M6 have.

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Alex Ethridge
Alex Ethridge Veteran Member • Posts: 4,083
All-in-one
1

If I really wanted to cut down on bulk and weight and still be able to do 99% of all I ever have done, it would be an all-in-one bridge camera.

My choice would be the Lumix FZ1000 or the FZ1000 II.

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 11,461
FZ1000, LX100, LX10, MFT ILC & 14-140
2

I second Alex's recommendation of the FZ1000, especially with the original FZ1000 available for under $500. I handled one recently and was really impressed with the ergonomics and performance, which really are worthy of a much more expensive camera. It is, though, a bit on the bulky side. If you don't need long focal lengths, you might also consider an LX100 MkI or MkII or an LX10.

As an alternative to the FZ1000, I'd suggest also a small MFT ILC with Panasonic's 14-140, but the lens alone costs more than an FZ1000. This gets you IQ and low-light capabilities roughly similar to the FZ1000, with a somewhat shorter max focal length (280mm EFL vs. 400) but also smaller size and the ability to use other lenses. The 14-140 is a remarkably good 10x zoom.

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"I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it." - George Bernard Shaw
http://jacquescornell.photography
http://happening.photos

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rz64 Regular Member • Posts: 148
Re: FZ1000, LX100, LX10, MFT ILC & 14-140

Jacques Cornell wrote:

I second Alex's recommendation of the FZ1000, especially with the original FZ1000 available for under $500. I handled one recently and was really impressed with the ergonomics and performance, which really are worthy of a much more expensive camera. It is, though, a bit on the bulky side. If you don't need long focal lengths, you might also consider an LX100 MkI or MkII or an LX10.

As an alternative to the FZ1000, I'd suggest also a small MFT ILC with Panasonic's 14-140, but the lens alone costs more than an FZ1000. This gets you IQ and low-light capabilities roughly similar to the FZ1000, with a somewhat shorter max focal length (280mm EFL vs. 400) but also smaller size and the ability to use other lenses. The 14-140 is a remarkably good 10x zoom.

Long time ago I used a bridge camera (Panasonic FZ-8), but the pictures below let me change my opinion.

 rz64's gear list:rz64's gear list
Canon EOS M6 Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EF-M 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM Canon EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM Canon EF-M 32mm F1.4
Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,625
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

camrem wrote:

Hi all,

Me and my partner are trying to get back into photography after a couple of years pause. The pause was triggered when we got tired of carrying around the Pentax DSLRs and leaving them more and more in the hotel room.

I used a Sony nex5t for a couple of years but really disliked the menu and ergonomics and struggled to get sharp images to the point I was wondering what was wrong with the camera or lenses. Last year I left it at home and was surprised how much fun I had with my old Canon S95 which I dropped in my suitcase at the last minute.

Although experienced photographers we are looking at entry level systems because a) most of the time these are more compact and b) we don’t want to spend too much before deciding we are making this a serious activity again.

We’ve looked at:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

Fuji X-T100: liked this very much but are concerned about autofocus issues mentioned in reviews.

Higher end Fuji like X-T1 (used) also fits within budget but we would also need to find a nice lens to fit within budget.

Olympus E-M10 II: really liked it, nice offerings with two lenses and given the price of the lenses (both oly and pana) we might be able to get a nice prime as well. But the model is four years old and are a bit concerned about m43s future. But combined with lens offerings this seems the most bang for buck option.

Priorities are size and handling, price.

Image quality is important as well but I am sure most options above would outperform our k5, nex5t or s95

My question is. What would you recommend or am I missing an option?

You won't beat the image quality you got with your Pentax. Would you take it along if you had an all-in-one zoom lens, or was it still too bulky?

I went from a Pentax SLR to a fixed lens camera, the Canon G9X.  It's like your old S95, but a step up in terms of sensor size. Nothing can beat a good quality pocket camera, when you want to take something along that's better than a cell phone camera, but aren't committed enough to carry something that will require its own case. Eventually, I missed some telephoto, and added a Panasonic FZ1000. That one's as big as an SLR, but is a lot lighter and only needs the one lens. (as it's equivalent to a 25-400mm, and stabilized)

Olympus has the E-M10 III out now. I just got one, and love it. Olympus' implementation of the ART filters is great, and the 14-42 f/3.5-5.6 EZ kit lens retracts in, so it's not too much bigger than a fixed lens compact, but has a much larger sensor. I got the body cap fisheye lens and have been having fun with that and using it to fill in when the kit lens isn't wide enough.

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-Jeremy
*********
"Rudeness is the weak person's imitation of strength."

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 11,461
Re: FZ1000, LX100, LX10, MFT ILC & 14-140

rz64 wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

I second Alex's recommendation of the FZ1000, especially with the original FZ1000 available for under $500. I handled one recently and was really impressed with the ergonomics and performance, which really are worthy of a much more expensive camera. It is, though, a bit on the bulky side. If you don't need long focal lengths, you might also consider an LX100 MkI or MkII or an LX10.

As an alternative to the FZ1000, I'd suggest also a small MFT ILC with Panasonic's 14-140, but the lens alone costs more than an FZ1000. This gets you IQ and low-light capabilities roughly similar to the FZ1000, with a somewhat shorter max focal length (280mm EFL vs. 400) but also smaller size and the ability to use other lenses. The 14-140 is a remarkably good 10x zoom.

Long time ago I used a bridge camera (Panasonic FZ-8), but the pictures below let me change my opinion.

You must spend a lot of time at an orchard, because you're one heck of a cherry picker. Why don't you show the M6 with a comparable lens? Oh, right, there isn't one. Here's the nearest I could find:

The Canon combo weighs 1/3 more than the Panasonic. It also lacks an EVF.

Dude, you're really stretching here.

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"I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it." - George Bernard Shaw
http://jacquescornell.photography
http://happening.photos

 Jacques Cornell's gear list:Jacques Cornell's gear list
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Aberaeron Veteran Member • Posts: 7,390
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system
1

camrem wrote:

Hi all,

Me and my partner are trying to get back into photography after a couple of years pause. The pause was triggered when we got tired of carrying around the Pentax DSLRs and leaving them more and more in the hotel room.

I used a Sony nex5t for a couple of years but really disliked the menu and ergonomics and struggled to get sharp images to the point I was wondering what was wrong with the camera or lenses. Last year I left it at home and was surprised how much fun I had with my old Canon S95 which I dropped in my suitcase at the last minute.

Although experienced photographers we are looking at entry level systems because a) most of the time these are more compact and b) we don’t want to spend too much before deciding we are making this a serious activity again.

We’ve looked at:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

Fuji X-T100: liked this very much but are concerned about autofocus issues mentioned in reviews.

Higher end Fuji like X-T1 (used) also fits within budget but we would also need to find a nice lens to fit within budget.

Olympus E-M10 II: really liked it, nice offerings with two lenses and given the price of the lenses (both oly and pana) we might be able to get a nice prime as well. But the model is four years old and are a bit concerned about m43s future. But combined with lens offerings this seems the most bang for buck option.

Priorities are size and handling, price.

Image quality is important as well but I am sure most options above would outperform our k5, nex5t or s95

My question is. What would you recommend or am I missing an option?

I have an E-M10 MkII and like it very much indeed. For the ultimate compactness it comes with the little electronic zoom kit lens, which is OK. Lots of other tiny lenses available from both Olympus and Panasonic plus the aforementioned but rather expensive 14-140 Panasonic which works well on it. I have two of those.  For use with bigger hands and lenses, the optional Olympus handgrip is great.

The E-M10 MkII has five axis in-body stabilisation, which the G7 does not have. It also has anti-shock shutter which the G7 lacks also but the G7 does have an effective automatic selection of mechanical or electronic shutter which is effective enough.

The big bridge cameras from both Panasonic and Sony are great instruments. The Sony are typically weather sealed and feel somewhat better built. Both save you from buying extra expensive lenses and the whole camera doesn't cost more than a single quality long zoom for many interchangeable lens cameras. I've been toying with getting such a bridge camera for years but manage to make do with the M4/3 bodies with the 100-300 [200-600 FF equivalent] for the occasional time I want such a zoom.

If I was starting from a clean sheet, I would probably buy the Sony RX10 MkIII or Panasonic FZ2500. Probably the FZ2500.   If size and weight is a priority, then M4/3 takes some beating, but to cover the same focal length range you will need several lenses and deeper pockets. Since size and weight are often important, I would probably, at some point, buy a smaller M4/3 camera like the GX80 or GX90 or E-M10MkII to complement the big bridge camera.  These are first world problems of course and if I had to choose only one camera it would be either of those two bridge cameras and a spare battery and holster bag. End of. That's all most people would need.

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beagle1 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,049
_________________ yes !!

rz64 wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

I second Alex's recommendation of the FZ1000, especially with the original FZ1000 available for under $500. I handled one recently and was really impressed with the ergonomics and performance, which really are worthy of a much more expensive camera. It is, though, a bit on the bulky side. If you don't need long focal lengths, you might also consider an LX100 MkI or MkII or an LX10.

As an alternative to the FZ1000, I'd suggest also a small MFT ILC with Panasonic's 14-140, but the lens alone costs more than an FZ1000. This gets you IQ and low-light capabilities roughly similar to the FZ1000, with a somewhat shorter max focal length (280mm EFL vs. 400) but also smaller size and the ability to use other lenses. The 14-140 is a remarkably good 10x zoom.

Long time ago I used a bridge camera (Panasonic FZ-8), but the pictures below let me change my opinion.

Canon M100 and M6 are definitely small and lightweight cameras

(I use the older Canon M5 mirrorless )

www.flickr.com/photos/mmirrorless

Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,625
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system
1

Aberaeron wrote:

The big bridge cameras from both Panasonic and Sony are great instruments. The Sony are typically weather sealed and feel somewhat better built. Both save you from buying extra expensive lenses and the whole camera doesn't cost more than a single quality long zoom for many interchangeable lens cameras. I've been toying with getting such a bridge camera for years but manage to make do with the M4/3 bodies with the 100-300 [200-600 FF equivalent] for the occasional time I want such a zoom.

If I was starting from a clean sheet, I would probably buy the Sony RX10 MkIII or Panasonic FZ2500. Probably the FZ2500. If size and weight is a priority, then M4/3 takes some beating, but to cover the same focal length range you will need several lenses and deeper pockets. Since size and weight are often important, I would probably, at some point, buy a smaller M4/3 camera like the GX80 or GX90 or E-M10MkII to complement the big bridge camera. These are first world problems of course and if I had to choose only one camera it would be either of those two bridge cameras and a spare battery and holster bag. End of. That's all most people would need.

^ This makes a lot of sense. Except for (occasionally) an ultra-wide angle, I never missed anything on my FZ1000. Luckily, my phone has an ultra-wide lens to supplement, though with a 1/3" sensor and f/2.6, it sucks in low light.

DPReview surmised that the Sony RX10 is slightly better for stills and the Panasonic is better for video. (and a lot less expensive)

One nice thing about Panasonic is that they use the same flash dedication as Olympus, so if you got back in with the FZ1000 or similar, then decided to add µ4/3 later, you could share the flash. I have a good bounce flash for my FZ1000 that I happily discovered works on my EM10 III.

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-Jeremy
*********
"Rudeness is the weak person's imitation of strength."

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Smaug01
Smaug01 Senior Member • Posts: 2,625
What's nice about the compact bodies is that >

> If you want a compact rig, you just bring a compact lens. (e.g. pancake or body cap lenses) You still have the large sensor to retain image quality and dynamic range, but lose the zoom.

If you want serious optical prowess, you buy a serious lens and give up the compactness.

This applies to these new Canon and Sony APS-C mirrorless options as well as Panasonic and Olympus µ4/3.

-- hide signature --

-Jeremy
*********
"Rudeness is the weak person's imitation of strength."

 Smaug01's gear list:Smaug01's gear list
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GohanX Forum Member • Posts: 95
Re: _________________ yes !!
2

I can't compare a lot of those cameras on the list, but I've had a Canon S95 for a while (still love it) and I recently picked up the OM-D E10 Mk II. With one of the pancake lenses it's mostly replaced the S95 in most situations now. It's not quite pocketable like the S95, but it's small and light enough to be unobtrusive hanging from a neck strap and if you have larger pockets like in cargo shorts they will fit in there. Main advantages is the image quality is a bit better in all conditions, but in low light the Olympus is MUCH better than the S95, even though the kit lens doesn't have as wide an aperture.  Also picking up the little plastic 40-150 lens for $99 adds a pretty light and solid telephoto to it that's easy to carry in the other pocket.

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OP camrem New Member • Posts: 5
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

golfhov wrote:

camrem wrote:

Hi all,

Me and my partner are trying to get back into photography after a couple of years pause. The pause was triggered when we got tired of carrying around the Pentax DSLRs and leaving them more and more in the hotel room.

I used a Sony nex5t for a couple of years but really disliked the menu and ergonomics and struggled to get sharp images to the point I was wondering what was wrong with the camera or lenses. Last year I left it at home and was surprised how much fun I had with my old Canon S95 which I dropped in my suitcase at the last minute.

Although experienced photographers we are looking at entry level systems because a) most of the time these are more compact and b) we don’t want to spend too much before deciding we are making this a serious activity again.

We’ve looked at:

Canon M100: cheapest and most compact option and similarities in menu system to S95. But really disliked the handling.

I think the added adjective says enough

Fuji X-T100: liked this very much but are concerned about autofocus issues mentioned in reviews.

If you aren't complaining about the AF on your old s95 or Nex then I doubt this will really disappoint you

Higher end Fuji like X-T1 (used) also fits within budget but we would also need to find a nice lens to fit within budget.

why not an xt20? the xt1 is pretty dated so unless you found a really good deal I don't know about this choice.

Olympus E-M10 II: really liked it, nice offerings with two lenses and given the price of the lenses (both oly and pana) we might be able to get a nice prime as well.

But the model is four years old and are a bit concerned about m43s future. But combined with lens offerings this seems the most bang for buck option.

if you want small and affordable this may be right up you alley.

Priorities are size

https://camerasize.com/compact/#521,566,719,703,ha,f

and handling,

you are going to have to give them a whirl. We can give you our opinions but they vary

price.

Image quality is important as well but I am sure most options above would outperform our k5, nex5t or s95

s95 yes. The em10 won't do quite as well as the others in your roundup BUT it has the wildcard of IBIS. With certain lenses this can be very helpful

My question is. What would you recommend

sound like the xt100 and em10 ii are both prime candidates for you. I think you could get past the af of the Fuji and in real life the Olympus really won't be much better

or am I missing an option?

I guess my last thing is to not discount 1" pocket able cameras. Pros is they are smaller than the cameras in your list and IQ wise competitive with their bigger sensored relatives. Cons are you may not like the handling and you cannot change lenses. Maybe that is a place to start and then see if you want to go further

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/buying-guide-best-pocketable-enthusiast-cameras

Thanks for the elaborate answer. I do feel size needs to be experienced first hand. I expected the M100 to be much smaller compared to the XT100 based on camerasize.com.

The S95 wasn’t the quickest with autofocus. Not suitable for every situation but performed up to my expectations given the type of camera it was.

The next 5t was ok in terms of speed. But somehow unsharp 1 out of 3 times. I tried faster shutter speeds and a tripod to rule out motion blur but still unreliable. Both with the 16-50 kitlens as well as a 19mm f2.8 sigma prime both wide open as well as stopped down.

I am looking at 1 inch sensor compacts as well. But my partner wants at least m43 and the future possibility of changing lenses if I want the DSLR to stay at home 😉

OP camrem New Member • Posts: 5
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

You won't beat the image quality you got with your Pentax. Would you take it along if you had an all-in-one zoom lens, or was it still too bulky?

our kit consisted of a sigma 18-200 and 35 mil Pentax. We mostly used the 35. Expect when we expect to need the longer range for instance for wildlife.

I went from a Pentax SLR to a fixed lens camera, the Canon G9X. It's like your old S95, but a step up in terms of sensor size. Nothing can beat a good quality pocket camera, when you want to take something along that's better than a cell phone camera, but aren't committed enough to carry something that will require its own case. Eventually, I missed some telephoto, and added a Panasonic FZ1000. That one's as big as an SLR, but is a lot lighter and only needs the one lens. (as it's equivalent to a 25-400mm, and stabilized)

Olympus has the E-M10 III out now. I just got one, and love it. Olympus' implementation of the ART filters is great, and the 14-42 f/3.5-5.6 EZ kit lens retracts in, so it's not too much bigger than a fixed lens compact, but has a much larger sensor. I got the body cap fisheye lens and have been having fun with that and using it to fill in when the kit lens isn't wide enough.

not sure about the fz1000. We’re kind of fond of fast primes. Something g9x might be added for really lazy moments but not as our primary system.

-- hide signature --

-Jeremy
*********
"Rudeness is the weak person's imitation of strength."

OP camrem New Member • Posts: 5
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

stargawker wrote:

I have the Panasonic G7 and really like it. I find I prefer the fully articulating screen instead of just a tilting screen like I believe the Olympus EM 10 has.

I took my G7 with 3 lenses (including a 100-300 mm telephoto) and a flash to Ireland in a very tiny bag.

Thanks, I don’t know why I left Panasonic out in my comparisons. So that’s a nice addition. Looking at their offerings I am more drawn towards the aesthetics of the GX series. Also, we are stills-only shooters, no movie at all. I also read jpegs are better in the Olympus. We plan to shoot Raw+jpeg to be sure but plan on doing as little post as possible.

OP camrem New Member • Posts: 5
Re: Recommendation entry level mirrorless system

Thanks, I will look into those. My first impressions were that the evf on top felt a bit bulky compared to the ones on top of the Olympus and Fuji. But maybe discarded them to quickly after the M100 disappointed.

Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 11,461
Panasonic JPEGs, etc.

camrem wrote:

stargawker wrote:

I have the Panasonic G7 and really like it. I find I prefer the fully articulating screen instead of just a tilting screen like I believe the Olympus EM 10 has.

I took my G7 with 3 lenses (including a 100-300 mm telephoto) and a flash to Ireland in a very tiny bag.

Thanks, I don’t know why I left Panasonic out in my comparisons. So that’s a nice addition. Looking at their offerings I am more drawn towards the aesthetics of the GX series. Also, we are stills-only shooters, no movie at all. I also read jpegs are better in the Olympus. We plan to shoot Raw+jpeg to be sure but plan on doing as little post as possible.

Both Olympus and Panasonic have (according to reviews) improved their JPEG processing over time. It may be that at some point Olympus did better than Panasonic, but reviews of recent Panasonic models' JPEG processing have been quite favorable. IOW, neither is standing still, and what might have been true just a year or two ago may not be today. I can't comment on Panasonic JPEG quality because I shoot RAW almost exclusively.

FWIW, I have a Sony a7RIII, but my travel camera of choice is still my GX9 with 14-140. It's tiny & light, delivers very crisp images I can print 24"x32", and is just generally a joy to use. The main downsides? A comparatively small 4:3 image in the 16:9 EVF, and EVF optics that make it a bit difficult to have a clear view of the whole image. That said, I did tons of event work over three years with three GX7s that had essentially the same EVFs, and I never felt like the EVFs were an obstacle. I did replace two of them with GX8s for my event work because of the larger grips and luxuriously large EVFs, but the GX9 remains my travel pick because of its small size.

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"I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it." - George Bernard Shaw
http://jacquescornell.photography
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 Jacques Cornell's gear list:Jacques Cornell's gear list
Sony a7R II Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85 Sony a7R III Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 +42 more
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