6D MKII Focus question

Started 6 months ago | Discussions
Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
6D MKII Focus question

This morning I took more practice shots and I moved the center focus point up as I was getting blurry photos at times leaving the red square in the center. The first photo was spot on clear as can be. Now the second photo shows the red square right on the horses head yet my daughter and horse are blurry and the background is clear. The 2 photos were converted to jpeg and unedited. You guys are the professionals so why does it do this and your thoughts are the good photo?

I was contemplating trading the 6d MK II in for a 5D IV or a mirror less

?

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EOS 6D
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MarshallG
MarshallG Veteran Member • Posts: 7,275
Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!
2

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

 MarshallG's gear list:MarshallG's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM +2 more
1Dx4me Senior Member • Posts: 7,536
Re: 6D MKII Focus question
1

yeah, it looks like your lens is back-focusing but your shot #1 indicates otherwise i get the same with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx from time to time! i think if you shoot in burst, one or two of those shot will turn out just fine! i always press the shutter button half way a few times on the subject before press it all the way in to take the picture. it helps me most of the time.

-- hide signature --

You miss 100 percent of the shots you didn't take!!! "Wayne Gretzky"

G Dickson Contributing Member • Posts: 673
Re: 6D MKII Focus question
2

As others have said, make sure you are in servo AF (not the rather useless auto mode that supposedly detects movement).  The camera needs a certain amount of time to actually track focus as well.  Sometimes it feels instantaneous, other times less so.  I always map focus to the back button so that it is separate from the shutter and often I will sort of 'pump' the button a few times to get the camera to re focus.

The 6Dii is not bad at fairly fast action.

 G Dickson's gear list:G Dickson's gear list
Olympus TG-5 Canon EOS-1D Mark IV Olympus OM-D E-M10 Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Canon 6D Mark II +12 more
OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: 6D MKII Focus question

G Dickson wrote:

As others have said, make sure you are in servo AF (not the rather useless auto mode that supposedly detects movement). The camera needs a certain amount of time to actually track focus as well. Sometimes it feels instantaneous, other times less so. I always map focus to the back button so that it is separate from the shutter and often I will sort of 'pump' the button a few times to get the camera to re focus.

The 6Dii is not bad at fairly fast action.

I am always set to AI Servo and never auto mode.

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
MarshallG
MarshallG Veteran Member • Posts: 7,275
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!
1

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

 MarshallG's gear list:MarshallG's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM +2 more
1Dx4me Senior Member • Posts: 7,536
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

MarshallG wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

looking at the OP's, the 1st shot is focused but 2nd shot is not, although he claims that red square was right on the target and i believe him! like i said in my original post, it has happened to me numerous times, even with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras. one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

-- hide signature --

You miss 100 percent of the shots you didn't take!!! "Wayne Gretzky"

MarshallG
MarshallG Veteran Member • Posts: 7,275
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

You are describing One Shot (Single) Focus Mode, not Servo (Continuous) Mode. For a continuously moving horse, the Servo Mode is better.

There are times when a single point is the only way to go, but in shots like these, the horse is fairly low intrastate (unless you get in tighter). The single point can fail to find contrast. When you use several points, the central point is still prioritized, if it can attain focus. You should try this sometime and see.

 MarshallG's gear list:MarshallG's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM +2 more
OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

looking at the OP's, the 1st shot is focused but 2nd shot is not, although he claims that red square was right on the target and i believe him! like i said in my original post, it has happened to me numerous times, even with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras. one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

It was on target when I looked at my raw file but I just did not think I could post the raw file here or if the red square would show up. I have read in other posts that other photographers have the back focus problem during a shoot. Wildlife photographer Grant Atkinson is the one who told me single post focus is all you need. I guess everyone has there own way.

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

looking at the OP's, the 1st shot is focused but 2nd shot is not, although he claims that red square was right on the target and i believe him! like i said in my original post, it has happened to me numerous times, even with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras. one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

The photo that is nice and clear do you think the background being clear is to busy or it looks ok as is?

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
1Dx4me Senior Member • Posts: 7,536
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

Centofanti wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

looking at the OP's, the 1st shot is focused but 2nd shot is not, although he claims that red square was right on the target and i believe him! like i said in my original post, it has happened to me numerous times, even with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras. one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

The photo that is nice and clear do you think the background being clear is to busy or it looks ok as is?

background looks just the way it is, everything seems to be in focus! i don't know what you were expecting the background to look like

-- hide signature --

You miss 100 percent of the shots you didn't take!!! "Wayne Gretzky"

1Dx4me Senior Member • Posts: 7,536
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

MarshallG wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

You are describing One Shot (Single) Focus Mode, not Servo (Continuous) Mode. For a continuously moving horse, the Servo Mode is better.

i agree with your argument but i still do a few halfway press (shutter button) out of habit and then press fully, it doesn't hurt anything, it can be done quickly and it has worked for me, so far

There are times when a single point is the only way to go, but in shots like these, the horse is fairly low intrastate (unless you get in tighter). The single point can fail to find contrast. When you use several points, the central point is still prioritized, if it can attain focus. You should try this sometime and see.

several focus point around the main one (four point, for example), i still have noticed the focus can get confused at times and subject doesn't look as sharp as center focus point applied.

i think the main point here is "experience, experience". we all learn through experience more than just theory and listening to others, which is not but not is valuable as personal experience! also, i suggest to OP to go out and learn your camera and see how it behaves instead of going out and purchasing another camera if it was me i still have my 5D and 40D that i use on daily bases and learn their idiosyncrasies along with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras it is so interesting that when people commit a goof, they immediately reach the conclusion that, oh,it must be the camera peace.

-- hide signature --

You miss 100 percent of the shots you didn't take!!! "Wayne Gretzky"

OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

1Dx4me wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

looking at the OP's, the 1st shot is focused but 2nd shot is not, although he claims that red square was right on the target and i believe him! like i said in my original post, it has happened to me numerous times, even with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras. one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

The photo that is nice and clear do you think the background being clear is to busy or it looks ok as is?

background looks just the way it is, everything seems to be in focus! i don't know what you were expecting the background to look like

I just meant IYO does it look bad or should it have been blurry for the motion look?

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

You are describing One Shot (Single) Focus Mode, not Servo (Continuous) Mode. For a continuously moving horse, the Servo Mode is better.

i agree with your argument but i still do a few halfway press (shutter button) out of habit and then press fully, it doesn't hurt anything, it can be done quickly and it has worked for me, so far

There are times when a single point is the only way to go, but in shots like these, the horse is fairly low intrastate (unless you get in tighter). The single point can fail to find contrast. When you use several points, the central point is still prioritized, if it can attain focus. You should try this sometime and see.

several focus point around the main one (four point, for example), i still have noticed the focus can get confused at times and subject doesn't look as sharp as center focus point applied.

i think the main point here is "experience, experience". we all learn through experience more than just theory and listening to others, which is not but not is valuable as personal experience! also, i suggest to OP to go out and learn your camera and see how it behaves instead of going out and purchasing another camera if it was me i still have my 5D and 40D that i use on daily bases and learn their idiosyncrasies along with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras it is so interesting that when people commit a goof, they immediately reach the conclusion that, oh,it must be the camera peace.

Yes I get what you mean. My daughter will be participating in these types of shows and her stable wants some photos so I have been practicing on her lesson days. I have looked at other photographers shots and some backgrounds are clear just like the main subject focus and some are blurred to show motion. So yes I will keep practicing. My camera question was more towards the 6D MKII more noted for landscape/portraits so that's why I was asking about other bodies.

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
v30 Contributing Member • Posts: 698
Re: 6D MKII Focus question

A guess would be that the focus square left her face and hit the building in the background, maybe as the horse galloped she dropped below the focus square...

OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: 6D MKII Focus question

v30 wrote:

A guess would be that the focus square left her face and hit the building in the background, maybe as the horse galloped she dropped below the focus square...

That's possible never thought of that!

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
MarshallG
MarshallG Veteran Member • Posts: 7,275
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

Centofanti wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

Not trying to “yell,” I just want to make sure you understand: The focus system works by detecting contrast. The ideal contrast is a thick black diagonal line on a white background. The camera cannot focus where there is no contrast, and it needs to be like a line of contrast to work.

There are a few things I recommend:

1) Use a small cluster of several focus points and not only a single point

2) Use a longer lens (or longer focal length) to bring your subject closer/enlarge the subject. This will improve the quality of the photos and help with focus. In general, all the stuff surrounding your daughter and her horse isn’t doing much for the photo. I see you’re using a tele, but I can’t tell the focal length.

3) Use Servo (Continuous) focus mode, NOT the One Shot. Shoot in bursts.

4) Put a very mindful effort into holding the camera steady. Left hand BELOW the lens, and elbows against the body

Yes, the 5D Mark IV is better at this. My advice is to first make sure you’re hitting your camera’s limits before you upgrade. You have important technique issues to work on before we want to look at a camera upgrade, because a newer camera won’t change these requirements.

I see you have the 70-200 f/2.8 L IS. Maybe add the 1.4x teleconverter; I cant tell what focal lengths you’re shooting at, but I think you need to get in closer.

1.) Some others told me to only use single point and Auto ISO.

2.) The 70-200 is the longest lens I have unless I get a 1.4. Being daytime loosing the one F/stop won't matter

3.) I always use AI Servo

4.) The EXIF said I was at 170mm.

1) The person who told you to use single point was wrong. Give the camera a few more points to work with.

2) AutoISO is just an exposure choice. It has nothing to do with focus.

3) You can borrow or rent a teleconverter or rent the Canon 100-400mm. Less than $100 to try them. I think you need to get in a lot tighter with the lens to get good shots, and this will also enlarge your subjects, which will improve focus performance.

4) You can still consider 5D4. It does have better, faster AF. But you should get the technique down first or the 5D4 results will be no better than what you’re getting. Great results take work. Shoot a LOT. No matter how good you are, not all will be in perfect focus, etc.

5) If you have a consistent back focus, you can use the Microfocus adjustment feature to correct. But this only corrects a consistent problem.

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

looking at the OP's, the 1st shot is focused but 2nd shot is not, although he claims that red square was right on the target and i believe him! like i said in my original post, it has happened to me numerous times, even with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras. one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

The photo that is nice and clear do you think the background being clear is to busy or it looks ok as is?

background looks just the way it is, everything seems to be in focus! i don't know what you were expecting the background to look like

I just meant IYO does it look bad or should it have been blurry for the motion look?

It’s difficult to do a hand-held motion pan that blurs the background and keeps the subject sharp. It takes mastery, that’s for sure.
If it were me, I’d crop a lot of that background out, and (personally) what I’d try to do is use the fast aperture and shoot the subject against the greenery, like I did with this bass player.

I like the way the 70-200 treats the background here. I think it would be a good technique for what your shots. And try a few slow shutter speed pans every time, too. I just think it will take you a few tries until you’re happy with them

 MarshallG's gear list:MarshallG's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM +2 more
1Dx4me Senior Member • Posts: 7,536
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

Centofanti wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

You are describing One Shot (Single) Focus Mode, not Servo (Continuous) Mode. For a continuously moving horse, the Servo Mode is better.

i agree with your argument but i still do a few halfway press (shutter button) out of habit and then press fully, it doesn't hurt anything, it can be done quickly and it has worked for me, so far

There are times when a single point is the only way to go, but in shots like these, the horse is fairly low intrastate (unless you get in tighter). The single point can fail to find contrast. When you use several points, the central point is still prioritized, if it can attain focus. You should try this sometime and see.

several focus point around the main one (four point, for example), i still have noticed the focus can get confused at times and subject doesn't look as sharp as center focus point applied.

i think the main point here is "experience, experience". we all learn through experience more than just theory and listening to others, which is not but not is valuable as personal experience! also, i suggest to OP to go out and learn your camera and see how it behaves instead of going out and purchasing another camera if it was me i still have my 5D and 40D that i use on daily bases and learn their idiosyncrasies along with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras it is so interesting that when people commit a goof, they immediately reach the conclusion that, oh,it must be the camera peace.

Yes I get what you mean. My daughter will be participating in these types of shows and her stable wants some photos so I have been practicing on her lesson days. I have looked at other photographers shots and some backgrounds are clear just like the main subject focus and some are blurred to show motion. So yes I will keep practicing. My camera question was more towards the 6D MKII more noted for landscape/portraits so that's why I was asking about other bodies.

i think 6D2 is a capable camera and can do thing you are interested an very easily. in your 1st shot, everything looks ok, no problem! also, as i have noticed, it must have been midday because the sun light seems to be shining straight from the top. if that is the case, then it doesn't help the photo quality! that was just an observation and has nothing to do with your out of focus shot (#2)! as i have suggested, make sure you photograph the action from all different angles and find out which looks the best and try to be creative and pay attention to what else is in the frame and avoid including things that spoil the shot good luck.

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You miss 100 percent of the shots you didn't take!!! "Wayne Gretzky"

OP Centofanti Forum Member • Posts: 63
Re: Contrast, Contrast, CONTRAST!!!

1Dx4me wrote:

Centofanti wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

1Dx4me wrote:

MarshallG wrote:

i use single focus point all the time, especially for birding, and i don't see any issue with it! as soon as you connect it to the target, it can be very accurate, IMO.

one thing that helps me is to press the shutter button half way a few times and then press it all the way down and take the photo! as i am sure you know this, pressing the shutter button beeps and confirms the "Focus" and ready to shoot with accurate focus.

You are describing One Shot (Single) Focus Mode, not Servo (Continuous) Mode. For a continuously moving horse, the Servo Mode is better.

i agree with your argument but i still do a few halfway press (shutter button) out of habit and then press fully, it doesn't hurt anything, it can be done quickly and it has worked for me, so far

There are times when a single point is the only way to go, but in shots like these, the horse is fairly low intrastate (unless you get in tighter). The single point can fail to find contrast. When you use several points, the central point is still prioritized, if it can attain focus. You should try this sometime and see.

several focus point around the main one (four point, for example), i still have noticed the focus can get confused at times and subject doesn't look as sharp as center focus point applied.

i think the main point here is "experience, experience". we all learn through experience more than just theory and listening to others, which is not but not is valuable as personal experience! also, i suggest to OP to go out and learn your camera and see how it behaves instead of going out and purchasing another camera if it was me i still have my 5D and 40D that i use on daily bases and learn their idiosyncrasies along with my 1dmk4 and 1Dx cameras it is so interesting that when people commit a goof, they immediately reach the conclusion that, oh,it must be the camera peace.

Yes I get what you mean. My daughter will be participating in these types of shows and her stable wants some photos so I have been practicing on her lesson days. I have looked at other photographers shots and some backgrounds are clear just like the main subject focus and some are blurred to show motion. So yes I will keep practicing. My camera question was more towards the 6D MKII more noted for landscape/portraits so that's why I was asking about other bodies.

i think 6D2 is a capable camera and can do thing you are interested an very easily. in your 1st shot, everything looks ok, no problem! also, as i have noticed, it must have been midday because the sun light seems to be shining straight from the top. if that is the case, then it doesn't help the photo quality! that was just an observation and has nothing to do with your out of focus shot (#2)! as i have suggested, make sure you photograph the action from all different angles and find out which looks the best and try to be creative and pay attention to what else is in the frame and avoid including things that spoil the shot good luck.

Thanks for all the tips!

 Centofanti's gear list:Centofanti's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L II USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM
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