Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

Started Jun 26, 2019 | Questions
samdesignsthat New Member • Posts: 8
Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

Hi everyone,

I've been gazing at buying my first camera, after doing a bunch of projects off rented material.

The Sony A7iii is the chosen one, as I find myself doing equal amounts of photo and video. The "worst" part about it is: the sheer volume of lenses you can choose from, under a limited budget.

I am somewhat open to anything, but after using Zeiss glass with Canon cameras I am gravitating toward their Batis series.

On the other end, I'm frightened that being locked to a prime as an only lens for a while might be risky. Long story short, I'm absolutely torn and can't make my mind about this.

I can only afford one of the following (or similarly priced lenses): Batis 40mm, Batis 85mm, Sony Zeiss 55mm, Tamron 28 to 75mm.

Would it be better to start with a prime right away or go for the zoom and go for the primes once I can afford them? Would the color reproduction and sharpness of the Batis lenses worth the trade off for a zoom? For those that found themselves in similar situations, or own any of this material, what are your thoughts?

Thank you so much!

Edit I mostly do short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography.

dkloi Senior Member • Posts: 1,955
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii
5

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

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Entropy512 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,220
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

dkloi wrote:

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

A somewhat more expensive alternative which may or may not be in the OP's budget is the 24-105G - it's a solid lens.  Slower, but more versatile as far as zoom ranges.

The OP also mentions using Canon bodies in the past - the question then is:

1)  What Canon glass do they have

2)  Does their budget for a new body/glass assume selling the old Canon gear, or is that still around?

The OP might be well served by a Metabones if they have a strong Canon glass investment.

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bsas
bsas Contributing Member • Posts: 620
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

samdesignsthat wrote:

Hi everyone,

I've been gazing at buying my first camera, after doing a bunch of projects off rented material.

The Sony A7iii is the chosen one, as I find myself doing equal amounts of photo and video. The "worst" part about it is: the sheer volume of lenses you can choose from, under a limited budget.

I am somewhat open to anything, but after using Zeiss glass with Canon cameras I am gravitating toward their Batis series.

On the other end, I'm frightened that being locked to a prime as an only lens for a while might be risky. Long story short, I'm absolutely torn and can't make my mind about this.

I can only afford one of the following (or similarly priced lenses): Batis 40mm, Batis 85mm, Sony Zeiss 55mm, Tamron 28 to 75mm.

Would it be better to start with a prime right away or go for the zoom and go for the primes once I can afford them? Would the color reproduction and sharpness of the Batis lenses worth the trade off for a zoom? For those that found themselves in similar situations, or own any of this material, what are your thoughts?

Thank you so much!

Edit I mostly do short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography.

Tamron 28-75 all the way, believe me, it is an amazing versatile and sharp lens, super useful for A LOT of jobs and stuff.

Primes are always cool but too specific. I would buy the Tamron, use for a while, discover which focal length you use the most and then invest on that specific prime...

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bsas
bsas Contributing Member • Posts: 620
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

Entropy512 wrote:

dkloi wrote:

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

A somewhat more expensive alternative which may or may not be in the OP's budget is the 24-105G - it's a solid lens. Slower, but more versatile as far as zoom ranges.

The OP also mentions using Canon bodies in the past - the question then is:

1) What Canon glass do they have

2) Does their budget for a new body/glass assume selling the old Canon gear, or is that still around?

The OP might be well served by a Metabones if they have a strong Canon glass investment.

I honestly would never get the Metabones and I would get the Sigma MC-11 for $150 (very common deal that comes and goes) instead. Metabones is overpriced and I honestly think that the Sigma is the perfect Canon adapter, and works better.

But, again, I also honestly think that as the "first lens" I would never go with an adapter lens. You loose a lot of the "power" of the camera body that way.

Sony 24-105 or Tamron 28-75 are the best choices. It is more like if you care more about the focal lengths or the aperture. I am more concerned on the aperture because I think it gives me more options than the extra focal length, but, it is me

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Brad Nishida Contributing Member • Posts: 829
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii
1

Unless you know exactly what focal lengths you would need for your events you will want a zoom.  The Sigma 28-75 would be my choice unless you do daylight events only.

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poipoipoi_2016 Contributing Member • Posts: 936
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii
1

samdesignsthat wrote:

Hi everyone,

I've been gazing at buying my first camera, after doing a bunch of projects off rented material.

The Sony A7iii is the chosen one, as I find myself doing equal amounts of photo and video. The "worst" part about it is: the sheer volume of lenses you can choose from, under a limited budget.

I am somewhat open to anything, but after using Zeiss glass with Canon cameras I am gravitating toward their Batis series.

On the other end, I'm frightened that being locked to a prime as an only lens for a while might be risky. Long story short, I'm absolutely torn and can't make my mind about this.

I can only afford one of the following (or similarly priced lenses): Batis 40mm, Batis 85mm, Sony Zeiss 55mm, Tamron 28 to 75mm.

Would it be better to start with a prime right away or go for the zoom and go for the primes once I can afford them? Would the color reproduction and sharpness of the Batis lenses worth the trade off for a zoom? For those that found themselves in similar situations, or own any of this material, what are your thoughts?

Thank you so much!

Edit I mostly do short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography.

Do you always 100% of the time control where you stand and how big your subject is?  If not, go for the zoom first.  The two basic options are the 24-105/4 (My choice.  Even if it's a stop too slow for great indoors photography) and the Tamron 28-75/2.8.  Because that gives you a 24, a 28, a 35, a 50, a 70, and 85, and a 105 in one lens.  
Then figure out where you shoot from, pick up the primes that match that, and if your tax returns are very kind, grab the 16-35/2.8 as more or less the ultimate (albeit slightly heavy) street lens. Especially when paired with the mid-zoom or a couple of fast mid/tele primes (16-35 + 55 + 85 is good).

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Entropy512 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,220
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

bsas wrote:

Entropy512 wrote:

dkloi wrote:

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

A somewhat more expensive alternative which may or may not be in the OP's budget is the 24-105G - it's a solid lens. Slower, but more versatile as far as zoom ranges.

The OP also mentions using Canon bodies in the past - the question then is:

1) What Canon glass do they have

2) Does their budget for a new body/glass assume selling the old Canon gear, or is that still around?

The OP might be well served by a Metabones if they have a strong Canon glass investment.

I honestly would never get the Metabones and I would get the Sigma MC-11 for $150 (very common deal that comes and goes) instead. Metabones is overpriced and I honestly think that the Sigma is the perfect Canon adapter, and works better.

Metabones officially supports non-SGV lenses.  Sigma does not.

It's as simple as that.  If you cheap out by using an adapter in a non-intended configuration, you WILL pay the consequences - like anyone who relied on "incompatible lens fallback" and accidentally flashed firmware 1.05 - they were hosed for more than 1-2 months, and for the majority of that time, Sigma tech support was telling anyone that complained about the 1.05 regressions, "We don't support that, so tough luck".

Metabones, on the other hand, has almost ZERO risk of getting stuck with a firmware update regression breaking you, because they officially support reverting firmware in these scenarios and now provide EVERY firmware release from the preceding two years with any current firmware download.  They'll also treat a report of a regression as a valid bug report, unlike Sigma who will ignore complaints of regressions in "unsupported" functionality until the Internet whining gets loud enough.

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bsas
bsas Contributing Member • Posts: 620
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

Entropy512 wrote:

bsas wrote:

Entropy512 wrote:

dkloi wrote:

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

A somewhat more expensive alternative which may or may not be in the OP's budget is the 24-105G - it's a solid lens. Slower, but more versatile as far as zoom ranges.

The OP also mentions using Canon bodies in the past - the question then is:

1) What Canon glass do they have

2) Does their budget for a new body/glass assume selling the old Canon gear, or is that still around?

The OP might be well served by a Metabones if they have a strong Canon glass investment.

I honestly would never get the Metabones and I would get the Sigma MC-11 for $150 (very common deal that comes and goes) instead. Metabones is overpriced and I honestly think that the Sigma is the perfect Canon adapter, and works better.

Metabones officially supports non-SGV lenses. Sigma does not.

It's as simple as that. If you cheap out by using an adapter in a non-intended configuration, you WILL pay the consequences - like anyone who relied on "incompatible lens fallback" and accidentally flashed firmware 1.05 - they were hosed for more than 1-2 months, and for the majority of that time, Sigma tech support was telling anyone that complained about the 1.05 regressions, "We don't support that, so tough luck".

Metabones, on the other hand, has almost ZERO risk of getting stuck with a firmware update regression breaking you, because they officially support reverting firmware in these scenarios and now provide EVERY firmware release from the preceding two years with any current firmware download. They'll also treat a report of a regression as a valid bug report, unlike Sigma who will ignore complaints of regressions in "unsupported" functionality until the Internet whining gets loud enough.

OK, you prefer Metabones, I prefer Sigma MC-11, and I understand your reasoning. I am not "cheaping out", I tested BOTH with my EF lenses and the Sigma just worked better, then I sold my Metabones.

I also understand that Metabones "must" somehow support multiple lenses and Sigma is just required to support Sigma lenses, so, if this is an issue for you, I can understand that too.

But, again, going back to the OP, I would NEVER suggest adapting lenses as my "first lens" for a Sony camera. Get a native lens and explore all that the camera can do.

If you DO have a bunch of EF glass already, OK, get the adapter. But buying an EF adapter to "buy" and EF lens sounds reverse logic for me. If you want to use EF lenses in a mirrorless system, just get the Canon R stuff (that requires to be 100% compatible by factory, even better than Metabones).

Again, don't go for adapters unless you ALREADY have the legacy glass. It is counter-productive...

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bob13bob Contributing Member • Posts: 954
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

do not get the 55 1.8. the 50 1.8 is very underrated and sharp enough for the a73. much better value.

either get 50 or samyang 35 2.8 for run and gun light weight setup.    I don't like zooms as they are too big.

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my equipment: a7iii. NATIVE: sony 50 1.8. samyang 35 2.8. ADAPTED: sigma mc11 adapter. canon 85mm 1.8. sigma (canon) 12-24 4-5.6. canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 is ii.

yangz Regular Member • Posts: 151
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

Tamron 28-75 or FE 24-105

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OP samdesignsthat New Member • Posts: 8
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

bsas wrote:

Entropy512 wrote:

bsas wrote:

Entropy512 wrote:

dkloi wrote:

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

A somewhat more expensive alternative which may or may not be in the OP's budget is the 24-105G - it's a solid lens. Slower, but more versatile as far as zoom ranges.

The OP also mentions using Canon bodies in the past - the question then is:

1) What Canon glass do they have

2) Does their budget for a new body/glass assume selling the old Canon gear, or is that still around?

The OP might be well served by a Metabones if they have a strong Canon glass investment.

I honestly would never get the Metabones and I would get the Sigma MC-11 for $150 (very common deal that comes and goes) instead. Metabones is overpriced and I honestly think that the Sigma is the perfect Canon adapter, and works better.

Metabones officially supports non-SGV lenses. Sigma does not.

It's as simple as that. If you cheap out by using an adapter in a non-intended configuration, you WILL pay the consequences - like anyone who relied on "incompatible lens fallback" and accidentally flashed firmware 1.05 - they were hosed for more than 1-2 months, and for the majority of that time, Sigma tech support was telling anyone that complained about the 1.05 regressions, "We don't support that, so tough luck".

Metabones, on the other hand, has almost ZERO risk of getting stuck with a firmware update regression breaking you, because they officially support reverting firmware in these scenarios and now provide EVERY firmware release from the preceding two years with any current firmware download. They'll also treat a report of a regression as a valid bug report, unlike Sigma who will ignore complaints of regressions in "unsupported" functionality until the Internet whining gets loud enough.

OK, you prefer Metabones, I prefer Sigma MC-11, and I understand your reasoning. I am not "cheaping out", I tested BOTH with my EF lenses and the Sigma just worked better, then I sold my Metabones.

I also understand that Metabones "must" somehow support multiple lenses and Sigma is just required to support Sigma lenses, so, if this is an issue for you, I can understand that too.

But, again, going back to the OP, I would NEVER suggest adapting lenses as my "first lens" for a Sony camera. Get a native lens and explore all that the camera can do.

If you DO have a bunch of EF glass already, OK, get the adapter. But buying an EF adapter to "buy" and EF lens sounds reverse logic for me. If you want to use EF lenses in a mirrorless system, just get the Canon R stuff (that requires to be 100% compatible by factory, even better than Metabones).

Again, don't go for adapters unless you ALREADY have the legacy glass. It is counter-productive...

I got so overwhelmed by the fast answers; thank you so much everyone!

Let me provide some context: I only own a Canon 50mm 1.8, which I mostly use on rented Canon APS-C bodies or my 35mm analog Canon. Comparing prices with adapters, it didn't seem wise to grab a Metabones or the Sigma adapter, when I can get a cheaper prime for about the same price.

I've only used a 50mm on a full frame body in a project a couple of years ago, everything other than that was on cropped sensors. Thus my inclination toward an 85mm. What got me considering primes vs zoom was: quality and punchiness of the color, sharpness, wide aperture and native auto focus that Sony/Zeiss lenses provide

For most of the situations I find myself in, I have the space to move around and get closer (or further) to my subject, which sort of invalidates the premise of a zoom. I also find that 2.8 might be too slow for my personal taste. I've done enough projects on a Canon kit lens to realize I would end up between 25 and 35mm cropped most of the time, making the 40 to 50mm my "standard".

Essentially, narrowed it down to:

  1. Zeiss 55mm
    Nifty fifty focal length and what seems to be the gold standard for Sony quality.
  2. Batis 40mm
    The close focus feature is what got me the most, in addition to everything this series already provides. From what I've seen online, it's a good compromise between 35 and 55mm, and it seems to be actually closer to what our eyes can perceive in the real word opposed to 50mm.
  3. Batis 85mm
    Same praise for its features as the 40mm, but considered due to the fact I've been using a 50mm on cropped sensors.
  4. Sony 50mm
    This would be the Sony equivalent to my Canon, but I haven't seen reviews/footage on this one as much as the ones mentioned above.

I'm gravitating toward the 40mm and then building the 18mm + 40mm + 85mm combo, as it would cover everything. Super 35 mode would also be an option for video if needed. Thoughts?

Thank you so much once again!

Entropy512 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,220
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

samdesignsthat wrote:

I got so overwhelmed by the fast answers; thank you so much everyone!

Let me provide some context: I only own a Canon 50mm 1.8, which I mostly use on rented Canon APS-C bodies or my 35mm analog Canon. Comparing prices with adapters, it didn't seem wise to grab a Metabones or the Sigma adapter, when I can get a cheaper prime for about the same price.

Is that an STM50, or older 50?  If it's pre-STM, it's basically not adaptable.

I've only used a 50mm on a full frame body in a project a couple of years ago, everything other than that was on cropped sensors. Thus my inclination toward an 85mm. What got me considering primes vs zoom was: quality and punchiness of the color, sharpness, wide aperture and native auto focus that Sony/Zeiss lenses provide

For most of the situations I find myself in, I have the space to move around and get closer (or further) to my subject, which sort of invalidates the premise of a zoom. I also find that 2.8 might be too slow for my personal taste. I've done enough projects on a Canon kit lens to realize I would end up between 25 and 35mm cropped most of the time, making the 40 to 50mm my "standard".

Essentially, narrowed it down to:

  1. Zeiss 55mm
    Nifty fifty focal length and what seems to be the gold standard for Sony quality.
  2. Batis 40mm
    The close focus feature is what got me the most, in addition to everything this series already provides. From what I've seen online, it's a good compromise between 35 and 55mm, and it seems to be actually closer to what our eyes can perceive in the real word opposed to 50mm.
  3. Batis 85mm
    Same praise for its features as the 40mm, but considered due to the fact I've been using a 50mm on cropped sensors.
  4. Sony 50mm
    This would be the Sony equivalent to my Canon, but I haven't seen reviews/footage on this one as much as the ones mentioned above.

I'm gravitating toward the 40mm and then building the 18mm + 40mm + 85mm combo, as it would cover everything. Super 35 mode would also be an option for video if needed. Thoughts?

Thank you so much once again!

It seems like you're spending quite a bit of money for all that Batis glass, your budget concerns have me thinking something like the 24-105G or Tamron 28-75 might be more suitable for you.

Just as a reference for what I have in my setup:

A7III, Metabones IV for all Canon glass listed below except for one example.  All EF glass was actually purchased AFTER I started shooting Sony - I've never owned a Canon body.

Sony 24-105G - my only native FF lens

Canon 50/1.8 STM - solid lens, not worth rebuying native for my use cases, probably would have bought the FE50 had it existed when I bought the 50STM though

Canon EF85/1.8 USM - great lens, I probably would have gone for the FE85 had it existed then

Tamron 70-300SP - I bought this even after the FE70-300G came out.  The Tamron seems pretty close in optical quality and it's so much cheaper that even if you pay for Metabones, the total cost is less.

Samyang/Rokinon 100/2.8 macro in EF mount - I bought EF for the resale value.  It's a manual focus/manual aperture lens so works with any adapter with no penalty.

Sigma 150-600C - The only lens I use the MC-11 with.  I would not recommend this as a new purchase, go for the Sony 200-600 instead.  This is likely one of the few lenses in my Canon EF list that I am likely to sell and rebuy as native.

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dkloi Senior Member • Posts: 1,955
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

Instead of the Batis 85mm, consider the Sony 85mm/1.8 FE (I have this). AF is good, sharp, acceptable bokeh (at least to me), and cheaper.

I've read that the AF of the Sony 50mm/1.8 FE can be a bit noisy (not good for video use with on-board mics) and can lag in low light.

Alternatively, rent some glass before committing to buying a lens since you are still uncertain. Or buy a lens but supplement it on jobs with rented lenses to fill in gaps.

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bsas
bsas Contributing Member • Posts: 620
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

(...) making the 40 to 50mm my "standard" (...)

Since you know you would be happy with the 40-50mm range, then I would go that way:

1) The Sony 50mm is very underrated. It is really good and really sharp, and if you are patient, you can find it or around $150-$200 and even if you "upgrade" to a Batis 40mm or a Zeiss 55mm, it is worth as an extra/backup because it's small and light and very good for travel (exactly like the Canon 50mm f1.8);

2) If you want to go 85mm, go with the Sony instead of the Batis. It is far cheaper and in a lot of tests superior.

3) The 55mm is a staple on sharpness. I never tried one so I personally don't know how much better it is compared to the 50mm Sony. It should be better :D. But, again, even if you "upgrade" to the Zeiss later, I honestly think it is worth it to have the 50mm cheap lens as a backup and for light travel.

4) Do not underestimate the Samyang 35mm f2.8. It is an amazingly useful, light and cheap lens, and it makes the A7iii a perfect street and travel camera (actually better and lighter than a lot of m4/3 or APSC camera+lens combos).

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selected answer This post was selected as the answer by the original poster.
OP samdesignsthat New Member • Posts: 8
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii
1

bsas wrote:

(...) making the 40 to 50mm my "standard" (...)

Since you know you would be happy with the 40-50mm range, then I would go that way:

1) The Sony 50mm is very underrated. It is really good and really sharp, and if you are patient, you can find it or around $150-$200 and even if you "upgrade" to a Batis 40mm or a Zeiss 55mm, it is worth as an extra/backup because it's small and light and very good for travel (exactly like the Canon 50mm f1.8);

2) If you want to go 85mm, go with the Sony instead of the Batis. It is far cheaper and in a lot of tests superior.

3) The 55mm is a staple on sharpness. I never tried one so I personally don't know how much better it is compared to the 50mm Sony. It should be better :D. But, again, even if you "upgrade" to the Zeiss later, I honestly think it is worth it to have the 50mm cheap lens as a backup and for light travel.

4) Do not underestimate the Samyang 35mm f2.8. It is an amazingly useful, light and cheap lens, and it makes the A7iii a perfect street and travel camera (actually better and lighter than a lot of m4/3 or APSC camera+lens combos).

After a couple of weeks of research, I found that the 35mm + 55mm + 85mm might be a better place to start, as far as "bang for the buck" goes. Thank you so much for your help!

Jojophotomo Regular Member • Posts: 201
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

bsas wrote:

Entropy512 wrote:

dkloi wrote:

Get the Tamron 28-75mm/2.8 to start off as your only lens, then add to that when you get the funds and know what you need to supplement the zoom. Can't think you would be able to effectively cover all the things you mention (short films, some medium sized event coverage in both photo and video, and the casual street/travel photography) with a single prime.

A somewhat more expensive alternative which may or may not be in the OP's budget is the 24-105G - it's a solid lens. Slower, but more versatile as far as zoom ranges.

The OP also mentions using Canon bodies in the past - the question then is:

1) What Canon glass do they have

2) Does their budget for a new body/glass assume selling the old Canon gear, or is that still around?

The OP might be well served by a Metabones if they have a strong Canon glass investment.

I honestly would never get the Metabones and I would get the Sigma MC-11 for $150 (very common deal that comes and goes) instead. Metabones is overpriced and I honestly think that the Sigma is the perfect Canon adapter, and works better.

But, again, I also honestly think that as the "first lens" I would never go with an adapter lens. You loose a lot of the "power" of the camera body that way.

Sony 24-105 or Tamron 28-75 are the best choices. It is more like if you care more about the focal lengths or the aperture. I am more concerned on the aperture because I think it gives me more options than the extra focal length, but, it is me

DPReview actually did a comparison of the Metabones IV (I think as the most current at the time) vs the MC-11, and they found the MB IV works faster with Canon glass and MC-11 works better for Sigma glass.

You can find the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FVCHHRD7Y8

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British Jonathan
British Jonathan Regular Member • Posts: 157
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii
1

dkloi wrote:

Instead of the Batis 85mm, consider the Sony 85mm/1.8 FE (I have this). AF is good, sharp, acceptable bokeh (at least to me), and cheaper.

Seconded and indeed thirded.

Also, if you can stretch to it, that 85 plus the 16-35 2.8 GM is such a solid combo.

 British Jonathan's gear list:British Jonathan's gear list
Sony a7 III Sony FE 85mm F1.8 Tamron 28-75mm F2.8 III Sigma 35mm F1.2 DG DN
Paul Barnard
Paul Barnard Veteran Member • Posts: 3,754
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

samdesignsthat wrote:

The "worst" part about it is: the sheer volume of lenses you can choose from, under a limited budget.

Looks like Sony has come of age. I think this is the first time I’ve seen the problem stated as too many lens choices. Until last year the common wisdom was that Sony had no lens choice.

to your question though Sam. As you will see from my gear list I like primes and I like the Batis primes they are fantastic lenses but unless you’re very ‘old school’ or simply dedicated to a specific style one prime can be limiting. The flexibility of a zoom as your only lens will be very welcome in many many situations. The recommendation of the Tamaron is a good one. If you can run to it the 24-105 is a fantastic lens. I would jump in with either of these, or even dare I say it, the kit lens. After you have been shooting for a while and skipping a coffee every week to build a lens fund see what focal length you have used most then jump in with a prime of that length.

 Paul Barnard's gear list:Paul Barnard's gear list
Sony a7R III Sony FE 55mm F1.8 Sony FE 70-200 F4 Zeiss Batis 25mm F2 Sony 1.4x Teleconverter (2016) +5 more
DenImage Senior Member • Posts: 3,685
Re: Multiple Options for a First Lens paired with a Sony A7iii

bob13bob wrote:

do not get the 55 1.8. the 50 1.8 is very underrated and sharp enough for the a73. much better value.

Really?

The Sony FE 50mm f1.8 is a terrible lens.

Slow and noisy AF motor, the barrel extends when focusing, soft in the edges/corners at wider apertures, and it has terrible LoCA.

The Zony FE 55mm is an amazing lens with a great reputation. Its only flaws are bad LoCa and occasionally noticeable onion ring bokeh.

Den

 DenImage's gear list:DenImage's gear list
Sony a7R II Sony a7 III Sigma 8mm F3.5 EX DG Circular Fisheye Sony FE 55mm F1.8 Sony FE 100mm F2.8 GM +7 more
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