Everyone Using MFT

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
Photo Pete Veteran Member • Posts: 4,812
Re: Everyone Using MFT

davidedric wrote:

James Stirling wrote:

Model Mike wrote:

Photo Pete wrote:

The only problem with this story is that proper use of a tripod will achieve better sharpness than not using one, no matter what system you shoot.

Not sure that applies so much these days, given the excellent stabilisation available on modern cameras. Use of the tripod is more about maintaining and optimising composition, and for multiple-frame images e.g. HDR and sensor shift.

Mike, though the stabilisation systems are great I still think that if you want the absolute best quality tripods are the way to go. Though many here claim to take "sharp" multi-second hand-held shots I have never seen one posted that I would call critically sharp, certainly it is miraculous to get anything at those crazy speeds but not really sharp . Stick your camera on a decent tripod, set delay , IBIS off etc , set your lens to its optimum aperture and then compare to a hand-held shot using multiple stops of IBIS , even I get hand-held shots sharp at 1/16000th

Not if you're on a boat

With a good solid tripod the boat would be perfectly sharp

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Have Fun
Photo Pete

bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 62,045
Re: Everyone Using MFT
1

davidedric wrote:

James Stirling wrote:

Model Mike wrote:

Photo Pete wrote:

The only problem with this story is that proper use of a tripod will achieve better sharpness than not using one, no matter what system you shoot.

Not sure that applies so much these days, given the excellent stabilisation available on modern cameras. Use of the tripod is more about maintaining and optimising composition, and for multiple-frame images e.g. HDR and sensor shift.

Mike, though the stabilisation systems are great I still think that if you want the absolute best quality tripods are the way to go. Though many here claim to take "sharp" multi-second hand-held shots I have never seen one posted that I would call critically sharp, certainly it is miraculous to get anything at those crazy speeds but not really sharp . Stick your camera on a decent tripod, set delay , IBIS off etc , set your lens to its optimum aperture and then compare to a hand-held shot using multiple stops of IBIS , even I get hand-held shots sharp at 1/16000th

Not if you're on a boat

You just have to remember to bering along a drill. Three holes judiciously placed in the bottom of the boat, a tripod with long legs and you're good to go.

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263, look deader.

bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 62,045
Re: MFT is the lightest and smallest professional system
1

Tommi K1 wrote:

Humansvillian wrote:

  • Tommi K1 wrote:

Colin Smith1 wrote:

I have just returned from a photo trip to Nome, Alaska. Everyone on the trip, including the guide, was using Olympus EM-1X and one Panasonic MFT. There was only one guy on the trip still using a huge Nikon body and 600MM lens.

That is difficult to believe, unless it was a m4/3 club own trip.

What’s surprising is the one guy with the large gear.

Camera bodies are lens holders.

The smallest professional cameras take MFT lenses.

The smallest pro lenses are MFT. A 300mm MFT lens replaces a 600mm FF.

Flying thousands of miles to Alaska and hiring a boat and guide to take photographs costs a whole lot of money.

What’s three grand, for such a group that decides that’s how they want to spend their money?

They can stay home, and use FF cameras and lenses.

Alaska is cold and wet and a small professional camera is at a premium.

First we need to accept that any lens or any body is professional capable.

But other question is that how many camera combos you can make that are highly weather sealed?

Now you start to do drop many professional gear as most are not weather sealed up to task of outdoors use in harsh conditions, that anyways very few are ready to face. Not a normal light rain but a pouring water for weeks, where you have everything, every crack in your body wet. And your challenge is to keep front element dry... Nothing else.

The problem with that is that there is very little good data on what is well weather sealed and what isn't. Also, about what kind of weather it's sealed against.

-- hide signature --

263, look deader.

OP Colin Smith1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,052
Re: Everyone Using MFT

New Day Rising wrote:

I guess people who go on trips like yours are the same people who can afford E-M1Xs and 600mm primes. Funny to think the cost of those E-M1X bodies would have paid my rent for about two-thirds of the year. With lenses, the whole year or longer. I'm just pointing out relativities here - this is in the realm of cameras for the one percenters, not the masses.

I saw an E-M1X in a shop once. Not in the real world. On one of my walks with the local bushwalking club I still owned am E-M1i. Two others on that walk had OM-Ds (10s, I think). I haven't seen any mirrorless on any other walk - all phones, compacts and once a DSLR. A friend of mine owns an EM-10.

Other than those times, I have rarely seen a micro four-thirds camera in use. I take note when I am in areas with lots of tourists. Once or twice I've seen a Panasonic, once or twice a Fuji. Sony A7x and A6xxx are more common. The occasional bridge camera and compact p&s.

Otherwise it's all Canon and Nikon DSLRs, mostly entry levels with kit zooms but I do see the odd higher level body and lens. And phones of course. Lots of phones.

You betcha!

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Colin Smith

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OP Colin Smith1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,052
Re: The big decider
1

NCV wrote:

It would be more interesting to see the pictures everybody produced. That is the only factor that counts.

Perhaps your 84 year old friend got some nicer shots in the end with his tripod mounted camera.

I often take FF and M43 and use both when I am documenting something. I just use the gear that is is more appropriate for the situation.

Except for the shots the missed while he was setting up that massive tripod!

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Colin Smith

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Wu Jiaqiu
Wu Jiaqiu Forum Pro • Posts: 24,560
Re: MFT is the lightest and smallest professional system
1

bobn2 wrote:

Tommi K1 wrote:

Humansvillian wrote:

  • Tommi K1 wrote:

Colin Smith1 wrote:

I have just returned from a photo trip to Nome, Alaska. Everyone on the trip, including the guide, was using Olympus EM-1X and one Panasonic MFT. There was only one guy on the trip still using a huge Nikon body and 600MM lens.

That is difficult to believe, unless it was a m4/3 club own trip.

What’s surprising is the one guy with the large gear.

Camera bodies are lens holders.

The smallest professional cameras take MFT lenses.

The smallest pro lenses are MFT. A 300mm MFT lens replaces a 600mm FF.

Flying thousands of miles to Alaska and hiring a boat and guide to take photographs costs a whole lot of money.

What’s three grand, for such a group that decides that’s how they want to spend their money?

They can stay home, and use FF cameras and lenses.

Alaska is cold and wet and a small professional camera is at a premium.

First we need to accept that any lens or any body is professional capable.

But other question is that how many camera combos you can make that are highly weather sealed?

Now you start to do drop many professional gear as most are not weather sealed up to task of outdoors use in harsh conditions, that anyways very few are ready to face. Not a normal light rain but a pouring water for weeks, where you have everything, every crack in your body wet. And your challenge is to keep front element dry... Nothing else.

The problem with that is that there is very little good data on what is well weather sealed and what isn't. Also, about what kind of weather it's sealed against.

all my cameras work brilliantly in at least 1 kind of weather, therefore they are weather sealed

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OP Colin Smith1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,052
Re: What MFT lenses did the guide use?

Humansvillian wrote:

An enterprising Alaskan hired out himself and his boat to five pilgrims, from afar.

The guide has a reason to own the latest and best smallest professional camera in the world today.

He’s the professional.

But what lenses, did the guide use?

Same as I had.  Olympus 300 F4 and teleconverter and 12-100 and 7-14 Olympus.

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Colin Smith

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OP Colin Smith1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,052
Re: Everyone Using MFT
6

rjensen11 wrote:

I assume this wasn't the same trip to Nome: https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/events/2019/workshop-partner-event-birds-and-musk-oxen-of-nome-alaska

Nope, it was a Joe VanOs trip.

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Colin Smith

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Steve Rushing Contributing Member • Posts: 718
I wasn't but will on several upcoming (n/t)

No text.

bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 62,045
Re: MFT is the lightest and smallest professional system

Wu Jiaqiu wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

Tommi K1 wrote:

Humansvillian wrote:

  • Tommi K1 wrote:

Colin Smith1 wrote:

I have just returned from a photo trip to Nome, Alaska. Everyone on the trip, including the guide, was using Olympus EM-1X and one Panasonic MFT. There was only one guy on the trip still using a huge Nikon body and 600MM lens.

That is difficult to believe, unless it was a m4/3 club own trip.

What’s surprising is the one guy with the large gear.

Camera bodies are lens holders.

The smallest professional cameras take MFT lenses.

The smallest pro lenses are MFT. A 300mm MFT lens replaces a 600mm FF.

Flying thousands of miles to Alaska and hiring a boat and guide to take photographs costs a whole lot of money.

What’s three grand, for such a group that decides that’s how they want to spend their money?

They can stay home, and use FF cameras and lenses.

Alaska is cold and wet and a small professional camera is at a premium.

First we need to accept that any lens or any body is professional capable.

But other question is that how many camera combos you can make that are highly weather sealed?

Now you start to do drop many professional gear as most are not weather sealed up to task of outdoors use in harsh conditions, that anyways very few are ready to face. Not a normal light rain but a pouring water for weeks, where you have everything, every crack in your body wet. And your challenge is to keep front element dry... Nothing else.

The problem with that is that there is very little good data on what is well weather sealed and what isn't. Also, about what kind of weather it's sealed against.

all my cameras work brilliantly in at least 1 kind of weather, therefore they are weather sealed

The ones you want are the ones that are vindaloo-and-eight-pints-of-Carling sealed.

-- hide signature --

263, look deader.

Wu Jiaqiu
Wu Jiaqiu Forum Pro • Posts: 24,560
Re: MFT is the lightest and smallest professional system

bobn2 wrote:

Wu Jiaqiu wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

Tommi K1 wrote:

Humansvillian wrote:

  • Tommi K1 wrote:

Colin Smith1 wrote:

I have just returned from a photo trip to Nome, Alaska. Everyone on the trip, including the guide, was using Olympus EM-1X and one Panasonic MFT. There was only one guy on the trip still using a huge Nikon body and 600MM lens.

That is difficult to believe, unless it was a m4/3 club own trip.

What’s surprising is the one guy with the large gear.

Camera bodies are lens holders.

The smallest professional cameras take MFT lenses.

The smallest pro lenses are MFT. A 300mm MFT lens replaces a 600mm FF.

Flying thousands of miles to Alaska and hiring a boat and guide to take photographs costs a whole lot of money.

What’s three grand, for such a group that decides that’s how they want to spend their money?

They can stay home, and use FF cameras and lenses.

Alaska is cold and wet and a small professional camera is at a premium.

First we need to accept that any lens or any body is professional capable.

But other question is that how many camera combos you can make that are highly weather sealed?

Now you start to do drop many professional gear as most are not weather sealed up to task of outdoors use in harsh conditions, that anyways very few are ready to face. Not a normal light rain but a pouring water for weeks, where you have everything, every crack in your body wet. And your challenge is to keep front element dry... Nothing else.

The problem with that is that there is very little good data on what is well weather sealed and what isn't. Also, about what kind of weather it's sealed against.

all my cameras work brilliantly in at least 1 kind of weather, therefore they are weather sealed

The ones you want are the ones that are vindaloo-and-eight-pints-of-Carling sealed.

there's a storm coming?

 Wu Jiaqiu's gear list:Wu Jiaqiu's gear list
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G Dickson Contributing Member • Posts: 585
Re: Tom... this seems like a very extraordinary circumstance

Marty4650 wrote:

Whenever 50% of the cameras used are $3,000 M4/3 cameras, then you know this isn't an ordinary vacation or cruise. I think the key words here are "Nome" and "Alaska."

Whenever people get a once in a lifetime chance to shoot in an extremely harsh environment, then they are likely to spend the money to get the best weather sealing they can find. And the E-M1X is a very good choice for that.

If the event was a rock concert, then 98% of the cameras used would have been smartphones. If the event was a senior citizen cruise, then 75% would probably be DSLRs. And entry level ones at that.

In that context I think 50% of the cameras used for a trip to Nome Alaska makes sense. The other 50% were probably high end (and very well sealed) DSLRs.

Over the years I have dealt with a number (actually loads) of senior citizen groups on African safaris.  The one common thing (apart from someone always being called Bob in almost every group) is that they are more addicted to their smartphones than most teenagers I see through our doors...

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mikero Contributing Member • Posts: 972
Re: Everyone Using MFT
1
  • James Stirling wrote:

Model Mike wrote:

Photo Pete wrote:

The only problem with this story is that proper use of a tripod will achieve better sharpness than not using one, no matter what system you shoot.

Not sure that applies so much these days, given the excellent stabilisation available on modern cameras. Use of the tripod is more about maintaining and optimising composition, and for multiple-frame images e.g. HDR and sensor shift.

Mike, though the stabilisation systems are great I still think that if you want the absolute best quality tripods are the way to go. Though many here claim to take "sharp" multi-second hand-held shots I have never seen one posted that I would call critically sharp, certainly it is miraculous to get anything at those crazy speeds but not really sharp . Stick your camera on a decent tripod, set delay , IBIS off etc , set your lens to its optimum aperture and then compare to a hand-held shot using multiple stops of IBIS , even I get hand-held shots sharp at 1/16000th

Yeah. But...

Ofttimes shooting wildlife you need to be quick. By the time you've the tripod sorted, it's gone. And for me (at least) hand-holding a 600mm FF prime is a non-starter. A MFT setup just makes it easier to capture action, unless you're into birds on sticks.

Mike

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FrankS009
FrankS009 Veteran Member • Posts: 6,236
Re: Everyone Using MFT
3

What we mostly learn from such posts as this is people's prejudices.

F.

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"We shoot the things that move us in ways that will move others." David duChemin
"What's the use of having a great depth of field if there is not an adequate depth of feeling?" - W. Eugene Smith

Humansvillian
Humansvillian Senior Member • Posts: 1,957
Re: What MFT lenses did the guide use?
1

Colin Smith1 wrote:

Humansvillian wrote:

An enterprising Alaskan hired out himself and his boat to five pilgrims, from afar.

The guide has a reason to own the latest and best smallest professional camera in the world today.

He’s the professional.

But what lenses, did the guide use?

Same as I had. Olympus 300 F4 and teleconverter and 12-100 and 7-14 Olympus.

A great kit. Not one extra lens.

The 300 costs $2,400, the 12-100 is $1,000, the 7-14 is $850, and the tele cost $300.

And my $400 refurb OMD M 5 II would’ve worked fine to hold those lenses, but for three grand you get the best and latest MFT lens holder.

The M1X is going to sell a ton of lenses, is my prediction.

But Oly needs badly a PL-SX1

$299 with kit lens, $399 with zoom, PL1 box.

The PL1 is what started all this.

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Humansville is a town in the Missouri Ozarks

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Laybourne
Laybourne Forum Member • Posts: 57
Re: Everyone Using MFT
3

One has to admire an 84 y/o hauling around a 600mm lens.

offtheback
offtheback Senior Member • Posts: 1,012
Re: Everyone Using MFT
1

Model Mike wrote:

Photo Pete wrote:

The only problem with this story is that proper use of a tripod will achieve better sharpness than not using one, no matter what system you shoot.

Not sure that applies so much these days, given the excellent stabilisation available on modern cameras. Use of the tripod is more about maintaining and optimising composition, and for multiple-frame images e.g. HDR and sensor shift.

Agreed.At proper shutter speeds nearly impossible to tell the difference without pixel peeping.

New Day Rising
New Day Rising Senior Member • Posts: 2,684
Re: What MFT lenses did the guide use?
1

Humansvillian wrote:

Colin Smith1 wrote:

Humansvillian wrote:

An enterprising Alaskan hired out himself and his boat to five pilgrims, from afar.

The guide has a reason to own the latest and best smallest professional camera in the world today.

He’s the professional.

But what lenses, did the guide use?

Same as I had. Olympus 300 F4 and teleconverter and 12-100 and 7-14 Olympus.

A great kit. Not one extra lens.

The 300 costs $2,400, the 12-100 is $1,000, the 7-14 is $850, and the tele cost $300.

And my $400 refurb OMD M 5 II would’ve worked fine to hold those lenses, but for three grand you get the best and latest MFT lens holder.

Only $7,500! Truly a kit for the masses

The M1X is going to sell a ton of lenses, is my prediction.

But Oly needs badly a PL-SX1

$299 with kit lens, $399 with zoom, PL1 box.

The PL1 is what started all this.

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Humansville is a town in the Missouri Ozarks

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TN Args
TN Args Veteran Member • Posts: 8,357
Re: Everyone Using MFT

Felice62 wrote:

Reluctance to change is quite normal at the age of 84.

I don't blame him..

At least he went digital

He did?

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Messier Object
Messier Object Veteran Member • Posts: 8,393
Re: Everyone Using MFT
9

Laybourne wrote:

One has to admire an 84 y/o hauling around a 600mm lens.

maybe it’s the carrying of weight while walking around (musculoskeletal load bearing) that’s kept him fit and strong into his 80s.

Peter

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