To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

Started 5 months ago | Discussions
Chris Noble
Chris Noble Veteran Member • Posts: 3,180
One ETTR "model"

bobn2 wrote:

Model 1 posits that the purpose of exposure management is to control the output lightness of the final image.

Shooting JPEG. Any post-processing of that file is like taking a photo of a photo.

Model 2 posits that the purpose of exposure management is to ensure the maximum possible information about the scene in the raw file...

Shooting Raw.

ETTR provides a method (though not a great one) for using the tools and vocabulary of Model 1 to achieve at least some of the results of model 2. That, however leads to it being fundamentally inconsistent and contradictory.

No, there is no connection between the two models. Trying to squash them together is what is inconsistent and contradictory.

ETTR is "to the right" of the Raw histogram. Nothing more, nothing less. The "tools" to get there (such as UniWB) are different than the "tools" you use to shoot JPEG.

 Chris Noble's gear list:Chris Noble's gear list
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bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 62,183
Re: One ETTR "model"
1

Chris Noble wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

Model 1 posits that the purpose of exposure management is to control the output lightness of the final image.

Shooting JPEG. Any post-processing of that file is like taking a photo of a photo.

Model 2 posits that the purpose of exposure management is to ensure the maximum possible information about the scene in the raw file...

Shooting Raw.

ETTR provides a method (though not a great one) for using the tools and vocabulary of Model 1 to achieve at least some of the results of model 2. That, however leads to it being fundamentally inconsistent and contradictory.

No, there is no connection between the two models. Trying to squash them together is what is inconsistent and contradictory.

Aren't you agreeing with what I said?

ETTR is "to the right" of the Raw histogram. Nothing more, nothing less. The "tools" to get there (such as UniWB) are different than the "tools" you use to shoot JPEG.

That's according to you. Other proponents of ETTR wouldn't agree that definition. Further, a raw histogram is rarely available when shooting, and it's not always advisable to push up against it, if you have other constraints.

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Chris Noble
Chris Noble Veteran Member • Posts: 3,180
Re: One ETTR "model"

bobn2 wrote:

Chris Noble wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

Model 1 posits that the purpose of exposure management is to control the output lightness of the final image.

Shooting JPEG. Any post-processing of that file is like taking a photo of a photo.

Model 2 posits that the purpose of exposure management is to ensure the maximum possible information about the scene in the raw file...

Shooting Raw.

ETTR provides a method (though not a great one) for using the tools and vocabulary of Model 1 to achieve at least some of the results of model 2. That, however leads to it being fundamentally inconsistent and contradictory.

No, there is no connection between the two models. Trying to squash them together is what is inconsistent and contradictory.

Aren't you agreeing with what I said?

It's not clear to me what you said. My point is that the tools, vocabulary and optimal exposure are different if you are shooting JPEG vs. Raw. I think we agree on the tools and vocabulary, not sure on the optimal exposure difference.

ETTR is "to the right" of the Raw histogram. Nothing more, nothing less. The "tools" to get there (such as UniWB) are different than the "tools" you use to shoot JPEG.

That's according to you. Other proponents of ETTR wouldn't agree that definition.

I'm not defining how to apply ETTR, just what the term actually means. There's a lot of confusion about that in this thread.

Further, a raw histogram is rarely available when shooting,

It's never available when shooting. That's what makes the technique somewhat complex, and frustrating for beginners. But UniWB and other camera settings help you get close.

and it's not always advisable to push up against it, if you have other constraints.

The correct ETTR exposure is sometimes slightly away from it, sometimes slightly past it. That's because the constraints and the presence of specular highlights affect the choice of settings. I think we agree on that.

 Chris Noble's gear list:Chris Noble's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F4 ASPH Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH Panasonic Leica Summilux DG 25mm F1.4 +3 more
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