To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
big aperture Regular Member • Posts: 463
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

I  do ETTR most of the time... with my camera shooting RAW even at some extreme exposure compensation values i can avoid blowing hightlights....

IIRC ETTR is only meant to be used at base ISO for maximum efficiency/results

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TomFid Veteran Member • Posts: 3,146
Re: Yo PanOly - make this easy!

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that. I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

FingerPainter Veteran Member • Posts: 7,903
Re: Yo PanOly - make this easy!
1

TomFid wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that.

Do you let the camera handle framing the shot too?

I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

Cameras are not designed to do that.

FingerPainter Veteran Member • Posts: 7,903
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?
1

big aperture wrote:

IIRC ETTR is only meant to be used at base ISO for maximum efficiency/results

Well, if you could expose more rather than raise the ISO, yes. But when you have reached there slowest shutter and widest aperture that are acceptable, you can "amplify to the right" on many cameras.

tt321
tt321 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,637
Re: Definition of ETTR

Adielle wrote:

Tom Axford wrote:

There seems to be some uncertainty/disagreement on the meaning of ETTR.

I find this article to be useful.

The relevant quote from that article is:

... ETTR sets exposure so that the brightest significant values just reach to the right-hand edge of the histogram (sensor saturation), and this frequently results in an image that initially appears too bright or too dark – it being assumed that the desired image brightness will be obtained later on either through processing the raw file in a raw converter or post-processing the JPEG in an image editor....

I have emphasised the word "significant" because it is important. ETTR doesn't necessarily mean than nothing in the image is clipped. What it does mean is that, in the photographer's judgement, anything that has been clipped (i.e. blown out or overexposed) is not important to the image and can be sacrificed to obtain a better quality image of the things that matter.

It is indeed the most important word, and what you wrote is accurate. "ETTR" is just a bias towards maximizing highlight and high mid-tone content, and more willingness to sacrifice details in the high frequency spectrum rather than the low frequency spectrum.

High frequency = blue, low frequency = red. How does ETTR favour warm colours at a cost cooler ones?

TomFid Veteran Member • Posts: 3,146
Re: Yo PanOly - make this easy!

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that.

Do you let the camera handle framing the shot too?

Do you let predictive typing write your posts?

I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

Cameras are not designed to do that.

The point is, they should be. Any process that's not essential to the qualitative expression of the image is a good candidate for automation. Figuring out how much exposure can be given without clipping, subject to some constraints like how much shutter speed is needed, is something the camera can do more quickly than you or I can read a histogram and react.

FingerPainter Veteran Member • Posts: 7,903
Re: Yo PanOly - make this easy!

TomFid wrote:

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that.

Do you let the camera handle framing the shot too?

Do you let predictive typing write your posts?

No, I don't All my frequent typos are my own doing.

I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

Cameras are not designed to do that.

The point is, they should be. Any process that's not essential to the qualitative expression of the image is a good candidate for automation. Figuring out how much exposure can be given without clipping, subject to some constraints like how much shutter speed is needed, is something the camera can do more quickly than you or I can read a histogram and react.

It would be nice if they would be designed that way. A problem is how to teach the camera which hightlight details I care about and which ones are inconsequential. Can a camera recognize a specular higlight? Maybe there would be  some way to let the camera  query you about which highlights you want to preserve.

OP Jeepit Regular Member • Posts: 168
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

big aperture wrote:

I do ETTR most of the time... with my camera shooting RAW even at some extreme exposure compensation values i can avoid blowing hightlights....

So does that mean for most of your shots you are pushing the histogram to the right and overexposing... to fix later in PP?

IIRC ETTR is only meant to be used at base ISO for maximum efficiency/results

 Jeepit's gear list:Jeepit's gear list
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TN Args
TN Args Veteran Member • Posts: 8,355
Re: Yo PanOly - make this easy!

TomFid wrote:

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that.

Do you let the camera handle framing the shot too?

Do you let predictive typing write your posts?

I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

Cameras are not designed to do that.

The point is, they should be. Any process that's not essential to the qualitative expression of the image is a good candidate for automation. Figuring out how much exposure can be given without clipping, subject to some constraints like how much shutter speed is needed, is something the camera can do more quickly than you or I can read a histogram and react.

Ah, but you have to change the metering setting to choose that metering mode!

 TN Args's gear list:TN Args's gear list
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knickerhawk Veteran Member • Posts: 6,355
Re: ETTR rules
2

Jeepit wrote:

knickerhawk wrote:

Adielle wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Adielle wrote:

XRF wrote:

Adielle wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Adielle wrote:

Clipping / squeezing highlights is the worst thing to do in MFT as far as I've seen. True for GX8, E-M1 and G6, so I'd expect it to be similar in other models. Far better to be careful and slightly underexpose than to overexpose.

ETTR is the art of NOT clipping or squeezing desired highlights. Once you understand it, that's obvious.

Level 1 ETTR: JPEG histogram.

Level 2 ETTR: raw histogram. Once you learn to do this, best IQ in terms of noise and colour is attained.

Cheers

When people say "expose to the right" I understand it as having a bias towards possibility of overexposing than towards underexposing, and I believe that's what is actually meant. I don't support this bias at all, and I'm saying that it's far better to have a bias towards underexposing, because any obvious loss of quality is much less likely in that situation.

ETTR is maximizing the exposure without clipping any highlights, and setting brightness in post. Technically, reducing exposure to avoid clipping can be considered ETTR if you intend to bring brightness back up in post.

Any mirrorless camera (I don't know about all DSLRs) already aims to do exactly that, by default, when the exposure knob is centered: maximize the exposure without clipping highlights. That's obviously not always the desired setting, because sometimes some highlights lower the average exposure too much, and sometimes you actually want to lower the average exposure and retain highlights better, and sometimes it's actually not enough exposure for whatever reason, so the exposure compensation option is provided (as well as various auto exposure settings). I don't see "ETTR" as having anything to do with "maximizing exposure without clipping" but as having a personal bias towards maximizing the average amount of highlights (getting a histogram with lots of highlight content) in any situation (manually).

You evidently don't understand it. That's why I explained it for you. It has nothing to do with personal bias.

A couple of useful tutorials, 1, 2.

cheers

No, I understand it perfectly, it has everything to do with personal bias. The bias has nothing to do with objective decisions. From that tutorial, "opportunity of biasing the exposure toward the brighter tones" - like I said, this is all about attempting to get as far as possible with biasing exposure "to the right". Obviously, people usually want to do that without clipping things too much, and it's always a matter of trying to get a good balance, but when people say that rather than trying to get a good balance in general, they're "exposing to the right" it means to me that they're obsessed with trying to maximize the exposure and they risk clipping or degrading the quality of highlights more than someone who simply practices sensible exposure based on the conditions and requirements of the shot.

When ETTR'ing you are "biasing" toward improving image SNR (and hence reducing noise and improving tonal detail) at the potential expense of pushing desirable highlight detail to the point of non-recovery in raw conversion and postprocessing. When using conventional metering you are "biasing" toward minimizing the need to adjust image midtones in conversion and postprocessing at the potential expense of reducing image SNR (and hence introducing more image noise and lowered tonal detail). Both strategies are forms of "bias" so trying to frame the issue as only one approach is biased (in a pejorative sense) is misleading.

If the scene presents lower DR than what your camera is capable of capturing

Thank you for your response. How do you now when the DR is low

Well, experience tells you when you're dealing with obviously high DR and low DR scenes, but your histogram can also be informative here (even though it's JPEG-based and rather misleadingly overstates close to clipping the raw highlights are). In short, if you're seeing "unused" room on the right side of the histogram when you're using conventional metering, you're well within the range of a low DR scene that could potentially benefit from an ETTR strategy. This is a very simplified explanation of what to look for and consider and doesn't factor in things like how neutral your camera is set, the specific colors in the scene, the effect of specular highlights, etc.

and secondly how do I know what my EM 1 mark II is capable of in regard to DR?

Here's a link to one measurement of the EM1ii's DR. Note that Bill Claff method of measuring and displaying DR is somewhat different from what you will see at other sites like DXO, but for general discussion purposes, this should do fine.

and you are not otherwise constrained by shutter/aperture limits and you are willing to shoot raw and make appropriate adjustments in conversion/post-processing, there is no reason NOT to ETTR, especially with many mFT cameras that are already generally among the most "biased" toward protecting highlights

please explain your last sentence, thanks

Check the table listing cameras on this page. Sort the table by the "Stops" column and you will see that the EM1ii is second only to the medium format PhaseOne IQ180 in how much highlight headroom (from conventionally metered middle gray at the camera's base ISO) is programmed into the camera. You will notice that quite a few other mFT cameras (mostly Oly's) are also toward the top of the list as well.

. (Indeed, the Oly EM1ii is the most conservatively tuned camera that Bill Claff has measured to date.) If, however, the scene presents higher or potentially higher DR than what your camera is capable of capturing, then determination of whether to ETTR or not is a more complicated one that, in addition to any potential shutter/aperture constraints, depends on the relative importance to the photographer of protecting some or all of the highlights vs. enhancing the shadows and midtones. Any categorical pronouncement about what's right or optimal in such a use case - one way or the other - exposes a lack of sophistication and experience with how to properly mitigate the risks of optimized raw exposure or a more basic misunderstanding of the issue and the very real, very visible impact on improving one's photography possible with optimized raw exposure done right, especially with respect to many if not most current mFT cameras.

By the way, obviously, in many situations, if you're totally obsessed with "exposing to the right", you're never gonna get the shot, because the shutter speed required for it is way too low. The writer of that tutorial (#1) seems completely oblivious to the fact that even in rather bright surroundings, in many cases "ETTR" would mean unacceptably low shutter speed. It's all a matter of balance and it is in fact all about personal biases. An auto "ETTR bias mode" may be a nice thing to add to cameras, but it's absolutely not a proper replacement for the normal auto exposure modes.

knickerhawk Veteran Member • Posts: 6,355
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?
2

Jeepit wrote:

big aperture wrote:

I do ETTR most of the time... with my camera shooting RAW even at some extreme exposure compensation values i can avoid blowing hightlights....

So does that mean for most of your shots you are pushing the histogram to the right and overexposing... to fix later in PP?

You need to ask yourself, "What is overexposing?" If you are shooting raw and exposing in such a way as to avoid clipped highlights that can't be recovered during raw conversion but, consequently, with less noise and more shadow detail than what you would have obtained by exposing per conventional metering, aren't you actually exposing properly? And isn't the conventional metering strategy in that situation actually underexposing?

IIRC ETTR is only meant to be used at base ISO for maximum efficiency/results

TN Args
TN Args Veteran Member • Posts: 8,355
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

Jeepit wrote:

big aperture wrote:

I do ETTR most of the time... with my camera shooting RAW even at some extreme exposure compensation values i can avoid blowing hightlights....

So does that mean for most of your shots you are pushing the histogram to the right and overexposing... to fix later in PP?

Hang on a minute: there is nothing about ETTR that means you will necessarily be "pushing the histogram to the right", or "overexposing".

The term ETTR simply means that you are paying attention to the right hand edge of the histogram (Level 1: JPEG, Level 2: raw histogram) in setting exposure.

In fact, "overexposing" is an oxymoron, surely? If ETTR is done intentionally, you have achieved the exposure you set out to achieve, by definition. Perhaps you meant "over brightening"? To which, my answer above still applies. Some images will come out of the camera brighter than your desired final product, but not all.

What I can say is that, using ETTR, the mid-tone brightness of your photos will come out of the camera in an uncontrolled way. You will need to do more brightness adjusting in post than most other methods. (BTW the metering method that offers most control over tones is Spot, but you need to use it skilfully.)

cheers

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Chris Noble
Chris Noble Veteran Member • Posts: 3,169
ETTR is an esthetic decision

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that.

Do you let the camera handle framing the shot too?

Do you let predictive typing write your posts?

No, I don't All my frequent typos are my own doing.

I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

Cameras are not designed to do that.

The point is, they should be. Any process that's not essential to the qualitative expression of the image is a good candidate for automation. Figuring out how much exposure can be given without clipping, subject to some constraints like how much shutter speed is needed, is something the camera can do more quickly than you or I can read a histogram and react.

It would be nice if they would be designed that way. A problem is how to teach the camera which hightlight details I care about and which ones are inconsequential. Can a camera recognize a specular higlight? Maybe there would be some way to let the camera query you about which highlights you want to preserve.

Photographers who don't "get" ETTR assume that it's a mechanistic process. But once you actually start doing it yourself, you realize that it is an esthetic trade-off, like focus and framing. There is no one "right" ETTR for the shot. Sorry to all you left-brains. You may feel that's a disadvantage, but others like me find that makes it more enjoyable.

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OP Jeepit Regular Member • Posts: 168
Re: ETTR is an esthetic decision

Chris Noble wrote:

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

FingerPainter wrote:

TomFid wrote:

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

TomFid wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

Never had to do this back in the film days; so how important is it now? Do you or don't you ETTR (expose to the right)?

Thanks...

Rick

It seems bizarre to me that we have AI that can recognize airplanes and our kids' faces, so many stops of stabilization that the earth's rotation matters, and metering has hardly advanced at all. We're still guessing at ETTR manually from a jpeg histogram and blinkies - which really means that we're often too busy to manage this, and wind up with gray snow.

What I'd like to have is the ability to set a desired clipping threshold (which might normally be 0, but sometimes .01% or something if there are specular highlights), and let the camera do the rest

My sentiments as well... I want the best pic possible but I don’t want to keep changing the settings and lose the shot!

IMO it is in the nature of photography that you have to keep changing the settings!

It's certainly part of the fun, but so is focusing, and I often let the camera handle that.

Do you let the camera handle framing the shot too?

Do you let predictive typing write your posts?

No, I don't All my frequent typos are my own doing.

I'd like to think about only the bits that are relevant to the image: SS for blur, aperture for DOF, and let the camera worry about how to maximize signal/noise without clipping.

Cameras are not designed to do that.

The point is, they should be. Any process that's not essential to the qualitative expression of the image is a good candidate for automation. Figuring out how much exposure can be given without clipping, subject to some constraints like how much shutter speed is needed, is something the camera can do more quickly than you or I can read a histogram and react.

It would be nice if they would be designed that way. A problem is how to teach the camera which hightlight details I care about and which ones are inconsequential. Can a camera recognize a specular higlight? Maybe there would be some way to let the camera query you about which highlights you want to preserve.

Photographers who don't "get" ETTR assume that it's a mechanistic process. But once you actually start doing it yourself, you realize that it is an esthetic trade-off,

Isn't everything in photography a trade off?

like focus and framing. There is no one "right" ETTR for the shot.

So I hear you saying, 'Not every shot is an ETTR shot.' Use your personal photographer's experience whether you need to ETTR or not.

N disrespect intended...but I'm still a bit befuddled on how, when ( I understand thew 'why') to implement ETTR.

Sorry to all you left-brains. You may feel that's a disadvantage, but others like me find that makes it more enjoyable.

 Jeepit's gear list:Jeepit's gear list
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OP Jeepit Regular Member • Posts: 168
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

knickerhawk wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

big aperture wrote:

I do ETTR most of the time... with my camera shooting RAW even at some extreme exposure compensation values i can avoid blowing hightlights....

So does that mean for most of your shots you are pushing the histogram to the right and overexposing... to fix later in PP?

You need to ask yourself, "What is overexposing?"

Overexposing as in...pushing the histo to the right by using the EC and adding more light to the shot.  (a big if, if I'm explaining this correctly)

-still trying to figure out ETTR-

If you are shooting raw and exposing in such a way as to avoid clipped highlights that can't be recovered during raw conversion but, consequently, with less noise and more shadow detail than what you would have obtained by exposing per conventional metering, aren't you actually exposing properly? And isn't the conventional metering strategy in that situation actually underexposing?

IIRC ETTR is only meant to be used at base ISO for maximum efficiency/results

 Jeepit's gear list:Jeepit's gear list
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FingerPainter Veteran Member • Posts: 7,903
Re: ETTR is an esthetic decision

Jeepit wrote:

So I hear you saying, 'Not every shot is an ETTR shot.' Use your personal photographer's experience whether you need to ETTR or not.

N disrespect intended...but I'm still a bit befuddled on how, when ( I understand thew 'why') to implement ETTR.

When doing so will reduce noisiness without causing other unwanted effects

FingerPainter Veteran Member • Posts: 7,903
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

Jeepit wrote:

knickerhawk wrote:

You need to ask yourself, "What is overexposing?"

Overexposing as in...pushing the histo to the right by using the EC and adding more light to the shot.

That's exposing more,

"Overexposing" implies exposing not just more, but too much.

If you don't blow any highlights that you need to keep, why would exposing more be exposing too much.

OP Jeepit Regular Member • Posts: 168
Re: To ETTR or not to ETTR...?

TN Args wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

big aperture wrote:

I do ETTR most of the time... with my camera shooting RAW even at some extreme exposure compensation values i can avoid blowing hightlights....

So does that mean for most of your shots you are pushing the histogram to the right and overexposing... to fix later in PP?

Hang on a minute: there is nothing about ETTR that means you will necessarily be "pushing the histogram to the right", or "overexposing".

The term ETTR simply means that you are paying attention to the right hand edge of the histogram (Level 1: JPEG, Level 2: raw histogram) in setting exposure.

In fact, "overexposing" is an oxymoron, surely? If ETTR is done intentionally, you have achieved the exposure you set out to achieve,

But how is that the 'exposure you set out to achieve' if your over brightening the already bright (hot) areas?

by definition. Perhaps you meant "over brightening"?

ok, 'over-brightening' will work, please correct me if I'm wrong, but when I '+' the EC from 1-3 the entire image is brightened not just the shadows...which then I can go back in PP and adjust the entire image.  To my understanding you use the ETTR process in order to be able to bring up (lighten up) the shadows with out the noise.

To which, my answer above still applies. Some images will come out of the camera brighter than your desired final product, but not all.

What I can say is that, using ETTR, the mid-tone brightness of your photos will come out of the camera in an uncontrolled way. You will need to do more brightness adjusting in post than most other methods. (BTW the metering method that offers most control over tones is Spot, but you need to use it skilfully.)

cheers

 Jeepit's gear list:Jeepit's gear list
Olympus E-M1 II Olympus E-330 Olympus E-M1 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 12-60mm 1:2.8-4.0 SWD Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 18-180mm 1:3.5-6.3 +16 more
OP Jeepit Regular Member • Posts: 168
Re: ETTR is an esthetic decision

FingerPainter wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

So I hear you saying, 'Not every shot is an ETTR shot.' Use your personal photographer's experience whether you need to ETTR or not.

N disrespect intended...but I'm still a bit befuddled on how, when ( I understand thew 'why') to implement ETTR.

When doing so will reduce noisiness without causing other unwanted effects

makes sense thank you...'causing unwanted effects?'

 Jeepit's gear list:Jeepit's gear list
Olympus E-M1 II Olympus E-330 Olympus E-M1 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 12-60mm 1:2.8-4.0 SWD Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 18-180mm 1:3.5-6.3 +16 more
FingerPainter Veteran Member • Posts: 7,903
Re: ETTR is an esthetic decision
1

Jeepit wrote:

FingerPainter wrote:

Jeepit wrote:

So I hear you saying, 'Not every shot is an ETTR shot.' Use your personal photographer's experience whether you need to ETTR or not.

N disrespect intended...but I'm still a bit befuddled on how, when ( I understand thew 'why') to implement ETTR.

When doing so will reduce noisiness without causing other unwanted effects

makes sense thank you...'causing unwanted effects?'

Slowing the shutter so much you get motion blur.

Widening the aperture so much you get too shallow a DoF, or too much aberration blur.

Increasing the exposure so much you blow desired highlight detail (though by definition this wouldn't be ETTR, it would be EPTR = exposing past the right).

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